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HISTORY 



of the Town of 



WALDOBORO, 

Maine, 



By 



SAMUEL L. MILLER. 



ILLUSTRATED. 



f 






\\^' 



EMERSON, PRINTER, 
WISCASSE'I', 

igio. 



/i^/ 



PREFACE. 

In the preparation of the History of Waldo- 
boro we have responded to the request of many 
residents and former residents of the town. Near- 
ly forty years ago we began to collect information 
for this work, and many who freely gave this in- 
formation have passed to the life beyond. In no 
sense have we attempted to make this a genealogy. 

In the prosecution of the work we have avail- 
ed ourselves of the records of the town, county, 
State and United States. We have consulted 
books, pamphlets and traditionary information. 
From the Massachusetts archives at the State 
House, Boston, the Boston Public Library, the 
Maine Historical Society, Eaton's Annals of 
Warren, and Johnston's History of Bristol and Bre- 
men, we secured much valuable information. We 
are under especial obligation to Prof. Henry L. 
Chapman of Bowdoin College, William D. Pat- 
terson, Esq., of Wiscasset, A. R. Reed, Esq., of 
Waldoboro, and others for assistance. 

We hope our critical readers will take into 
consideration the many difficulties involved, re- 
conciling conflicting statements, and verifying tra- 



4 PRE FA CE. 

ditions. especially in the lirst twenty-rive years of 
our history, for which we have no written records. 
The German language, too. has been a source of 
much inconvenience. 

With this brief explanation we submit the 
Histor}- of W'aldoboro. 

Samuel L. Miller. 
Waldoboro, yiiiu /, igio. 



CHAPTER I. 

THE WALDO PATENT. 

A history of the Town of Waldoboro, Maine, 
properly begins with an account of the Muscoxgus, 
or Waldo Patent. In 1606 a grant was made to 
the Plymouth Company of the northern part of 
the territory claimed by the English. During the 
previous year Capt. George Weymouth had been 
dispatched across the Atlantic, and on the 1 7th of 
May had anchored at Monhegan.' In 1607 the 
Plymouth Company established what is known as 
the Popham colony, at the mouth of the Kennebec 
river, which, however, only remained one year. 
In 16 14 the Plymouth Company sent out from 
London Capt. John Smith, who, ranged the coast 
from Penobscot to Cape Cod. On his return, 
prince Charles, afterwards, king Charles I, being 
presented a map of the territory, gave it the name 
of New England. This name was ofificially recog- 
nized in the charter by which that monarch 
granted the territory between 40° and 48° N. lat- 
itude, to "The Council of Plymouth," which, in 
1620 took the place of the "Plymouth Company." 
Monhegan was at this time a general resort 



Indian name for Grand Island. 



6 HISTORY OF IVALDOBORO. 

for European fishermen and traders. Temporary 
settlements were also made on the mainland. 
John Brown was located at New Harbor as early 
as 1 62 1 and in 1625 obtained from the Indian 
Sagamores Samoset and Unongoit, in considera- 
tion of fifty skins, a deed of the land between 
Broad Bay and Damariscotta river, to the extent 
of twenty-five miles into the country. John Brown 
and his descendants remained there till driven 
away by the Indians. They claimed the land un- 
der this deed till the adjustment of 18 12. 

About 1630 serious apprehensions were en- 
tertained that the Council of Plymouth would be 
dissolved. Laboring under this fear the Council 
made various hasty grants, among which was the 
grant, March 23d, 1630, to Beauchamp and Lever- 
€tt, called the"Lincolnshire, or Muscongus Patent," 
or grant. Its extent was from the seaboard be- 
tween the rivers of Penobscot and Muscongus,' to 
an unsurveyed line running east and west and so 
far north as would, without interfering with any 
other patent, embrace a territory equal to thirty 
miles square and included nearly all of the present 
counties of Waldo and Knox, and a portion of 
Lincoln. The grant was made to John Beauchamp 
of London, and Thomas Leverett of Boston, 
Lincoln County, England.^ No price was paid 



1. Called by the Indians Seremobscas. 

2. Eaton's Annals of Warren. 



THE WALDO PATENT. 7 

for this tract ; it was thought that the settlement 
of the section would enhance the value of others. 
The same year a trading station was established 
on the Georges river, in what is now Thomaston. 
This settlement was broken up by King Phillip's 
war, which terminated in 1678. After this, with 
the exception of a few weak settlements, the whole 
territory lay desolate for nearly forty years. 

After the death of Beauchamp, Leverett, by 
right of survivorship, succeeded to the whole 
patent. On the death of Leverett in Boston, 1650, 
and of his wife, 1656, the patent passed into the 
hands of their son, Capt. John Leverett, after- 
wards governor of Massachusetts colony. 

In 1720 John Leverett, President of Harvard 
College, a grandson of Governor Leverett, had 
become proprietor of the Muscongus Patent. He 
associated with himself others and they were 
known as the "Ten Associates." Subsequently 
twenty more, including Jonathan and Cornelius 
Waldo, were admitted into the company, under 
mutual obligations for procuring settlers. 

In 1 73 1, the claims of the Thirty Proprietors 
being disputed, Samuel Waldo, of Boston, who 
had secured by purchase, or inheritance, from his 
father, Jonathan Waldo, a considerable interest in 
the Muscongus Patent, was sent to England to 
effect an adjustment. He succeeded so well that, 
on his return, the Thirty Proprietors joined in sur- 



6 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

for European fishermen and traders. Temporary 
settlements were also made on the mainland. 
John Brown was located at New Harbor as early 
as 1 62 1 and in 1625 obtained from the Indian 
Sagamores Samoset and Unongoit, in considera- 
tion of fifty skins, a deed of the land between 
Broad Bay and Damariscotta river, to the extent 
of twenty-five miles into the country. John Brown 
and his descendants remained there till driven 
away by the Indians. They claimed the land un- 
der this deed till the adjustment of 18 12. 

About 1630 serious apprehensions were en- 
tertained that the Council of Plymouth would be 
dissolved. Laboring under this fear the Council 
made various hasty grants, among which was the 
grant. ]\Iarch 23d, 1630, to Beauchamp and Lever- 
ett, called the"Lincolnshire, or Muscongus Patent," 
or errant. Its extent was from the seaboard be- 
tvveen the rivers of Penobscot and Muscongus.' to 
an unsure-eyed line running east and west and so 
far north as would, without interfering with any 
other patent, embrace a territory equal to thirty 
miles square and included nearly all of the present 
counties of Waldo and Knox, and a portion of 
Lincoln. The grant was made to John Beauchamp 
of London, and Thomas Leverett of Boston, 
Lincoln Count)-, England.'' No price was paid 

1. Called by the Indians Seremobscas. 

2. Eatons Annals of Warren. 



THE WALDO PATENT. 7 

for this tract ; it was thought that the settlement 
of the section would enhance the value of others. 
The same year a trading station was established 
on the Georees river, in what is now Thomaston. 
This settlement was broken up by King Phillip's 
war, which terminated in 1678. After this, with 
the exception of a few weak settlements, the whole 
territory lay desolate for nearly forty years. 

After the death of Beauchamp, Leverett, by 
right of survivorship, succeeded to the whole 
patent. On the death of Leverett in Boston, 1650, 
and of his wife, 1656, the patent passed into the 
hands of their son, Capt. John Leverett, after- 
wards governor of Massachusetts colony. 

In 1720 John Leverett, President of Harvard 
College, a grandson of Governor Leverett, had 
become proprietor of the Muscongus Patent. He 
associated with himself others and they were 
known as the "Ten Associates." Subsequently 
twenty more, including Jonathan and Cornelius 
Waldo, were admitted into the company, under 
mutual obligations for procuring settlers. 

In 1 73 I, the claims of the Thirty Proprietors 
being disputed, Samuel Waldo, of Boston, who 
had secured by purchase, or inheritance, from his 
father, Jonathan Waldo, a considerable interest in 
the Muscongus Patent, was sent to England to 
effect an adjustment. He succeeded so well that, 
on his return, the Thirty Proprietors joined in sur- 



8 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

rendering to him for his services, one half of the 
Patent. Subsequently he acquired title to the 
whole region, which thereafter was known as the 
Waldo Patent. 

On the death of Samuel Waldo in 1759 the 
land descended to his four children, Samuel, 
Francis, Lucy and Hannah. The last named be- 
came the wife of Thomas Flucker, Secretary of 
the Province. Flucker afterwards purchased the 
shares belonging to Samuel. Lucy died without 
children. Flucker and Francis Waldo were Tories 
and their property became forfeited to the State. 
In 1774 Henry Knox, afterward a Revolutionary 
general and the first Secretary of War, married 
Miss Lucy Flucker, daughter of Thomas and 
Hannah (Waldo) Flucker and the grand-daughter 
of General Waldo. After the Revolution General 
Knox purchased four-fifths of the whole Patent; the 
remainder was the property of his wife. Thus in 
his own right and the inheritance by his wife, 
he became sole Proprietor of the Waldo estate.' 

The Waldo family was of German descent. 
Jonathan Waldo resided and traded in Boston. 
He died May 26, 1731. His son Samuel, who 
styled himself "the hereditary lord of Broad Bay," 
was born in England in 1696. He also became a 



I. Many of the farms in this vicinity were originally conveyed by 
deeds direct from General Knox and some of these documents, yellow 
with age, bearing his peculiar signature, are still in existance. 



THE WALDO PATENT. 9 

merchant in Boston, on Kinor now State, street. 

Samuel Waldo's children were Samuel 2d, 
Francis, Ralph, Hannah and Lucy. Samuel 
Waldo, 2d, was a graduate of Harvard College, 
resided in Portland and was Judge of Probate. 
He died April 16, 1770, aged 47 years, leaving a 
widow and several children, the eldest being 
Samuel, 3d. This third Samuel settled in Port- 
land and died Oct. 18, 1798, leaving several 
children, the eldest being Samuel, 4th. The 
widow of Samuel Waldo, 2d, in 1804, married 
Salmon Chase, a Portland lawyer, an uncle of Hon. 
Salmon Portland Chase, Chief Justice of the 
United States. 

Samuel Waldo, Sr., was know as General 
Waldo, a title he earned by his conspicuous ser- 
vices in the capture of Louisburg, where he was 
third in rank. He was a gentleman of great en- 
terprise and worth, possessed of much activity 
and perseverance. According to tradition he 
made no less than fifteen voyages across the At- 
lantic, which was no small undertaking in those 
days. His name is perpetuated in this State by 
two towns, a county and a mountain. He was a 
stout, portly man of dark complexion and com- 
manding appearance. 

General Waldo made occasional visits to this 
section and after his death his son came several 
times to look after the estate, or to sell lands. 



CHAPTER II. 

TOPOGRAPHY. 

The town of Waldoboro is bounded on the 
north by Jefferson, Washington and Union ; on 
the east by Union and Warren ; on the south by 
Friendship, the waters of Muscongus Bay and 
Bremen; on the west by Nobleboro and Jefferson. 
Its north line is three and a half miles across while 
near the centre the town broadens to seven miles 
and from Pemaquid Pond on the west to Havener's 
Pond on the east, it is nine miles. Its length 
north and south, from the Washington line to the 
extreme point of Jones' Neck, is thirteen and a half 
miles. The area of the town is 25.376 acres, 
more or less. The northern half of the tow^n is in 
the shape of a coffin. According to the United 
States Coast Survey, the spire of the Baptist Church 
is situated 44 degrees, 5 minutes, 44 1-2 seconds 
north latitude, and 69 degrees, 22 minutes, 6 1-2 
seconds longitude west from Greenwich. 

The Medomak river rises in the town of 
Liberty,' runs through the western part of Apple- 
ton, forms the division line between Washinorton 
and Union, and enters Waldoboro in the centre 

I. M. F. Hanly, Esq. 



TOPOGRAPHY. 13 

of the north boundry line, a short distance above 
Medomak Pond. Before it reaches Waldoboro, it 
receives two considerable tributaries, one from the 
east, called Pattingall's stream, which rises in the 
eastern part of Appleton, and runs through North 
Union to the Medomak ; the other, which rises in 
Liberty and runs through Washington Pond and 
Washington village to the Medomak. Medomak 
Pond, through which the river flows, receives the 
overflow of Little Medomak Pond, situated a mile 
eastward. At Winslow's Mills a stream enters 
the river from the Kaler Pond situated on the 
Nobleboro line. After receiving several minor 
tributaries the Medomak reaches tide water at the 
village, which is very near the centre of the town, 
draining about sixty-two square miles in its course 
of twenty-one miles. The river from the head of 
tide to Broad Bay, some three miles below, is 
somewhat shallow. The flats on both sides of the 
channel have been gradually filling up, undoubt- 
edly aided by the growth of salt grass. A mile or 
more below the village occurs a shoal in the 
channel, known locally as the "Middle Ground," 
which seriously interferes with navigation. 

Three miles below head of tide the river ex- 
pands into Broad Bay, which is more than a mile 
wide, narrowing again between the lower end of 
Dutch Neck and upper end of Jones' Neck, into a 
passage called the "Narrows," which is also 



14 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

marked by a small rocky island called the "Nar- 
rows' Rock." From this point the river continues 
its course, divided below the narrows into two 
channels by Bremen Long Island and Cow Island, 
and empties into Muscongus Bay eight or ten 
miles from head of tide. The river formerly 
abounded with salmon. Alewives have been 
more or less abundant and smelt have always 
been taken in the spring. In recent years smelt 
fishing through the ice has become a considerable 
industry. 

Besides the ponds already mentioned, Gross 
Pond, in the southwestern part of the town, is 
noted for its steep banks and great depth of water, 
which give it a place among the natural curiosities. 
The western line borders Pemaquid Pond three 
quarters of a mile and extends the entire length 
of Duck Puddle stream and pond, and on the 
eastern line we find Sidensparker's and Havener's 
ponds. 

Dutch Neck, a large peninsula, forming the 
western shore of Broad Bay, was evidently once 
an island. The tide which makes up an inlet from 
Broad Cove at the present time, nearly reaches 
the waters of Medomak river at Meeting House 
Cove. 

The geological features of the town are 
common to those of this part of the country. 
Countless ages ago the earth was vastly hotter 



TOPOGRAPHY. 15 

than it is now. While cooling- it has been con- 
tracting and this contraction going on slowly, 
caused the sedementary, organic and igneous 
rocks, which formed the crust of the earth, to 
yield more to the strain in some places than in 
others. Consequently we find the surface of 
Waldoboro elevated into ridges and depressed 
into valleys. Many of these ridges are of con- 
siderable elevation though none are distinguished 
as mountains. The village is situated between 
two ranges of hills which rise to the height of two 
or three hundred feet, and the highways by which 
it is approached from any direction, except the 
north, pass over high hills, which our forefathers 
made no attempt to avoid. Frock's Ledge, near 
the village is a prominent elevation of rock, and 
in the southwestern part of the town, on the 
Bremen road, the rock rears itself perpendicularly 
many feet above the highway. Rocky precipices 
are found in other parts of the town. 

The igneous rocks, produced from materials 
fused by intense subterranean heat, and forced in- 
to veins of adjacent rocks, while in fluid condition, 
have produced excellent granite. The largest 
quarry of granite in town and the only one ex- 
tensively worked, is that of Booth Brothers & 
Hurricane Island Granite Company, north of the 
village, from which, among other contracts was 
taken the stone for an extension to the State 



16 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

House at Augusta, and for the Naval Academy- 
buildings at Annapolis. The Waldoboro granite 
is fine grained, light colored rock, composed of 
small crystals of feldspar and quartz with only 
specks of black mica/ 

The land was once covered by water. As 
the waters subsided, or the sea bottom was pushed 
up, terraces were formed by the action of the 
waves of the sea. One of these terraces may be 
seen in Levitt Storer's pasture on the east side, 
and similar terraces may be traced on the hillsides 
west of the river. That the land was once sea 
bottom is further proven by the alluvial deposits. 
In making excavations far above present tide 
water, substance is found closely resembling ma- 
rine flats in which sea shells are often embedded. 

The entire territory, at some remote time, 
was covered by ice. Grooves and scratches upon 
ledges and rocks show the action of the glacial 
period, which is also shown in the deposit of 
masses of rocks and bowlders brought down by 
the ice. On the farm of W. J. Ewell, east of 
South Waldoboro road, is an immense mass of 
stone 45 feet long, 32 feet wide, and 91-2 feet 
above ground, weighing more than a thousand 
tons. This stone shows the tremendous force of 

I. C. H. Hitchcock was in error when he reported limestone in Wal- 
doboro. None was ever discovered. Lime was formerly manufactured 
here from stone transported by water from Thomaston. 



TOPOGRAPHY. 17 

the glacial action. Another feature resulting from 
the drift period is the "horseback," or ridge of 
sand and gravel, one of which extends from the 
Union road to the North Waldoboro road south 
of the Benner mill brook. 

The soil of this region is shallow, the under- 
lying rock frequently protuding. The soil is 
generally a sandy loam, while clay abounds in 
many places. Brick has been manufactured here 
for local uses. 

Nearly all the swamps contain peat, locally 
known as muck. In the northwestern corner of 
the town is a large marsh, or bog, which extends 
across the line into Jefferson. 

Where the primitive forest was composed 
mostly of deciduous trees, like the oak, maple and 
beech, upon being cut away, the succeeding 
growth has been found to be made up mostly of 
coniferae, as the spruce, pine and fir. The original 
forest contained many trees of magnificient white 

pine. 

Abundant evidence exists of the work of that 
industrious litde quadruped, the beaver, and many 
of the brooks in town have dams and meadows 
produced by these animals, which disappeared be- 
fore the advance of civilization. 



CHAPTER III. 

EARLY SETTLEMENT. 

No evidence appears that the Indians ever 
had any permanent abode at Broad Bay, as the 
valley of the Medomak was called, but resorted 
here only in roving bands for the purpose of hunt- 
ing or fishing; or, in later years, to dispute pos- 
session with the detested white settler. Little is 
known of the races of aboriginal people that 
roamed through the unbroken forests of this re- 
gion for centuries previous to the coming of the 
white man. Historians mention a bashaba, or 
great ruler, whose authority extended over many 
tribes, and whose sagamores, or sachems, ac- 
knowledged him as their common sovereign. One 
of the great divisions of the aboriginal inhabitants 
of Maine was the Abenaki. They were divided 
into four tribes, one of which, the Wawenocks, oc- 
cupied the territory extending from the Kennebec 
to the Penobscot. The great bashaba is believed 
to have been of this tribe, and whose principal 
residence was probably near Pemaquid. The 
name Wanenock signifies fearing fiothing, very 
brave. They seemed to have been less inclined 
to war than other tribes, and for many years no 



EARL Y SE TTLEMENT. 19 

serious trouble occurred between them and the 
settlers. In the devasting war between the 
western and eastern Indians, about 1615, the 
Wawenocks were greatly reduced and they were 
still more seriously affected by the dreadful epi- 
demic of 16 1 7. When Broad Bay was first settled 
only a few families of this tribe survived and these 
soon afterwards went to Canada and joined the 
St. Francis Indians. The only evidence we have 
of their presence here are the stone axes, chisels, 
spear and arrow heads, or the chips of flint from 
which they were made, frequently found in this 
vicinity. 

Thirty-five years ago, in a series of articles 
published in the Lincoln Coitnty News on the 
early history of Waldoboro, we expressed some 
skepticism in regard to the claim for any settle- 
ment of Europeans at Broad Bay previous to 1748. 
Later inquiry brought to light evidences which 
have lead us to change our first conclusions. 

The first indication was the record at Salem, 
N. C, of people born at Broad Bay, Maine, at an 
earlier date. Secondly, Dr. M. R. Ludwig pub- 
lished in 1866 a memorial of Philip Christopher 
Vogler, who emigranted to America in 1 742 and 
"located near Broad Bay, in New England." The 
third convincing evidence was found in a letter' 
written by Rev. John Wm. Starman in 1848. In 

I. Vol. v. Maine Historical Society's Collections, page 403. 



20 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

this letter Mr. Starman states that "a few German 
emigrants began the original plantation of Waldo- 
boro ; it is supposed they came over in the sum- 
mer, or autumn, of 1 739. It was first the abode of 
only two or three families to which accessions 
were made in 1 740. The Eastern and Canadian 
Indians, in what was called the Spanish war fell 
upon the settlement in May, 1746, reduced their 
habitations to ashes, killed some of the people, 
and carried the residue away captives. The 
settlement lay waste till 1748." 

If we take Williamson s History of Maine, 
SewaW s Ancient Dominions of Maine, or Baton s 
Annals of Wa7'ren, as authority, there was a 
settlement at Waldoboro, then known as Broad 
Bay, as early as 1740. Eaton says: "The same 
year, 1740, forty German families from Brunswick 
and Saxony, tempted by the imposing offers, 
which the indefatigable Waldo, when in Europe, 
had made and caused to be circulated in their 
language, after first landing at Braintree, Mass., 
arrived at Broad Bay, and laid the foundation of 
the present town of Waldoboro. Prior to this 
there was no settlement nearer to St. George 
than Pemaquid and Damariscotta." Among those 
early settlers Eaton mentions one John Ulmer, 
who acted as preacher, and afterwards removed to 
Thomaston (now Rockland) , and from whom de- 
scended the extensive Ulmer family of that vicini- 



EARL V SE TTL EMENT. 21 

ty. According to these authors, this feeble Ger- 
man colony settled on both sides of the bay, or 
river, and, after suffering incredible hardships, 
was entirely destroyed by the Indians as previous- 
ly mentioned. The houses were burned and 
many of the people killed, or carried into captivity. 
Those, who escaped, fled to St. George or Pema- 

quid. 

In 1896, Mr. Edgar O. Achorn, a Boston law- 
yer, a descendant of the Waldoboro "Eichorns,"' 
made exhaustive researches of this subject, the 
results of which were embodied in a paper read 
before the New England and Maine Historical 
Societies. From the documentary evidence Mr. 
Achorn secured, he reached the conclusion that 
the first settlement of Waldoboro was made in 
1742 ; that the transport arrived at Marblehead in 
October of that year ; that the colony consisted of 
about one hundred and forty souls. "All of the 
writers from whom I have quoted seem to have 
been in error in fixing the date of the first expe- 
dition in 1 740. Eaton was in error when he stated 
that they first landed at Braintree ; and Mr. Keller 
was a month behind the calendar when he dated 
his letter the '6th day of the 9th month in the 

I. The original German name meaning fruit of the oak. Mr. Edgar 
O. Achorn says: "Wherever you find the name of 'Achorn,' which is a 
corruption of the German name <Eichorn,' you may know that the person 
burdened with it reverts back to Waldoboro, for nowhere else was such an 
abortion on this name ever perpetrated". 



22 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

year 1742.' What become of this colony in sore 
distress, as it seems to have been in 1743, is 
still to my mind a matter of inquiry and of doubt. 
Their petition for a ship to be sent to their relief 
to bring them from eastern parts so that they 
may be employed in such business as to enable 
them to support themselves, their wives and 
children, was not granted." 

Mr. Achorn continues: "I am not inclined 
wholly to adopt Eaton's views that they lingered 
until the expedition to Louisburg, 1745, then all 
enlisted under Waldo' and removed their families 
to that place. But I think that evidence as exists 
will confirm the conclusion that the large majority 
did so enlist, and that the remnant only fell a prey 
to, or were dispersed by, the Indians in j\Iay of 
the following year, — 1746." 

But while we now admit the evidence that a 
settlement oi Germans v/as located at Broad Bay 
as early as 1742, we are inclined to believe it was 
not the y^ri-^* settlement in this locality. In 1873 
Rufus K. Sewall, of Wiscasset, the well-known 
historian, in a letter to the author, stated: "Wal- 
doboro had its earliest settlement in the expansion 
of the Pemaquid population." With well-record- 



I. In 1744 two regiments were organized, one commanded by Col. 
William Pepperell, of Kittery; the other by Col. Samuel Waldo, of Fal- 
mouth. In the latter regiment 270 men were credited to Georges and 
Broad Bay. 



EARLY SETTLEMENT. 23 

ed settlements in Bristol, Boothbay and New- 
castle and on the George river a century previous 
to 1742, it would be strange if the many attrac- 
tions of this locality had escaped observation. 
John Taylor had an abode on the Damariscotta 
river at Oyster Shell Neck and Sander, or Alex- 
ander, Gould lived as near as Broad Cove. 
William Hilton settled in what is now Bremen in 
1735. Eaton states that on arrival of these (first) 
German settlers "they found, established in their 
neighborhood, near Broad Cove, a Mr. Burns and 
a man by the name of Boice Cooper, both recently 
from Pemaquid." Johnston's History of Bristol 
states that William Burns, being dissatisfied with 
his location, removed to Broad Bay at the invita- 
tion of Waldo but being driven away by the 
Indians, he took his family to Scituate and in 1748 
returned to Pemaquid, In 1742, in anticipation 
of war vvith France, all the forts, or block houses, 
including Broad Bay, received aid. In 1743 the 
legislature appropriated ^1.280 for putting the 
eastern coast in a state of defence. Of this sum 
^75 was apportioned to Broad Bay, but its ex- 
penditure was delayed. All these evidences ap- 
pear to establish the authenticity of this early 
settlement. 



CHAPTER IV. 

PERMANENT SEITLEMENT. 

In Jul}-, 1748, it became known that the con- 
tending powers, England and France, had agreed 
upon the preHminaries of peace, and although the 
definite treaty was not signed, at Aix-la-Chapelle, 
till Oct. 7th, the eastern Indians discontinued their 
ravages and bloodshed. Following this treaty 
Governor Shirley arranged for several Indian chiefs 
to visit Boston where their friendly professions 
were favorably received. Confidence in the 
peaceable disposition of the Indians was so strong 
that the garrisons were reduced and settlers v.-ho 
had sought refuge in the block houses, returned 
to their farms on the Georges river and at other 
points. It is very well established that some of 
those driven away from Broad Bay in 1746, re- 
turned but whether before or after the arrival of 
another colony is uncertain. 

In the meantime the persevering Waldo was 
not idle. Through the efforts of his agents be- 
tween twenty and thirty families were induced to 
leave their native land and seek new homes in the 
wilderness of Maine. This colony, which Judge 
Groton states numbered about fifty people, arrived 



PERMANENT SETTLEMENT. 25 

in the waters of Broad Bay in the autumn of 1748, 
probably in November. 

The place of their landing became known as 
Schenck's Point,' named for one of the settlers 
who afterwards became its owner. It was not 
then the beautiful spot which now attracts the eye. 
Those pioneers gazed out upon that expansion of 
the river, which rightly derived the name of Broad 
Bay, while behind them was the unbroken, path- 
less wilderness, with not an acre cleared nor a 
house standing. 

The vessel in which they came sailed away, 
and they were left to face the stern realities of 
their condition. The severe winter of this climate 
was upon them; they v.-ere without shelter and 
scantily supplied with provisions. Hastily con- 
structed log huts provided the only protection 
from the inclmency of the season. Well preserved 
traditions furnish convincing proof of the terrible 
hardships and sufferings of these first settlers on 
the banks of the Medomak." The only name 
among those who composed this colony, which 



1. This site is now occupied by the summer residence of John J. 
Cooney, Esq., of New York, one of the most attractive spots on the Me- 
domak river. 

2. Medomac — Also written Madaamock, and Madahumic. This 
variation suggests the form Matta-am-ock; Matta meaning not, — nanias, 

Jish, — ock, place; implying the part of the river where the ocean fish are 
not found, as not being able to pass above the tide- water over the falls 
called Chegeeiuunnusstick, just above the village of Waldoboro.'" — U. S. 
Coast Survey Report of 1868. 



26 



HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 



I 
I 

i 



has come down to us with any certaint}', is that of 
Martin Heyer, who died from exposure and hun- 
ger during the winter, a few months before his 
son was born. This birth, which was the first in 

the colony, occurred 
-"' April lo, 1749, and 

the boy was named 
■ , Conrad Heyer. 

With the coming 
of spring they began 
to clear the land for 
cultivation, though 
they possessed little 
knowledge of such 
work and the tools 
and implements 
brought from Ger- 
many were poorly 
adapted to their needs. 

We can scarcely picture in our imagination 
the appearance of the region at this time. The 
beholder viewed from the waters of Broad Bay 
the hills and valleys on both banks covered with 
the unbroken wilderness. The more adventure- 
some settlers soon explored the region and dis- 
covered the lower falls of the river at the head of 
tide where in 1749 Ector and Martin, two men of 
English extraction, arrived and built a saw mill. 
This mill was on the western side of the river, op- 




CONRAD HEYER. 



PERMANENT SETTLEMENT. 27 

posite the mills which were known later as 
Sproul's Mills. 

Eaton states, on the authority of Joseph 
Ludwig, that in 1752 twenty or thirty more Ger- 
man families, who had arrived the previous year 
in Massachusetts, whither they had been invited 
and partially provided for by government, were in- 
duced to remove to Broad Bay and settle with their 
countrymen there, on Dutch Neck and down 
about the narrows. There were some school- 
masters among them but no regular clergyman, 
although religious meetings were kept up on the 
Sabbath without interruption. Probably Mr. Ulmer 
continued to exhort and in some measure act the 
part of clergyman. 

Mr. Starman says that in 1 75 i , between twenty 
and thirty families came over, and their necessities 
were relieved at the public expense as well as by 
private charities. It is difficult to understand 
whether referred to the 1748 or the 1752 colony. 

John Ulmer, who subsequently removed to 
Rockland, possessed a natural fluency of speech 
and no lack of confidence. His religious services 
he occasionally rendered, also, for the edification of 
those who assembled in his humble log cabin in 
the latter place. These clerical functions, how- 
ever, seem not to have wholly withdrawn his mind 
from earthly possessions, nor prevented him from 
the occasional use of profane language; for the 



28 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Story is told that, on one occasion in the midst of 
his rehgious services, perceiving his potato patch 
in danger, he suddenly broke out with: "Donner 
and blitzen! Yacob, Yacob, dare is de tarn hogs in 
the pertaters! tousand teifel! run, run, trive dem 
out and put up de fence." 



CHAPTER V. 

GENERAL WALDO's CIRCULAR. 

In 1753 General Waldo's son, Samuel Waldo^ 
2nd, visited Germany and caused to be published 
the circulars which induced a large part of our an- 
cestors to settle here. A few years ago a copy of 
this circular was found among the private papers 
of the late John W. Shepherd of Belfast, a son of 
one of the early settlers of Waldoboro, and was 
translated by Dr. A. T. Wheelock of the same city. 
It is here published in full as a part of our local 
history. 

[extract from the IMPERIAL POST NEWSPAPER NUM- 
BER FORTY-SEVEN, MARCH 23, 1 753.] 

The Royal British Captain Waldo, hereditary 
lord of Broad Bay, Massachusetts, having arrived 
in Germany from New England, and having taking 
up his abode in the dwelling of Hofrath Luther, 
this is made known to all those who intended ta 
go to New England this spring, and are seeking 
permission from their respective governments, 
and who further are able to pay the passage 
money, to the end that they may apply either to 
himself, or these already made known places of 
address, viz: Luther's type foundry, and the 



30 HISTORY OF IVALDOBORO. 

office of Eichenberg's newspaper in Frankfort, 
Leucht and Allerger's printing office in Augs- 
burg, Mr. John Lewis Martin (merchant) in Hil- 
broun, and Mr. Goethel's printing office in Spires, 
(all of which are hereby made known to be regu- 
larly authorized, where, also, any other informa- 
tion may be obtained), and learn what is abso- 
lutely certain in regard to their journey, and make 
their contracts; while at the same time there is 
not the slightest notice to be taken of those 
people who go about, sending back and forth, and 
undertaking that for which they have no authority ; 
although much may be undertaken in the name of 
New England, and the people stirred up by those 
who have not received the slightest commission 
therefor. Accordingly, all other persons beside 
the above fully empowered houses, even if they 
profess to treat in the name of Samuel Waldo, 
Brigadier General in the royal army of Great 
Britian ; or pretend to do business for the advan- 
tage of his colony, where most of the Germans 
have settled ; and if even American letters have 
already passed through their hands, and they have 
had some useless business transactions with men, 
ships, &c., not in the appointed places; or produce 
other sealed documents, attested of little worth, 
which savor of the old custom; all such persons, in 
so far as they have received no orders from the 
aforesaid houses, will be shut out from all concern 



GENERAL WALDO'S CLRCULAR. 31 

in the matter. But at the same time, by virtue of 
the full power of attorney situated at Frankfort, 
all and everything will be considered as binding, 
which may be done by the highly esteemed son of 
this gentleman, the hereditary Lord of Broad Bay, 
or by the aforesaid fully empowered houses. 

The promised one hundred and twenty acres, 
German measure, will be measured out to each as 
his own property, and that of his heirs in the same 
manner as if Gen. Waldo himself had transacted 
the business, and had been personally present. 
While, then, the people are warned to apply no 
where else then at the aforesaid places, and not to 
undertake the journey at once, without special 
papers of assignment and acceptance, (which every 
man in the neighborhood must obtain and thus 
secure himself) and thus be sure of his free pas- 
sage; because it is intended to take only a suitable 
number of those who can pay their entire passage, 
or at least the half of it (as in the case of some), 
and not all, as affirmed in the excitement got up 
here and there, by certain utterly unauthorized 
persons, in the name of New England, about 
which we hear of the greatest indignation being- 
produced — at the same time it is intended to op- 
pose all fraud, to treat the people justly, and to 
confer a heritage on those who pay the whole 
passage money, on which no unfair demands will 
be made, as has been the evil custom ; but what is 



for their Advanta^t* will be pointt\l out to those 
who are emii^ratini^\ 

The time of o: ' '-^ ^'^ ' the place of 

o^athering. with an\ uuion. will be 

mavie kno\^-n to all 

Vo this it is now added that the passes al- 
" '^ - -vvse in the name of 
- - the Duke of New 
State, roii^ther \vith the need- 
ed .ted with it. also the suitable 
- Cii . - his e:s:cellency. 
V • ^ ■ ^ -"-^' at the honor- 
s': ~~ ^ — .. are already 



.7 



czmam- 



r z extends rses m 
e. - " ■ 

Hnai-^ wesx, .- . ^ re :iie mericSaii of London. 

- roaije irr of grssr disrricis, or vfiriskms, 

vcr..cr. r::^ . . - : irself, or to liie 



GENERAL WALDCfS CIRCULAR. 33 

most prominent settlers, or to gentlemen residing 
in England, to whom it was transferred by the 
crown, as Pennsylvania; therefore the economy or 
form of government rests upon almost the same 
basis as that; except that each of these districts 
can make certain domestic arrangements without 
depending on the General Assembly therefor, 
which otherwise might not be accomplished. 

Boston, the principal city of this Province 
which has been already built more than one hun- 
dred and fift>^ years, and is occupied by a great 
number of English inhabitants, in g-: urn- 

stances, lies about midway between Pr.:.: 
and Halifax in Nova Scotia. It is dista... .. --. 
this last named Province about five hundred 
English miles, and separated from it by a great 
bay called the Bay of Fundy. The climate is ac- 
knowledged to be healthy, and the soil is exceed- 
ingly fruitful, since the wood which grows there is 
mostly oak, beach, ash, maple, and the like, and 
it yields all manner of fruit as in Germany, but 
hemp and flax in greater perfection. Ako, there 
is much game in the woods, and many fish in the 
streams, and every one is permitted to hunt and 

fish. 

The government of Boston, from whence is a 
well built road and regulated mail to go to Penn- 
sylvania, which lies only sixt)--five or seventy Ger- 
man miles from it, has lately, in an assembly held 



32 HISTORY OF IVALDOBORO. 

for their advantage will be pointed out to those 
who are emigrating. 

The time of departure, and the place of 
gathering, with any further information, will be 
made known to all. 

To this it is now added that the passes al- 
ready made out for this purpose in the name of 
His Britannic Majesty, by the Duke of New 
Castle, Secretary of State, together with the need- 
ed documents connected with it, also the suitable 
letters of recommendation to his excellency, 
Onslow Burrish, the Royal Minister at the honor- 
able States Assembly at Ratisbon, are already 
given out. 

Frankfort on the Maine, 
March 23, 1752. 



The substance in brief, of the principal circum- 
stances and conditions respecting the settle- 
rnejit of foreign Protestants in the Proimice 
of Massachusetts Bay in New Efigland, 
especially Broad Bay. 

This province lies, and extends itself in 
breadth along the Atlantic Ocean, in general, 
east- north-east and south-south-west, from forty- 
one degrees to forty-three degrees north, and five 
hours west, according to the meridian of London. 
Its land is made up of great districts, or divisions, 
which belong to the government itself, or to the 



GENERAL WALDO'S CLRCULAR. ;3;i 

most prominent settlers, or to gentlemen residing 
in England, to whom it was transferred by the 
crown, as Pennsylvania ; therefore the economy or 
form of government rests upon almost the same 
basis as that ; except that each of these districts 
can make certain domestic arrangements without 
depending on the General Assembly therefor, 
which otherwise might not be accomplished. 

Boston, the principal city of this Province 
which has been already built more than one hun- 
dred and fifty years, and is occupied by a great 
number of Engrlish inhabitants, in ^ood circum- 
stances, lies about midway between Philadelphia 
and Halifax in Nova Scotia. It is distant from 
this last named Province about five hundred 
English miles, and separated from it by a great 
bay called the Bay of Fundy. The climate is ac- 
knowledged to be healthy, and the soil is exceed- 
ingly fruitful, since the wood which grows there is 
mostly oak, beach, ash, maple, and the like, and 
it yields all manner of fruit as in Germany, but 
hemp and flax in greater perfection. Also, there 
is much game in the woods, and many fish in the 
streams, and every one is permitted to hunt and 
fish. 

The government of Boston, from whence is a 
well built road and regulated mail to go to Penn- 
sylvania, which lies only sixty-five or seventy Ger- 
man miles from it, has lately, in an assembly held 



36 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

to trust to Providence and the good will of Samuel 
Waldo, and go forth immediately, at the beginning, 
with the rest, they shall receive besides their free 
passage a little supply of fifteen pounds sterling, 
for two years, out of the above-named capit^.' 
Also it is hoped that their congregations will also 
do something in addition. Boards for the first 
church which is to be built shall also be given, 
and delivered to them. It is to be furtlier re- 
marked that the first families going thither, al- 
though there should be several hund'red of them, 
can all select their residences either in a seaport 
or on navigable river, where they can cut wood 
into cords for burning, or into timber for building 
material, and convey it to the shore, where it will 
always be taken of them by the ships for ready 
money, and carried to Boston or other cities, and 
from thence whatever they need will be brought 
back in return, at a reasonable rate. By means 
of which the people are not only able at once to sup- 
port themselves until the land is fit for cultivation, 
but also are freed from the trouble and expense 
of making wagons, and traveling by land, to which 
difficulties it is well known Pennsylvania is sub- 
jected. Also, the government aforesaid has heard 
from people themselves, who have already come 
from Pennsylvania itself, the unjust treatment 
(well known to the world without any such an- 
nouncement) which befell them upon the sea, after 



GENERAL WALDO'S CIRCULAR. 37 

they had sailed from Holland, and has already 
made a regulation to prevent the like, for the 
future, in the voyage from Holland to Boston ; ac- 
cording to which, not only the ship captains who 
bring the people over, but those who accompany 
them, must govern their conduct by the prescribed 
regulations, otherwise they will receive punish- 
ment, and be compelled to give the people 
satisfaction ; and also the ship itself will be taken 
care of. Thus are the like mischances in various 
ways prevented, and every one is made secure. 

In order to avoid prolixity, this is suffered to 
suffice. Any one can easily gather out of what 
has been said, that it has not been the intention 
to persuade people to this expedition : and those 
who without this had resolved upon it of their own 
accord, will try their best not to suffer themselves 
to be deceived ; and thus can, unhindered, carry 
out their journey in the name of God, upon the 
next time announced to the public, with govern- 
mental passports. He who in addition to this, 
wishes to inform himself more definitely with re- 
gard to any point, can apply to the houses and 
places of address made known in the Imperial 
Mail newspaper of March 23, 1753, or by prepaid 
letters. 



We, Thomas Holies, Duke of 
Newcastle, Count of Clare, Lord of 



38 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

L 3 Houghton, Baron Pelham of Laugh- 

ton, Knight of the Royal Order of 
the Garter, member of his Majesty's 
Secret Council, and first Secretary of State, &c. 

To all Admirals, Captains, Officers, Gover- 
nors, Mayors. Sheriffs, Justices of the Peace, 
Commanders, Custom House Officers, Overseers, 
Inspectors, and all others whom this pass may 
concern, greeting: This passport, made out in 
the name of the Kino-, aoes forth to desire, and 
demand of you, that you allow and permit the 
bearer of this pass, Gen. Samuel Waldo, one of 
the principal Proprietaries in that part of the 
King's lands w^hich lies on Massachusetts Bay, 
New England, together with his servants, his ef- 
fects, and whatever is needful to him, to travel 
free and unhindered from hence to Harwich, or to 
any other seaport in England, that he may there 
embark and pass over to Holland. Further, also, 
we hereby pray and desire, that all servant, officers, 
and subjects of all Princes and States, who are 
allied with, and friendly to the King, w^ill permit 
the said Gen. Waldo to pursue his journey to 
Frankfort on the Maine, or to any other place in 
Germany or in Switzerland, with the permission 
of the several Princes and States whom this may 
concern, in order to collect the people of the 
Protestant faith, who may wish to settle in the 
aforesaid Province of Massachussetts Bay. And 



GENERAL WALDO'S CLRCULAR. 39 

further, in accordance with this, to permit him the 
aforesaid General Samuel Waldo, and also such 
persons as in the aforesaid manner shall suffer 
themselves to be united with him, to travel, to- 
gether with their guides and all their effects, free 
and unhindered, through Switzerland and the 
various countries of Germany to Holland, in order 
to embark at Amsterdam, or any other seaport of 
this country, to be transported to the aforesaid 
Province of Massachusetts Bay. Finally, all the 
King's servants who may chance to be in any 
territory of the aforesaid Princes and States, are 
hereby besought to support and to protect the 
aforesaid General Samuel Waldo in his purpose, 
so that he may easily carry out his plans aforesaid, 
and put them into effect. 

Given at Whitehall, the second day of March, 
1753, in the twenty-sixth year of the King's reign. 



CHAPTER VI. 

SECOND PERMANENT COLONY. 

The glowing inducements held out by Gen- 
eral Waldo in the announcement published in 
Chapter V, had its effect upon the peasantry of 
Germany, oppressed by wars and taxation. Sixty 
families in different parts of the valley of the 
Rhine immediately made preparations to emigrate. 
Leaving their homes in Kinderroth, Franconia, 
Sv/abia and VVirtemburg, some of them traveled 
more than twenty miles by land to the Rhine 
where they embarked in small boats and descend- 
ed the river to Dusseldorf, in which place they 
w^aited for others to arrive and then proceeded to 
Amsterdam. 

Embarking on board ship they sailed from 
the port of Amsterdam in June, 1753, but touched 
at Cowes, Isle of Wight, where several of their 
number died and were buried on the island. One, 
at least, left the company there and proceeded to 
London where he remained and amassed a fortune 
in the manufacture of paper.' 

1. This was Thomas Muhler, or MuUer, or Miller, whose brother 
Frank reached Broad Bay with the colony and was the ancestor of the 
Waldoboro Millers. His wife Anna, who died Oct. 26, 1820, never 
learned to speak the English language. Thomas died single. 



SECOND PERMANENT COLONY. 41 

From Cowes they sailed for Portsmouth and 
thence to St. George's river. At Pleasant Point 
they were crowded into a sloop as close as they 
could stand, and brought around to Broad Bay, 
where they arrived in September (1753) ^^^' ^^' 
cording to Waldo's circular, should have received 
six months support. Yet they were left wholly 
unprovided for during the winter. A few found 
shelter among their countrymen who came in 
1748 ; others were crowded into a house near the 
present town house; but the greatest number 
were lodged in a shed erected for that purpose. 
This shed was west of the street running from 
Kaler's Corner and across the street from the lo- 
cation of the late canning factory. It was sixty 
feet long, without chimneys, and utterly unfit for 
human habitation. Here these destitute people, 
deserted by their patron, dragged out a winter of 
inconceivable suffering. Seventeen died from 
exposure and starvation, or from diseases induced 
by their privations, and were buried on a knoll m 
the field west of the shed. This spot, which can 
be easily identified, should be enclosed and mark- 
ed with a suitable monument by the descendants 
of the early settlers whose remains rest there. 

The previous settlers were too poorly sup- 
plied themselves to render the new comers much 
assistance. Eaton states they were fain to work 
for a quart of buttermilk a day and considered it 



42 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

quite a boon when they could obtain a quart of 
meal for a day's labor. They sought for employ- 
ment on the Damariscotta and St. George's and 
many of the children were put out to service in 
those settlements. With hunting and fishing 
they were unacquainted and clams appear to have 
been the only article of food they were able to 
obtain themselves. With clams and a little meal 
they made a kind of soup. Some of the settlers 
brought money with them, but even they were un- 
able to procure food, so great was its scarcity. It 
must be remembered that the region was then a 
wilderness with here and there feeble settlements. 
Railroads were unknown and even common wagon 
roads had not been built. 

The next spring Waldo appointed Charles 
Leistner his agent to allot the settlers their prom- 
ised lands and deal out their provisions, which 
probably were transported hither by water as soon 
as the river opened. Leistner' was a man of edu- 
cation and exercised the powers of a magistrate 
during his life, but did not escape the murmurs 
of the settlers, who, in their privations and 
jealouses, accused him, perhaps without reason, 
of selling for his own benefit the provisions which 
had been furnished for them. He also showed 
much injustice in the allotment of their farms. 

I. Leistner, whose signature shows excellent penmanship, spelled his 
name Leissner on a petition to Gov. Shirley in 1756. 



SECOND PERMANENT COLONY. 43 

Instead of one hundred acres on "navigable 
rivers," they were taken back nearly two miles 
westward into the wilderness where they were as- 
signed half an acre each in a compact cluster. 
There they built their huts in the best manner 
they were able. They cleared up their small lots 
and planted them as well as they could, stirring 
up the soil with rude hoes, the only implements 
they had for that purpose. This settlement was 
in what is known as the "Waldoboro Woods," 
back of the Ritz farm. Its remains could be 
traced a few years ago, from which it appears that 
an attempt was made to enclose the settlement 
with a wall. 

This huddling together may have been by 
Leistner's orders, or from fear of Indian hostilities, 
or from both. We have no means of knowing 
how long this arrangement existed, but have 
reasons to suppose that it was of short duration, 
and that these people were soon assigned farms 
of the same proportions as the others, on both 
sides of the Medomak. 

Before the expiration of the year 1753 George 
Werner' (afterwards Varner and now Vannah) 

I. William D. Patterson, of Wiscasset, has a diagram of George 
Werner's land and mill privilege, surveyed by John Martin, July 31, 1766. 
The lot extended from the Medomak river to "House Lot Pond," as 
Kaler's Pond was then called. It shows that the Kinsell mill privilege, so 
called, was on the easterly end of this lot and proves that this was the site 
of Werner's grist mill. 



44 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

built a grist mill, partly on his own and partly on 
Waldo's account. This mill was where the elec- 
tric light plant now stands. George Werner had 
no sons but two daughters who married Kinsell 
and Achorn. 



CHAPTER VII. 

INDIAN WAR. 

This year (1754) the settlers were alloted 
lands. The lines of these farms were orenerally 
run east and west from the river. The occupants 
received no deeds but were granted long leases 
of ninety-nine years on condition of paying a 
nominal rent of a pint of barley or corn, "if called 
for," clearing three acres of land each within two 
years, and building a dwelling at least 16x18 feet. 
The present business part of Waldoboro village 
came into the possession of John Ulmer. The 
first houses, which were only log huts, were lo- 
cated near the banks of the river. As the land 
was cleared and the owners became better able, 
more commodious habitations were erected farther 
from the river, and on many of those old farms 
can be seen two and even three cellars where the 
dwellings of the original owners once stood. The 
only roads were foot paths from house to house. 

The same year General Waldo, for the pro- 
tection of settlers and as a residence for himself 
while at Broad Bay, determined to build stockade, 
or garrison. The spot selected for this stockade was 
where a supply of water was available. This lo- 



46 HISTORY OF U'ALDOBORO. 

cality is now known as Sprout's Spring. This 
was the principle fort at Broad Bay though four 
others were constructed farther down the river, 
one being on the farm of the late Andrew Storer. 
In 1755 the French and Indians began depre- 
dations and in 1756 England formally declared 
war against France. Then to the sufferings of 
the settlers in the wilderness were added the 
horrors of Indian savao^erv. During the next hve 
years the inhabitants of Broad Bay and other 
settlements lived in continual fear. The garrisons 
were occupied as places of refuge, and work upon 
the farms could only be performed under a strong 
guard. All who were able to bear arms were 
organized into companies, receiving for a large 
part of the time, pay and rations which were the 
principal means of support for their families. 
Leistner was Captain of a company of scouts ; 
another company was commanded by one Matthias 
Remilly, who was the first regular commissioned 
militia officer in the place. Farming under such 
circumstances could be carried on only in a limit- 
ed manner, and when the pay and rations of these 
companies failed, great distress ensued. Eaton 
says, "One family at Broad Bay subsisted a whole 
winter on frost fish, with only four quarts of meal. 
Many a German woman was glad to do a hard 
day's work at planting or hoeing, for eight pence, 
or a quart of meal. There were, at this time, but 



INDIAN WAR. 47 

few cattle in that place, and a quart of buttermilk 
would often command a day's work." One man 
went to St. George to buy a cow, and not pos- 
sessing anything else, offered his wife as security 
for the payment of the price of the animal. As 
soon as he could raise the funds he visited the 
former owner of the cow, and redeemed his 
"better half." 

A journal of the operations of one of the 
companies of rangers at Broad Bay was found in 
the Secretary's office at Boston. It was dated 
May 31, 1757, and gives an account of service 
performed for the space of one week. As it is 
somewhat lengthy and not particularly interest- 
ing, we omit it. 

Notwithstanding every precaution Avas taken 
for safety, many were killed during the war and 
others captured by the Indians, who were always 
on the lookout for an opportunity to waylay some 
settler who had ventured away from the garrison. 
The first man killed was one Bouzer, who went in 
search of his cow near the brook at the foot of the 
Thomas hill. The Indians had removed the bell 
from the cow and thus drew him into ambush. 
They also ambushed the house of a Mr. Piper be- 
fore daylight, and shot him dead when he came 
out for wood. His wife having secreted her child 
in the cellar, endeavored to prevent the Indians 
from entering the house; but they shot her 



48 HISTORY OF IVALDOBORO. 

through the door. After their departure the child 
was found safe and uninjured in the cellar. 
Among those captured was a young man by the 
name of Kline, who was carried to Canada. 
When peace was declared his father went thither 
and brought him home. Mr. Lash, who was haul- 
ing wood with a horse and car, was suddenly as- 
sailed by three Indians who attempted to make 
him a prisoner. Lash' being a powerful man, 
seized and held two of them, but the third shot 
him dead. This was Ferdinand Lash's grandfath- 
er, and his house was very near where the resi- 
dence of F. \V. Scott now stands. He was in the 
act of tipping off the load at the door when 
attacked. This affair has sometimes been con- 
founded with the murder of another Lash, at 
a later period. Farther down the river, an as- 
sault was made on Loring Sides, ^ who with his 
little son, was in search of his cattle but a short 
distance from the garrison. Discovering the In- 
dians, the boy ran by direction of his father and 
escaped ; but Sides was killed, scalped and his 
body mutilated. This occurred on that part of the 
old Sides place now owned by Capt. Albion Stahl. 
A tomahawk was found in the head of the 
murdered man, and is now in the possession of 
A. R. Reed of this place. The Indians turned 

1. The German for Lash was Losch. 

2. The German for Sides was Seitz. 



INDIAN WAR. 49 

some cattle into a cabbage yard cultivated by 
Henry Demuth at Storer's Point on the western 
side of the river. Seeing the cattle within the en- 
closure, Demuth and a neighbor went over in a 
boat to drive them out. As soon as they land- 
ed, they were attacked and Demuth was captured, 
and never being heard of afterwards was supposed 
to have been killed. His companion attempted 
to escape in the boat but was fired upon and 
killed. Jacob Sechrist, another man and a woman 
were killed on Dutch Neck. Sechrist has no de- 
scendants living. 

We have been to much trouble to ascertain 
the facts of these fatal encounters and though we 
may err somewhat in the details, we think the 
main points are correct. Many others suffered 
death or captivity at the hands of the savages, but 
their names are unknown. Whenever Indians 
were discovered lurking in the vicinity of the 
settlement, the inhabitants were warned by firing, 
to seek safety in the stockades. The few cattle 
they possessed strayed off in search of sub- 
sistence and became so wild that many were never 
recovered. 

Thus they lived till about 1760, when, after 
the capture of Quebec the Indians began to make 
proposals for peace, although the conclusive 
treaty between England and France was not sign- 
ed at Paris till February 1763. Work was now 



50 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

renewed upon the farms, and during the winter 
large quantities of cord wood were cut and hauled 
to landing either on hand-sleds or by horses and 
cars. It is said that one German matron hauled 
out. on a hand-sled, two sloop loads in one 
season. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

LIST OF EARLY SETTLERS. LAND CLAIMS. 

In 1760, after the return of peace, the Broad 
Bay settlement began to assume more the appear- 
ance of prosperity. The same year the County of 
Lincoln, which included all the territory eastward 
of Cumberland County, was formed, with Pownal- 
borough as the shire town. The settlement now 
embraced from ninety to a hundred families. 
After spending much time in its preparation, the 
following list of setders is presented: Joseph 
Ludwig and his two sons Jacob and Joseph Henry, 
James Schenck, a tanner, Jacob VVinchenbach, 
Christoval Woltzgruber, Anthony Hoffses, John 
Stahl, Charles Umberhine, Daniel Philhour, John 
Christopher Walleazor, Hans Peter Gross, a 
blacksmith, Frank Miller, a paper maker, Peter 
Leight, a wheelwright, Peter Sidelinger, Bernhard 
Ukkely, Conrad Seiders, Jacob Creamer, Michael 
Reid, John Godfrey Oberlack, John Weaver, C. 
Hoch, Valentine Mink, Frederick Heidenheim, 
Jacob Sidensberger, George Werner, Martin 
Demuth, George Kuhn, Christoval Storer, Henry 
Benner, John Newbit. Jacob Ulmer, John Ulmer, 
Peter Schwartz, John Woltz, Peter Miller, Michael 



52 ' ^ HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Eichhorn, George Hoch, Martin Hoch, John Welt, 
Christover Walck, William Kaler, George (or 
Peter) Pracht, George Clouse, David Genthner, 
Charles Leistner, David Rominger, (died in 
Bethabara, N.C., 1777.) Jacob Eichhorn, Zacharias 
Newbit, John Sidelinger, Andrew Woltz, John 
Walck, Christopher Newbit, T acob Re id , (died in 
Freidland, N. C, 18 19) Frederic Genthner, Henry 
Edgar, George Schmouse, Charles Heibner, Philip 

Chli^i^lE^'^ ^^S!^''' Pl}jli p RQ igi'^g:^^'- Mathias 
Remilee, John Michael Seitz, (died in Freidland, 
N. C, 181 7) Wilibaldus Kostner , Bernhard Kinsel, 
Frederick Kinsel, Joseph Comerer, John Labe, 
David Holtzopple, Charles, Broadman, Daniel 
Beckler, Samuel Fyler, George Lockenor, David 
Keveler, Francis Keizer, Christian Klein, Michael 
Rominger, (died in Friedland, N. C, 1803) Mel- 
chior Schneider, (died in Friedland, N. C, 1790) 

Borkhard, Schnaudeal, Henry 

Wagner, Philip Schuman, John Razor, John Adam 
Levensaler, a tailor (died in Boston) George 
Dolheim. These names were secured from old 
documents, family traditions, and from other 
sources. Some of the Christian names may be in- 
correct and some names may be overlooked en- 
tirely. So far as possible the original German 
spelling is preserved. As previously stated, Paul 
Losch (Lash), Lorenz Seitz, Jacob Seichrist, 



EARLY SETTLERS— LAND CLALMS. 53 

Henry Demiith and Bouzer, had been 

killed by the Indians. 

It is probable that no roads were made be- 
fore the incorporation of the town. People went 
afoot or on horseback. Not a frame building had 
been erected in the settlement. Cattle were 
scarce. Few potatoes were cultivated. Rye was 
the only bread stuff raised until Daniel Philhour 
commenced the cultivation of maize, or Indian 
corn, in 1764. This grain soon grew into much 
favor. Cabbage was raised and sour krout manu- 
factured from the first. Flax was raised and fur- 
nished the principal material for clothing and do- 
mestic articles, until the introduction of sheep 
when a mixture of flax and wool was used, pro- 
ducing cloth called linsey-woolsey. The getting 
out of wood and lumber provided the principal 
employment of the settlers. These were shipped 
to Boston in sloops.' 

In 1764, those who had taken up farms on 
the western side of the bay and river were molest- 
ed by claims of ownership by other parties. 
General Waldo either had an erroneous knowledge 
of the boundaries of the patent, or wilfully direct- 
ed the setders to occupy those lands. Even the 
river was not the western boundary. As estab- 
lished in 1786, the line constituting the western 
boundary of the Waldo Patent, started at the 



I. Annals of Warren. 



54 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

shore of the Storer farm on Broad Bay, and ran 
North, seven degrees East, ^il miles, and 60 rods. 
This Hne is mostly East of the Medomak river. 
In consequence of these claims a greater part of 
the settlers were without legal title to their lands. 
Walcjo's right of ownership being invalidated, the 
leases from him were worthless. Upon the dis- 
puted tract was also located their rude meeting 
house. The claim on the western side was made 
by Thomas Drowne in behalf of the Pemaquid 
Company. His rights to this claim are too com- 
plicated for explanation here. The Drowne line, 
so called and referred to in old deeds, extended 
from the lower falls (Sproul's dam) nearly West 
to Duck Puddle Pond, and the claim embraced 
all the lands South of that line and West of the 
river. The only course was to purchase their 
farms anew. Some fifty or sixty did this, pay- 
ing 2s, 8d per acre and securing deeds from 
Drowne. Under this settlement they were al- 
lowed to retain the lots assigned by Waldo for 
church and school purposes. 

After this came the heirs of John Brown of 
New Harbor, laying claim to other lands west of 
the river. These claims were not finally adjusted 
till 1804, when a commission appointed by the 
Massachusetts legislature, passed a resolve, 
proposing to all claimants to relinquish their 
rights to the disputed lands in Jefferson, Edge- 



EARLY SETTLERS— LAND CLALMS. 55 

comb, Newcastle, Nobleboro, Bristol, Boothbay 
and Waldoboro, to the State, and that the Gover- 
nor and Council would appoint three disinterested 
persons, not inhabitants of Massachusetts, or 
Maine, who should quiet the settlers in their lands 
by giving them deeds of their lots, upon the pay- 
ment of five dollars as a fee for each deed. This 
proposal was complied with and all the claimants 
relinquished to the commonvv^ealth their rights. 
The Commission awarded to the Plymouth Com- 
pany a township among the unlocated lands of the 
State. This Commission settled the last contro- 
vercy in Maine regarding land titles.' 

Nor were the settlers east of the river un- 
molested, for the heirs of Waldo, having discover- 
ed flaws in their titles, were harrassing them with 
unjust claims. 

Of the lots promised by Waldo for church 
and school purposes no deeds were given and 
they were never realized.^ 

Travel from the westward reached the river 
at "Light's Rock" where a ferry was maintained 
by Peter Light and his vvife previous to and 
through the period of the Revolution. All travel- 
ers and soldiers, passing east and west, crossed 
this ferry. The toll was a copper for a footman 
and three coppers for a man and horse. Madam 

1. Maine Historical Society's Collection, V'ol. II, page 192. 

2. Jacob Ludwig. 



56 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Light had the care of the ferry, the boats and the 
tolls/ The river was also crossed by fording just 
above the present lower bridge when the tide was 
out. Foot passengers for many years crossed the 
river on a boom where the Bulfinch bridge now 
spans the stream. 

About this time EngfHsh families first beean 
to settle at Broad Bay. Many of these purchased 
the farms vacated by those who removed to North 
Carolina. These people came from Massachusetts 
and among them may be mentioned, Waterman 
Thomas, Capt. Charles Sampson, Sen., Zebedee 
and Joseph Simmons, Levi Soule, Sen., Jabez 
Cole, E. Hunt, Capt. Andros, Michael Sprague, 
Church Nash, Cornelius Turner, Sen., John and 
Ezekiel Vinal, Joshua Howard, Sen., Kenlem 
Winslow, Samuel Sweetland, Thomas McGuyer, 
Edward Manning, Nathaniel Pitcher, (who came 
from Duxbury) Cornelius Turner, Jacob Stetson, 
James Hall, Capt. Charles Ewell, Abijah Water- 
man.^ William Farnsworth probably came earlier. 

Ship building was begun about the same 
time, and probably the first vessel was built by 
John Ulmer. On this craft James HalP was 

1. Juilge Groton. 

2. Abijah Waterman was drowne;! in the Medomak river. 

3. James Hall did not remain in Waldoboro long but took up a farm 
in Nobleboro, just over the Waldoboro line. He was the father of Stephen 
Hall and others. A large part of this farm is now owned by Frank 
Lawrence Embree, of New York, from whose summer residence is secured 
a beautiful view of Duck Puddle, or Hall's Pond. 



EARLY SETTLERS— LAND CLALMS. 57 

master workman. Hp was at that time the only 
man in this vicinity capable of launching a vessel. 
Hall afterwards removed to Nobleboro. Peter 
Cramer, a German, left Boston v/hen the English 
troops took possession, and settled here. Many 
erroneously consider this name a corruption of 
Creamer, but such is not the case unless the 
change was made previous to the settlement of 
Broad Bay. 



CHAPTER IX. 

EARLY RELIGIOUS MATTERS. FIRST MEETING HOUSE. 

The Broad Bay settlers were a pious and in- 
dustrious people of the German Lutheran faith. 
Religious services had been held in their homes 
regularly, but in 1760 they determined to build a 
meeting house. Two narratives of the building 
and dedication of this first house of worship have 
come to light, both of which are given and the 
reader can form his opinion as to which is correct. 

The first is the account of Judge Nathaniel 
Groton, published in a Bath newspaper previous 
to his death in 1758. His story is as follows: 

"Having determed to build a house they 
volunteered their services. They had no money 
and only such materials as they could provide 
themselves. The site selected for the house is 
about three miles south of the bridge on the west 
side of the bay, and now called Meeting House 
Cove. This place is a little west and north of 
Dutch Neck. Here they laid the foundation of 
the house, 28 by 36 feet. It was built of spruce 
and hemlock logs, hewn and dove-tailed at the 
corners to strengthen and keep up the walls which 
were 12 feet inside in the clear; the floor was of 



EARLY RELIGIOUS MATTERS. 



59 



hewn logs and as smooth as their German axes and 
other tools could make it ; the roof was of frame 
work covered with long pieces of stuff split out of 
logs and so laid on with birch bark that it was 










FIRST MEETING HOUSE. 

(From sketch by R. K. Benner.) 

guarded against letting in water. The pews were 
of logs hewn out. something like the old wooden 
horse blocks. The pulpit was the ornament of 
the House ; it stood about six feet from the floor 
and was ingeniously contrived, large enough to 
hold the preacher and so light that a strong man 
could carry it. It was at the top semicircular ; the 
front was of plated work and gracefully centered 
to a point below. The pulpit ten years after the 
house was built, was painted by one Isaac 
Sargers,' who was the first of his trade at Broad 

I. The late Charles Miller learned his trade of Isaac Sargers. 



60 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Bay. The windows at first were made of sheep- 
skin." 

Near the House and to the east thereof was 
the burying ground where sleep undisturbed and 
forgotten, many of those early German Pilgrims. 

"It was not till after the treaty of peace be- 
tween France and England had been signed in 
Paris in 1763, that the scattered population dared 
to leave their homes and garrisons and assemble 
in the house of God before described. Rev. John 
Martin Shaeffer filled the pulpit on that occasion. 
The small house was crowded. The choir was 
organized by Frank Miller, Sen., and composed 
of male and female singers. Among the youngest 
was Conrad Heyer, then about fifteen years old. 
The service was all in the German language. 
Dr. Shaefifer read from the 137th Psalm and 
preached from the 5th and 6th verses of the same. 
These pious people, many of whom in their own 
country, had worshipped in gorgeous churches, re- 
joiced that they were after so many years, per- 
mitted to assemble in their rude built meeting 
house and worship the same God under the same 
form of religion they did in Germany." 



The other story is from the historical sketch 
of the Moravian Mission at broad Bay, Maine, by 
John W. Jordan, and is as follows: 

"Among the carpenters employed in the 



EARL V RELIGIO U8 MA TTERS. G 1 

erection of the Single Brethren's House at 
Herrnhaag, was Hans George Hahn.' Leaving 
there in 1 743 he proceeded to Revilen in Franken 
**-5rvc-x-*^t-:5- ^vhere he was married. After the lapse 
of a few years the young couple resolved to go to 
Pennsylvania and settle in the vicinity of a Mora- 
vian congregation, but it so happened that the 
vessel on which they sailed had her original des- 
tination changed to Boston, where they landed, 
and, hearing of the German settlement at Broad 
Bay, ^-**^-* they proceeded thither in a coasting 
vessel. After making his home at Broad Bay, 
Hahn held religious meetings and read sermons. 
Through the efforts of Hahn and his wife, George 
Soelle and Samuel Herr were prevailed upon to 
visit Broad Bay, arriving in August, 1760. After 
a brief stay Soelle went to Litchfield and to 
Bethelhem, N. C. In August, 1762, Soelle^ re- 
turned to Broad Bay and offered to assumed 
spiritual of them. It was determined to erect a 
meeting house at once. 

1. When Hans George Hahn came to Broad Bay, he brought with 
him a poor but educated young man named OrfF, or Orph. For the proper 
pronunciation of Hahn, give the ah the usual English sound, but it is 
usually pronounced Han. Hahn had four sons grown up. They were 
George, Philip, John and Frederick. Two remained here, one went to 
North Carolina and later to Virginia, and one went to New Hampshire. 
He also had an adopted daughter. 

2. Eaton in Annals of Warren says : "This year a Moravian 
minister by the name of Cilly, came from Germany to Broad Bay, and^ 
preaching a more spiritual and less worldly-minded religion, converted, 
many of the settlers to the Moravian faith. 



62 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

"In the meantime Rev. John Martin Shaeffer 
had arrived from New York and had been engaged 
by some of the settlers. 

"Seven famiHes began to build the meeting 
house. Soelle preached in this house and also to 
the Eno^lish settlers at Broad Cove. 

"When Shaeffer, who had been away, returned 
in'^November, (1762) and saw the progress made 
by Soelle, he at once began to circulate scandals 
against the Moravian church, stating it was 
rumored that Soelle had been stoned out of 
Philadelphia and escorted from Newport, R. I., by 
the town constable. 

"The log meeting house being completed, 
Bro.' Soelle held the first service Dec. 12, 1762. 
Text. Ephesians 3:17. A love feast followed. 
Christmas day was appropriately celebrated, and 
the last day of the year closed with prayer." 

Soelle himself wrote : "The year 1 763 closed 
with unrest and disquietude. Some of the settlers 
objected to two clergymen in so small a com- 
munity, and some said they wanted no Herrn- 
huters,- that my hearers should join Shaeffer and 
contribute to his support. Bro. Hahn became the 

1. In the Moravian church the preacher did not have the title 
"Reverend" but was known as "Brother." 

2. In 1722 a small company of Moravian refugees received permis- 
sion from Count Zinzendorf to settle on his estate. To this settlement 
they gave the name of Herrnhut, whence they are commonly known in 
Germany as "Herrnhutters." 



EARL V RELIGIO US MA TTERS. ( ; 3 

target of their missiles. Yet we kept the even 
tenor of our waj/s, but it was a time of trouble. 
45-^^**4f Preparations were made to send me and 
Bro. Hahn on shipboard to Boston ; to this end in 
February demanded my pass. In April the tumult 
increased." 

"On May loth Bro. Hahn and I, under escort 
of thirty or forty men, were taken away and held 
as prisoners for a whole day while our members 
waited for us in the church. **«•*** For the bal- 
ance of the year we had peace." 

Finally Soelle's persecutors became suspicious 
of Shaeffer's walk and conversation, which was 
increased by a copy of Christopher Sauer's news- 
paper, which had been sent to the settlement, 
containing notice from Shaeffer's wife whom 
he had deserted. In consequence ten families 
left him. Shaeffer accused Hahn of circulating- 
the newspaper and had him arrested because six 
years before he had baptized children. 

The members of the Moravian Mission at the 
close of 1764 were as follows: 

Michael and Catherine Rominger. (Michael 
Rominger was born in Wurtemburg in 1709, died 
at Friedland, N. C, 1803.) 

John Philip and Catherine Vogler. (John 
Philip Vogler was born in the Palatinate in 1725, 
died at Bethania, N. C, in 1790.) 

David and Catherine Rominger. (David 



64'^' HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

was born in Wurtemburg in 1716, died at Betha- 
bara, N. C, in 1777.) 

Matthew and Susannah Seitenburger, 

Nicholas and Margaret Orph, 

David and Catherine Holsafel, 

and Catherine Wagner, 

John Michael and Elizabeth Seitz. (John 
Michael was born in Wurtemburg in 1737, came 
to Broad Bay in 1759, died at Friedland, N. C. in 

1817.) 

David and Margaret Kerbel, 

John, George and Barbara Hahn, 

Adam Schumacher, 

Michael Jung, 

Wilabaldus and Justina Castner, 

Peter and Elizabeth Kroehn. 

Of the Broad Bay settlers and their lands 
Soelle recorded: "They are as poor as church 
mice and the land is not rich. Most of the peo- 
ple have been here twelve years, five of which 
they spent in barracks. They all have large 
families. They cannot plow; and if they wish to 
sow rye, they must use the hoe to stir up the soil. 
Their flour they obtain in Boston. The severe 
winters also operate against them." 

George Soelle, prior do uniting with the 
Moravian church, was ordained to the ministry, 
Sept. 3, 1 74 1, at Rippen, in Schleswig by the 
Danish Bishop, Hans Adolph Brodersen. In this 



EARL y RELIGIO US MA TTERS. 65 

country he preached in German and English. He 
was never married. He died in Salem, N. C, 
May 4, 1773. 



CHAPTER X. 

EXODUS TO NORTH CAROLINA. 

The Moravian Mission at Broad Bay was the 
only one oro^anized in Maine. 

In May, 1767, Soelle was recalled to Penn- 
sylvania, after a service of five years at Broad Bay. 
A petition was immediately forwarded to the Con- 
ference at Bethlehem, requesting his reappoint- 
ment. Two months later (Sept. 28, 1767) he 
returned and was heartily welcomed. Shaeffer 
having withdrawn/ Soelle's labors were greatly 
blessed by the Lord. 

In the meantime members of the mission had 
heard of the Moravian tract in North Carolina, of 
its o-enial climate and fertile soil, and on Soelle's 
return he found a large number bent on removing 
thither. In April Soelle wrote to Bishop Nathan- 
iel Seidel "The people are still determined to go 
to North Carolina and have been so since Septem- 
ber last." 

In August, 1769, the following five families 
sailed for North Carolina: 

Schumacher and five children, 

I. This appears somewhat misleading as Shaefier was in the settle- 
ment much later. 



EXODUS TO NORTH CAROLINA. G7 

Seitz and three children, 

Hahn and adopted daughter, 

Rominger and wife, 

Kroehn and three children. 

They proceeded to Boston whence they 
sailed for Wilminorton. Within a short distance 
of that port the vessel was wrecked. Passengers 
and crew were saved. After a tedious journey 
they finally reached their destination and were 
kindly cared for at Salem and Bethabara. 

Sept. 5, 1770, Soelle and five more families 
left Broad Bay and arrived in North Carolina, 
Nov. 6th. They were Jacob Reid, Michael Ro- 
minger, Melchior Schneider and John Philip 
Vogeler. Others appear to have gone later, 
among whom may be mentioned George Lochenor, 
Frederick Lochenor, David Holtzopple, Bernhard 
Kinsel and Anthony Castne r, who outlived seven su.. ">^ ^' 
wives. Many of the descendants of those people y^ )^'^« ' . ' 
are living in that vicinity.^ ^u^ ^lltl4^'^*- 

Mr. A. R. Reed of VValdoboro, has the *'^^* Q^^.^fsu^^ 
original passport given Bernard Kinsel when he ^..j^^^;,^^^ <cr 
went to North Carolina. Following is a copy : hvOiU-it.^^*^ "KC 

Broad Bay, ss. Lincoln Coun-h', t^ lv*o,i7b«'' 

August, 26, 1772. 

These are to certify that Bernhard Kinsel, a 

I . Elizabeth Vogelcr, the last survivor of those who \\ent from Broad 
Bay to North Carolina, died near Friedland, April 7, 1S55, at the advanced 
age of eighty-five years. The family name in Maine has been changed to 
Fogler. 



68 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

German, has been a wholesome Inhabitant in this 
Place for the Space of about Eighteen Years, and 
That he has lived quiet and peaceable with his 
Neighbors, and behaved hims^elf as a Christian 
ought to do, and as he purposses to depart from 
this Place pr Carolina, we have upon his Desire 
Subscribed this. The Allmighty grant him a 
prosperous Voyage & bless his Purpose. 

Christo. nicho. Homever, 

B. A. & Candidate. 

Oeorge Storer, 
his 

George X Rode, 
mark 

Another name not legible 
From this account it does not appear that 
Soelle exerted any undue influence to induce those 
people to leave Broad Bay for North Carolina, but 
rather being disappointed with the climate, 
deceived by Waldo and his agents and indignant 
at the persistant ill-treatment they had received in 
temporal as well as spiritual matters, they resolved 
to seek a more desirable place of residence. 

Although the settlement lost by this emigra- 
tion several families, among them some of its best 
citizens, yet the statement of Holmes and 
Williamson and repeated by Eaton, that three 
hundred families left, is absurd, for there is no 



EXODUS TO NORTH CAROLINA. G9 

evidence that even half that number had settled at 
Broad Bay. 

Some of these families were not satisfied with 
the change and the next spring, (March, 1773) 
retraced their steps and rejoined their relatives 
and friends who received them with joyful hearts. 
Among those who returned were Michael Reid 
and Barnard Kinsel.' When the latter left North 
Carolina, he received a passport from the 
authorities of which the following is a copy: 
North Carolina, Surry County, 

Mertch the 12th, 1773. 

Where as Barnard Kinsel did this day Crave 
A pas port and did produs a sufisent sertificat 
from Brod Bay in the Govrment of New ingland, 
and has in thes nighbourhood with his wif and 
four childrin thes thre month and have Believed 
them selve Onestly and Soberly and nothing Let 
to ther Charg Known to me the Present Magstret. 

Where as the Berer, Barnard Kinsel, is about 
to Remove himself and femaly fr Brod Bay in New 
ingland government where he Came from. We 
ther for send Gritting to all Shirriffs, Constabels 
and others of his Magesty's ofisers, Requering you 
and Evry of )ou to sufre the Berer hereof to Pass 
thither so as he do not show himself ofensif to his 
Magesty's Laws. 

I. Mrs. John Weaver was a daughter of Barnard Kinsel and was ten 
years old when they returned. From her many of the matters of this 
early history were obtained pre%'ious to her death. 



70 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Atested by me one of his Magesty's Justices 
for the aforsed county. 

Robert Walker, J. P. 

On his return Barnard Kinsel located on the 
farm in Nobleboro, bordering on Duck Puddle 
pond, afterwards owned by Michael Vannah. 
Upon this farm he planted a butternut which grew 
to be a tree of majestic proportions and was for 
years an object to be seen for many miles around. 
Beneath its spreading branches were buried the 
remains of Barnard Kinsel,' his wife and several 
children. 

About this time the population of the growing 
settlement v/as increased by the arrival of a 
number of English families from Massachusetts. 
Many of them purchased the farms vacated by 
their owners, who had removed to North Caro- 
lina. Among these arrivals were Waterman 
Thomas, Capt. Charles Sampson, Capt. Charles 
Ewell, Zebedee and Joseph Simmons, Levi Soule, 
Jabez Cole, E. Hunt, Captain Andros, Michael 
Sprague, Church Nash, Cornelius Turner, John 
and Ezekiel Vinal, Joshua Howard, Kenlem 
Winslow, Jacob Stetson and James Hall. William 
Farnsworth probably came a little earlier. 

Frame houses began to take the place of the 
log huts which had been the only shelter of the 
first settlers. One of the oldest houses of this 

I. Bainhaid Kinsel was the great-grandfather of A. R. Reed, Esq. 



EXODUS TO NORTH CAROLINA. 71 

character still standing, is the one on the west side, 
known as the "Smouse House." It was built by 
David Holtzopple, who emigrated from Broad Bay 
to North Carolina. It is therefore nearly one 
hundred and forty years old. It has a frame with 
plank walls. 

Work was also begun on the frame building 
near Light's Ferry on the east side of the river, 
which was later removed to its present site and 
known as "The Old German Meeting House." 



CHAPTER XI. 

INCORPORATION OF THE TOWN OF WALDOHOROIXIH, 

In 1773 the population of Broad Bay had 
increased to such an extent that it was deemed 
expedient for the pubHc welfare to take steps to 
hav^e the settlement incorporated into a town. 
Accordingl)- the Germans and recently arrived 
English united in a petition to the General Court 
of Massachusetts for that purpose. Jacob Ludwig, 
who, besides being able to speak English, was a 
man of excellent judgment, was selected to present 
the petition. He proceeded to Boston by water, 
taking passage on one of the small coasters then 
employed carrying wood to that place. The 
petition was favorably considered and on the 
twenty-ninth day of June, 1773, the General 
Court, as the Legislature was called, passed an act 
incorporating the plantation of Broad Bay into a 
town, which, in honor of its founder, was named 
Waldoborough.' This occurred when Thomas 

I. This is a compound word, derived from the primitives Waldo and 
borough, meaning simply Waldo town. Formerly the termination was 
written in full, but that style has become obsolete, and for many years the 
last three letters have been dropped. Webster and Worcester hoth pro- 
nounce the word Wa7vl-d£r-bur-rer, accented on the first and third sylla- 
ble. 



WALDOBOROUGH INCORPORATED. 73 

Hutchinson' was Governor of the Province of 
Massachusetts Bay and the same year that the tea 
was thrown overboard in Boston Harbor, Waldo- 
boro was the thirty-second town incorporated in 
Maine, and one of the first in this region, New- 
castle having been incorporated in 1753, Booth- 
bay in 1764 and Bristol in 1765. Following is 
the act of incorporation : 

Ax Act for Incorporating a Plantation called 

Broad Bay into a town by the Name of 

Waldoborough : 

Whereas the inhabitants of the Plantation called 

Broad Bay, in the County of Lincoln, 

have represented to this Court that they 

labour under orreat difficulties and incon- 

veniences by reason of their not being 

incorporated into a Town, therefore 

"Be it enacted by the Governor, Council and 

"House of Representatives, the said Plantation, 

"commonly called and known by the name of 

"Broad Bay, bounded as follows, viz, to begin at the 

"north west corner bound of the town of Bristol, 

"in said County at a stake standing on the bank 

"of the Duck Puddle Brook, so called, thence run- 

"ning northerly by said Brook and Pond to the 

"northerly end of said Pond, to a Pine Tree 

I. The next year Governor Hutchinson, in disgust at the people's 
opposition to his administration, left for England and Gen. Thomas Gage 
become his successor. 



74 HISTORY OF U'ALDOBORO. 

"marked on four sides, thence to run north five 
"hundred and sixty rods to a Pine Tree marked on 
"four sides, thence to run north, twenty-two 
"degrees and thirty minutes east, seventeen hun- 
"dred rods to a Spruce Tree marked on four sides, 
"thence to run east south east eleven hundred and 
"twenty rods to a Birch Tree marked on four 
"sides, thence to run south, seven degrees east, 
"sixteen hundred rods to a Maple Tree marked on 
"four sides, thence to run south, nineteen degrees 
"west, nine hundred and six rods to a Spruce Tree 
"marked on four sides, thence to run south east 
"one hundred and sixty rods to a Fir Tree marked 
"on four sides, thence to run south, fifteen degrees 
"east, three hundred and twenty rods to a stake 
"standing on the bank of Little Pond, so called, 
"thence easterly by the shore of said Pond to the 
"easterly part thereof, thence south, fifteen degrees 
"east, to a stake standing on the bank of South- 
"erly Pond, so called, thence easterly by the shore 
"of said Pond to the easterly part thereof, thence 
"south, fifteen degrees east, one hundred rods to 
"a Spruce Tree marked on four sides, thence run- 
"ning south, twelve degrees west, three hundred 
"and twenty rods to a Spruce Tree marked on four 
"sides, thence running north west four hundred 
"rods to Goose River, so called, thence southerly 
"down said River, in the middle thereof, to its 
"entrance into the Bav, thence round the Back 



WALDOBOROUGH INCORPORATED. 75 

"Cov^e, so called, thence to continue by the shore 
"southerly and westerly to the southerly Part of 
"Passage Point, otherwise called Jonese's Neck, 
"thence westerly across the Narrows of Broad Bay 
"river until it strikes the southerly part of Haver- 
"ner's Point, so called, thence westerly round the 
"shore of said Point and northerly by the shore of 
"the eastern branch of Broad Cove, thence round 
"the head of said cove westerly and southerly 
"until it comes to a Red Oak Tree standing on the 
"land of Jacob Eaton, being the easterly corner 
"bound of the Town of Bristol aforesaid, thence to 
"run North westerly on said line of Bristol to the 
"first mentioned Bounds; be and hereby is erected 
"into a township by the name of VValdoborough,and 
"that the inhabitants thereof be and hereby are 
"invested with all the powers, privileges and im- 
"munities which the inhabitants of the Towns 
"within this Province respectively do or by ought 
"to enjoy. 

"x-Xnd be it further enacted that Alexander 
"Nichols, Esq., Be and he hereby is impowered to 
"issue his warrant directed to some principal in- 
"habitant in said tov/nship, to notify and warn the 
"inhabitants in said township to meet at such time 
"and place as shall be therein set forth, to chuse 
"all such officers as shall be necessary to manage 
"the affairs of said town. At which said first 
"meeting ail the then Present male Inhabitants 



76 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

"arrived to twenty-one years of age shall be 
"admitted to vote. 

A true copy of an act passed the General 
Court the 29th day of June. 1773, 

Thomas Fluker. Secretary. 
A true copy attest, 

Jacob Ludwig, Town Clerk. 
By virtue of the act of incorporation Alexan- 
der Nichols of Bristol, in due time issued the 
following warrant, calling the first town meeting : 
LINCOLN, SS. Bristol, September 2. 1773. 
, — ^ — > BY Vertue of an act of the General 
Court, I Do hereby appoint I\Ir 



' ■ '' Andrew Shanck of the town of W^al- 
doboro in sd. County to Notify and 
warn the Inhabitants in sd. Township to meet at 
the westerlv meetinof House in sd. Town, on 
Tuesday, the twenty first Day of this month, to 
Chuse all Sush ofificers as shall be necessary to 
manage the affairs of sd. Town. At which sd. 
first meeting all the then Present male Inhabitants 
arrived to Twenty one years of age shall be 
admitted to vote. 

itly, To Chuse and \'ote for a moderator to 
regulate sd. meeting. 

2tly, To Chuse and Vote for a Town Clark. 

3tly. To Chuse and \''ote for a Town Treshry. 

4tly, To Chuse and Vote for Selectmen. 

5tly. To \'ote for all Town officers as the 
Law Directs. 



WALDOBOROUGH INCORPORATED. 77 

6tly, To See if the Town will Vote to be 
warned by Putting up the warrants. 

ALEX'R NICKELS, 

Justice of Peace. 

i\ccordingly on the 21st day of September, 
1773, the legal voters of the town of Waldo- 
borough assembled in the log meeting house at 
meeting house cove and made choice of Water- 
man Thomas for Moderator. The following town 
officers were then elected: 

Jacob Ludwig, Toiun Clerk. 

David Vinal, Town Treasurer. 

David Vinal, \ 

Christopher Newbert, V Selectmen. 

John Weaver, j 

After voting that the selectmen also serve as. 
assessors, the meeting was adjourned to meet the 
next day at 10 o'clock in the forenoon, when the 
remainder of the officers were chosen as follows: 

Phillip Shuman, | Constables. 

John Hunt, j 

Frank Miller, ^ 

Jacob Achorn, ( Siirveyors 

Adam Levensaler, [ of Highways. 

Abijah Waterman, ) 

Henry Stahl, "] 

Christian Kline, ! ^^^^^^ Viewers. 

Henry Creamer, | 

Nathan Soule, j 

Jabez Cole ) ^^ j^^ j^^^^^^ 

Conrad Seiders, j -^ ^ 



78 HISTORY OF VVALDOBORO. 

Daniel Filhour, 



T 1 . ^- , r JVardciis. 

Ludvvig Castner, 

Jacob Achorn, Deai-reeve, 

Mathias Sidensberger, Leather Sealer 

Nathaniel Simmons, Sealer of JJ^eiglifs & 

Aleasiires. 

Abijah Waterman, Surveyor of Lumber. 

John Fogler, "| 

Wm. Kaler. \ Hayivards. 

Andrew Waltz, J 

Bernhard Ukkelv, ) „ / r' , 
JohnNewbert, \ Pound Keepers. 

Peter Gross, ] ^r 

« , e. r Moizreeves. 

Andrew btorer, j "^ 

Paul Lash, Culler of Fish. 

Nathan Soule, "to tack keer that the fish have 
a free Bass." 

The act of incorporation and the preceedings 
of every town meeting from 1773 to 1801, are re- 
corded in the first volumn of Town Records, and 
all subsequent records have been preserved un- 
broken down to the present time. Jacob Ludwig 
the first town clerk served in that capacity till 1 784, 
with the exception of the year 1775, when David 
Vinal officiated. He was again chosen clerk in 1787 
and served till 1789 when Jabez Cole was chosen 
and served till 1794, when Jacob Ludwig again 
filled the office one year. P>om 1795 to the end 
of the volume the records were kept by Thomas 
McGuyer. These town clerks, especially Ludwig 



WALDOBOROUGH INCORPORATED. 79 

and McGuyer, wrote fair and legible hands and 
their records compare favorably with those of the 
present time. Considering the disadvantages 
under which he labored, it is surprising that Jacob 
Ludwig acquired a sufficient knowledge of the 
English language to record the transactions of the 
town so intelligibly as he did. Though generally 
exact in his words, he always wrote "achurnt" for 
adjourned, "warnt" for warned and "kear" for care. 
John Martin, of Bristol, who was said to have 
been the only man in this vicinity competent to 
perform that duty, was emplo)'ed to make a survey 
and establish the bounderies of the town. At a 
meeting held Oct. 19, 1773, the town voted to pay 
him ^5 15s. lod. for his services. 

Eaton states that under this survey the 
courses, distances and monuments were so in- 
correct that it was impossible to follow them, 
which gives countenance to the story that the 
surveying party took with them too much liquor 
for the nature of the work. This incorrect survey 
was afterwards the cause of some dispute between 
Waldoboro and Warren, which was arranged by 
mutual consent and the line surveyed and marked 
by James Malcolm. This line was again called in 
question by the authorities of Waldoboro. Finally 
in 1836 the Supreme Court appointed Hon. Jona- 
than Cilly, John S. Abbott and Lucius Barnard, 
Commissioners to establish the line. Their report 



80 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

was adopted and the line so established was 
accepted. Otherwise the bounderies of the town 
remain practically as originally surveyed/ 

Among the first acts of the town was the 
establishment of highways. March r6, 1774 three 
roads were laid out. One was from the Bristol line 
to Peter Pracht's bridge; another from George 
Heibner's on Dutch Neck to join the Bristol road 
above the meeting house, or at Eugley's Corner; 
another from J. Oberlack's to Nathaniel Simmon's 
on the East side. 

In May, 1774, the road on the west side was 
extended from Peter Pracht's (Prock) to Mr. 
Schmouse's March 4, 1776, a road was established 
from Back Cove to the road previously laid out on 
the east side. 

For several years the town declined to appro- 
priate money for schools, but April 4, 1780, a vote 
was passed to raise money for a school, or schools, 
and the selectmen were instructed to "regulate 
the schools in four quarters." At the same meet- 
ing it was voted that every man work two days on 
the highways. 

In 1778 the town passed a vote prohibiting 
rams from running at large "at unseason'able time 
in the year." 

About this time the town voted several times 
not to act concerning the form of government. 

I. Page 148, Annals of Warren; also Frank Bulfinch, Esq. 



WALDOBOROUGH INCORPORATED. 81 

This vote refers to a State Constitution, which had 
been reported and was now submitted to the peo- 
ple and rejected. 

The town continued to vote not to send a 
representative to the General Court, till May 8, 
1782, when Jacob Ludwig was chosen representa- 
tive. 

Town meetings were held part of the time in 
the meeting house at the cove or "westerly meet- 
ing house," and at other times in the new meet- 
inof house on the east side. As these town meet- 
ings were conducted in English, a language with 
which few of the voters were familiar, the speeches 
must have been a queer mixture of German and 
broken English. 



CHAPTER XII. 

^VALDOBORO DURING THE REVOLUTION. 

The German emigrants, who settled this town 
were generally warm friends to the cause of civil 
and religious rights ; for, to obtain these, was one 
of the principal motives which induced their re- 
moval from the father-land. But through what 
difificulties and dangers had they passed to insure 
for themselves and their descendants, the enjoy- 
ment of those rights! And now when the worst, 
as they supposed, had been endured, when the 
once feeble plantation had jujrt begun to feel the 
benefit and security of an incorporate town, the 
mutterings of another and darker storni were being 
heard. With the principal events of the American 
Revolution every school boy is familiar; with such 
particulars of it, as relate to the history of Waldo- 
boro, comparatively few are conversant. To those 
we now intend to call your attention. In May 
1776, the Provincial Congress enacted that all civil 
and military documents should, after the first day 
of June, be "In the name of the Government and 
People of Massachusetts Bay in New England," 
without any mention, whatever, of the British 
Sovereign. But Waldoboro had anticipated this 



WALDOBORO DURING REVOLUTION. 83 

action of the Legislature by totally ignoring "His 
Majesty" in the warrant for the March meeting of 
that year. 

Following the action of a large number of the 
eastern towns, Waldoboro, on the 8th of April, 
1776, chose a Committee of Correspondence and 
Safety. The members of this committee were 
Bernhard Shuman, Jacob Eichhorn, Solomon 
Hewett, Jacob Umberhind, Bernhard Ukkley, 
Caleb Hewett and John Weaver. Their duties 
were to correspond with other towns, and to con- 
cert measures for the public defense. Previous to 
this the town had united with other settlements in 
petitions to the Provincial Congress, calling atten- 
tion to the general distress prevailing on account 
of the great scarcity of provisions, and the 
exposure of the inhabitants to the depredations of 
the enemy from lack of arms and ammunition. The 
town had also voted to petition the General Court 
to relieve them of their Province rate, as they 
were "at so much Charge in Getting into Town 
Regulations." 

The Declaration of Independence was printed 
and sent to all the ministers of the Gospel in the 
State, to be publicly read by them on the first 
Lord's day after its reception, and to be recorded 
by the town clerks in their respective bo(>ks. 
Neither of these requests were carried out in 
Waldoboro. Dr. Schaeffer, to whom we have 



84 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

before alluded, was the minister at the time and 
would neither read it nor allow it read in the old 
meeting house, the only public place then in 
Waldoboro, Through the influence of Jacob 
Ludwig and Andrew Schenck, it was translated 
into the German language and by them read to 
the people, who everywhere received it with 
rejoicing. 

Such was the exposed condition of the eastern 
coast that during the earlier years of the war, 
Lincoln County was allowed to use her men for 
coast service, though some had enlisted, and 
among them, Conrad Heyer, who was in the army 
at Cambridge at the time of the battle of Bunker 
Hill. Capt. Jacob Ludwig, who had attained some 
distinction in the French and Indian wars, raised 
a company in this town and Warren. On the 
third of November, 1776, they embarked for 
Machias, were on duty there through the winter, 
and returned after an absence of six months. The 
militia were frequently called out for the protec- 
tion of exposed points, and in 1777, Capt. Ludwig 
raised another company. A copy of the pay roll 
of this company shows that, William Farnsworth 
was I St and Jacob Winchenbach, 2nd Lieutenant, 
Caleb Howard, Sergeant, and among the privates 
from this town were Wm. Miller, Godfrey Hoffses, 
Henry Oberlock, Valentine Mink, John Winchen- 



WALDOBORO DURING REVOLUTION. 85 

bach and Isaac Sargus. This company was in 
service from Oct. 7 to Dec. 20, 1777. 

Upon the opening of this year it became 
known that Gen. Burgoyne was about to invade 
the country from the North, and every exertion 
was made to enhst men to arrest his advance. 
Waldoboro voted on the 2 2d of April to pay ten 
pound lawful money "for each man 'listing in town 
for three years or during the war," a phraseology 
with which we became very familiar during our 
"late unpleasantness." Early in the season of 
1777, Lieut. Col. Dummer Sewall, of Georgetown 
(now Bath) , came to Waldoboro to enlist as many 
men as he could for the continental service. At 
this time there were two organized militia com- 
panies in town, the one on the east side command- 
ed by Capt. Schenck, that on the west side under 
the command of Capt. Ludwig, both true to the 
cause of liberty. Col. Sewall, after crossing 
Light's Ferry, rode down to Schenck's Point, and 
requested the Captain to immediately call out his 
company. So that all might understand, the men 
were addressed by the Colonel in English and 
then by Capt. Schenck in German. Peter Light, 
John Fitzgerald, George Sidensberger, Isaiah 
Cole and Barney Freeman volunteered at once. 
Col. Sewall then made the same request of Capt. 
Ludwig, and upon the assembly of his company 
they were addressed in both languages, and 



m HISTORY OF U'ALDOBORO, 

Charles Heibner, Charles Walch ainl Georoe 
Leistner were enlisted. The men proceeded to 
Bath on foot, where the)- were armed and 
equipped, giving their individual receipts for the 
same. They then took up their line of march for 
the army of Gen. Gates, and were all present 
under his command at the surrender of Burgoyne, 
Oct. 1 7, 1777. These prisoners, mostly Hessians,' 
were placed in camp near Boston, and not a few 
of those who escaped or were parolled found their 
way to Waldoboro. Among them, was Dr. Theo- 
bald, a Surgeon and Chaplain. He preached and 
practiced medicine hereabout three years, when he 
removed to Pownalboro. Dr. John G. Borneman 
was another and also John Peter Walter. The 
latter was born in Brunswick, Germany, 1754, died 
in Waldoboro in 1S30. He came to Bath with 
General McCobb. He came to Waldoboro and 
married Mar)- Waltzgrover, a half-sister of Conrad 
Heyer. John Peter Walter was an educated man, 
proficient in several languages. His name was 
probably Walder or Walther.' 

Owinor to the continual decline in the value 
of the currency, towns were called upon to 
furnish supplies of clothing and provisions for the 



1. England sent 29,000 Hessians and 1 7,000 returned. The remain- 
ing 12.000. were either killed or stayed in this countr}* and became citizens. 
Gen. George A. Custer was the great grandson of a Hessian officer. 

2. Frank B. Miller. 



WALDOBORO DURING REVOLUTION. 87 

army in place of money. May 7th, 1778, Waldo- 
boro chose a committee of twelve to procure cloth- 
ing "for the Soldiers in Continental Ser\-ice." At 
the annual meeting, March i6th, 1777, it was 
voted to pay for this clothing, the bill being £6'] 
8s. 

The enemy having taken possession of Biguy- 
duce, now Castine, the State in concurrence with 
Congress, took steps to dislodge them. As a 
portion of the force, a draft was miade from the 
militia of Lincoln County, to the numiber of 600 
men. Those from this town, served in Capt. 
Philip M. Ulmer's company of Col. McCobb's 
regiment. The pay-roll of this company shows 
the names of Sergt. Joshua Howard, and the fol- 
lowing privates: 

Jacob Achorn, John Achorn, 

Michael Achorn, John Hunt, 

John Ulmer,' Chris'r Newbit, 

John Varner, Martin Hoch, 

Jos. Simmons, George Hoch. 

Paul Mink, Jacob Genthner, 

John Welt Peter Orff, 

Valentine Mink, Charles Kaler, 

Peter Wichenbach, Chris'r Walk, 

Henry Oberlock, Geo. Hoffses, 

John Benner. Isaac Sargus, 

who were probably all from Waldoboro. Christo- 
pher Xewbit lost an arm in the attack on Biguy- 



88 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

duce. The disastrous result of that ill-managed 
expedition is a matter of histor)-. 

George Hoch and John Welt were induced 
by promises of bounties of land and money to join 
the English at Castine. Soon seeing their error, 
they deserted, were captured, tried by court- 
martial and sentenced to receive each a thousand 
stripes save one. Welt died under the lash. 
Hoch survived, but bore to the day of his death, 
at the age of 99 years, the marks of that terrible 
punishment. 

The close proximity of the enem)- caused the 
milita to be called out frequentl)-. and Capt. 
Ludwig and a company of seventeen men were 
again called into service. They did dut}- on the 
Medom.ak river from Sept. to Oct. 1779. 

May 22, 1780, the town voted to raise money 
to pay the soldiers, who enlisted last Ma)- for 
eight months and Oct. 28, 1780, it was voted to 
raise money to pay for 360 lbs. of beef for the 
army. 

This community like all others in the country 
had its tories who were every ready to give any 
information to the enemy likely to injure the 
patriots. During the haying season of 1780. a 
party of four tories came from the eastward, in 
the night, guided by one of their number by the 
name of Pendleton, and secreted themselves in 
Capt. Levi Soul's barn. This barn occupied the 



WALDOBORO DURING REVOLUTION. 89 

spot where John F, Soule's barn now stands. When 
Capt. Soule went to feed his cattle before day, he 
was made a prisoner. Being in his shirt sleeves, 
he gained permission to go to the house to see 
his sick wife and get his coat. Closely guarded, 
with his arms pinioned, he went to his wife's 
room. Having obtained a large knife which lay 
on the table Soule approached the bed and told 
her to cut the cords confining his hands behind 
him. Pendleton threatened to fire if he persisted 
in freeing himself. Soule's reply was, "Cut!" 
Pendleton then shot him dead, the same bullet 
breaking one of Mrs. Soule's fingers. Fearing 
the firing might have raised an alarm, the party 
were glad to make their escape. The feelings of 
the poor woman cannot be described. She was 
wont to relate the story to her descendants, show- 
ing her crooked finger as evidence of its truthful- 
ness. Capt. Soule's body was buried on the farm 
owned by the late Capt. Andrew Storer, but the 
exact locality is not known. Stephen Pendleton, 
the perpetator of this deed, lived in Searsmont 
after the war. Another party made an unsuccess- 
ful attempt to capture Capt. Charles Sampson, a 
staunch friend of liberty, on the eastern side. 

The coast was infested with marauders from 
the provinces east of Maine and by tories nearer 
home. Of the latter class, one Nathaniel Palmer, 
of Broad Cove, who, about this time (1780), was 



90 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

belived to be the leader of a small gang of pirates 
infesting the islands of Muscongus Bay and com- 
mitting their depredations upon coasting vessels, 
falling in their way, thus adding to the depriva- 
tions of the people. For this, and probably other 
similar offenses, he was arrested and tried at 
Thomaston, by court martial, by order of Gen. 
Peleg Wadsworth, who had commanded this dis- 
trict. He was condemned, and the penalty was 
undoubtedly death by hanging, but made his es- 
cape from the barn in which he was confined at 
Wadsworth's headquarters, before the sentence 
pronounced upon him could be executed. He was 
handcuffed, but succeded in removing the mana- 
cles by twisting off a board nail with his teeth. 
After the war, probably several years, he returned 
to Broad Cove, and lived there unmolested, but, 
of course, thoroughly despised by the community.' 

Nov. 30, 1782, provisional articles of peace 
were agreed upon with Great Britain, by which 
that power acknowledged the independence of the 
colonies, but the definite treaty was not signed 
till Sept. 3, 1783. 

It is impossible to ascertain how many sol- 
diers Waldoboro furnished for the Revolutionary 
army. It is said, but it is not believed, that the 
Dutch Neck alone furnished not less than sixty 
men. We are unable to learn that any were killed 

I. Johnston's History of Bristol. 



WALDOBORO DURING REVOLUTION. !Jl 

or died in the service, though there must have 
been some for Maine lost more than one thousand 
men. 

The following list of revolutionary soldiers 
from Waldoboro, is from the rolls in the Adju- 
tant General's office in Boston: 

Captain Jacob Ludwig's company, raised for 
the investment of Castine, served from Oct. 6, to 
Dec. 2, 1777, 

Jacob Ludwig, Captain, 

William Farnsworth, ist Lieutenant, 

Jacob Winchenbach, 2d Lieutenant, 

Jonathan Nevers, Ensign, 

Caleb Howard, Sergeant, 

Godfrey Bornheimer, Sergeant, 

Peter Hilt, Corporal, 

Andrew Knowlton, Corporal, 

William Miller, Private, 

Godfry Hoffses, " 

Henry Overlock, " 

John Werner, " 

John Winchenbach, " 

Henry Farlin, " 

Andrew Malcom, " 

Isaac Sargus, " 

Michael Andrew, " 

Francis Young, " 

Ebenezer Jimmison, " 

Charles Jimmison, " 



^2 HISTORY OF IVALDOBORO. 

Ebenezer Davis, Private, 

John Hoffman, 

John Braizer, " 

Loring Gushing, " 

Joshua Smith, " 

It will be seen by these names that part of 
them were from neighboring towns, probably 
Warren and Friendship, The following served in 
different regiments : 

Christopher Walck, private in Capt. Philip 
M. Ulmer's company, Col. Samuel McCobb's 
regiment, from July 8, 1778, to Sept. 24, 1779, 

Daniel Beckler, ist Mass. Regiment, 3 years. 

John Benner, private, Capt. Philip M. Ulmer's 
company. Col. McCobb's regiment, 2 years, 6 
months. 

Michael Castner, private, Capt. Adam 
Wheeler's company. Col. Thomas Nixon's regi- 
ment. 

Joseph Gross, Reuben Gross and Chas Hebner 
served in Col. Joseph Vose's regiment, 3 years. 

Matthew Hebner, Col. McCobb's regiment. 

Christian Hoffses, regiment not given. 

George Hoffses, " " " 

John Newbert, (or Newbit) regiment not 
given. 

Christopher Newbert, Capt. Ulmer's com- 
pany, McCobb's regiment, lost arm at Major- 
bagaduce, July 28, 1779. 



WALDOBORO DURING REVOLUTION. 93; 

Ezra Pitcher, regiment not given. 

Georofe Ulmer, " " " 

George Ulmer, Jr., " " " 

Henry Storer, private, Capt. Abraham Hunt's 
company. Col. Joseph Vose's regiment, from May 
17, 1777, to May 18, 1780, was at Valley Forge. 

Philip Martin Ulmer, Captain and Major in 
Col. Samuel McCobb's regiment. 

Ezekiel Winslow. 

Adam Shuman deserted May 8, 1776. 

Isaiah Cole, regiment not given, was one of 
Washington's body guards. 

Frederick Schwartz. 

Soon after the Revolution Dr. Benjamin 
Brown, who had been a surgeon in the navy of 
the colonies, came to Bristol and later to VValdo- 
boro, where he finally permanently resided. 

Soon after the Revolution the property of the 
Royalists, or tories, was confiscated. In Volume 
3 of the Lincoln Probate records, we find the 
names of Jacob Young, John Smouse and George. 
Cline recorded as "absentees." 



CHAPTER XIII. 

PERIOD FROM THE REVOLUTION TO I 8oO. FIRST CENSUS 

As the immediate result of the Revolutionary 
war, the independence of the Colonies had been 
achieved, but the return of peace found the country 
in an impoverished condition, with a constantly 
depreciating paper currency, and the people 
burdened with debt. It was many years before 
Waldoboro was freed from all the obligations in- 
curred during the war. In the meantime, internal 
improvements were in progress. Roads were be- 
ing built, the town lines were renewed, a court 
house was built, and the Medomak bridged for the 
first time. 

The court of Common Pleas was held at 
Waldoboro from 1786 to 1799 when it was re- 
moved to Warren. The first court house was 
built on Kinsell's hill in 1786, by Capt. Cornelius 
Turner. It was 30 feet square with 10 feet posts. 
The court was held in this building in September 
of that year for the first time. A whipping post 
was erected, and Mr. Frederick Castner rembered 
seeing an Irishman whipped there for theft. He 
was tried, convicted and the sentence immediately 
carried out; a method of proceeding which has 



REVOLUTION TO 1800. FIRST CENSUS. 05 

not been improved by modern courts. According 
to the best information we can obtain, Court was 
held at Kinsell's until about 1796, when another 
court house was erected near Head's store. This 
building was afterwards remodeled into the present 
town house. 

May 9, 1 785, the town voted to build a bridge 
across the Medomak at "Lower Falls." John 
Ulmer, who owned all the land on the eastern side 
in the vicinity of the falls, appeared in town meet- 
ing and promised to give a way across his premi- 
ses for a road two rods in width, to the bridge. 
This offer was promptly accepted. Cornelius 
Turner, who seemed to hold himself in readiness 
for any kind of a job, bid off the building of this 
bridge for ^72 los. He was obliged by a vote 
of the town to receive any good man and pay him 
two shillings for a day's work on the bridge. 
Col. Farnsworth, George Damuth and Capt. 
David Vinal were appointed a committee "to view 
the bridge and see same is well made." Feb. 20, 
1786, the town voted to accept the bridge "as it 
now is made." 

At this time the church and town affairs were 
intimately connected. Committees for hiring the 
ministers were appointed at the annual town 
meetings and money appropriated for their sala- 
ries. After the departure of Rev. Mr. Theobald, 
the German pulpit was not occupied for the space 



96 HISTORY OF IVALDOBORO. 

of a year. In August 1785, the town agreed with 
Rev. Frederick Gruhner (commonly pronounced 
Kroner) "to preach the Gospel for twenty-eight 
shillings per Sabbath for twelve months." Gruh- 
ner was a faithful follower of his predecessor Dr. 
Schaeffer. He spent his time in drinking and 
card playing at the tavern, and horse racing was 
one of his favorite amusements. Even crimes of 
a much graver nature were laid to his charge. 
During his short ministry- of four years it was 
necessary to call him to account continually, and 
in April, 1788, a committee of five were chosen to 
draw up articles "that the Rev. Mr. Gruhner is 
to go by and behave himself accordingly." It is 
a little queer that Dr. Schaeffer was a member of 
this committee. Foreseeing that his career would 
end in his dismissal from the church, he preached 
his last sermon, which was in German and so 
nicely balanced that his audience did not compre- 
hend his object. His text, which was from John, 
7th chapter, 34th verse, was as follows: Irh 
werdet mich suchen, urid nicht Jinde?i ujid da icJi 
bin, Konnet ihr nicht hinkoTnmeny His depart- 
ure was made early the next morning. Neither 
his church nor his wife were ever after advised of 
his whereabouts or pursuits. 

The Rev, Thurston Whiting, who was located 
at Warren, must have preached here occasionally 
to the English, for the town voted May the 5th, 



REVOLUTION TO iSoo. FIRST CENSUS. 97 

1787, to allow him 24 shillings per Sabbath as long 
as he should be employed. 

During the year 1789, roads were built to 
Nobleboro and to Warren. 

The first census of the United States (1790) 
comprised an enumeration of the inhabitants of 
the present states of Connecticut, Delaware, 
Georgia, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachu- 
setts, New Hampshire, New York, New Jersey, 
North Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, and Virgin- 
ia. A portion of the schedules of this Census was 
destroyed when the British burned the Capitol at 
Washington during the War of 18 12. Fortunate- 
ly the enumeration for Maine did not share the 
fate of some of the others. This first Census 
which represents the United States at the adoption 
of the Constitution, showed the total population 
of the country' to be 3,23 1 ,533. The enumeration 
of the towns of Bristol, Nobleboro and Waldoboro, 
was made by one John Polerezcky, whose name 
seems to indicate that he was either a Russian, or 
a Pole. The list of heads of families according to 
his enumeration, is so incorrectly spelled that in 
many cases it is difficult to determine what name 
was meant. The heads of families in Waldoboro 
in 1790, according to Polerezcky's report, are 
griven without correction : — 

o 

hines, Conelis burghart, John 

heabner, george welch, Charles 



ikS liJSTOI^r O/^ IIALDOSOJ^O. 



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ad. lurmais 



REVOLUTION TO lioo. FIRST CENSUS. 99 



orf, Stophel 
Sidenspire (widow) 
Sidenspire, charles 
keller, Jacob, Jun 
Rernly, mathias 
lear, peter 
hossies, christian 
mink, philip 
keizer, francis 
Stall, philip 
miller, henrj' 
walk, henry 
kalor, charles 
farnswort, william, Jun 
farnswort, william 
fam-S'.vort, Robert 
farnswort, Isaac 
morgin, James 
pitcher (widow) 
ho ward, Joshua 
burghart, henr)' 
ewell, henry 
houpe, Joseph 
heat, John 
Studley, John 
wihal, francis 
Jones, luke 
hevener, mathias 
cumerer, Joseph 
hossies, god fried 
Mink, valantin 
Payson, John 
Warner, george 
oldham, peleg 



loring, judah 
pitcher, nathl 
brow, Joseph 
turner, alexander 
drawbridge, John 
From Port Royal 
Simons (widow) 
haupt, John 
heisler, martin 
feiler, jaspar 
fitchgearald, John 
Sider, comelius 
Cramer, John 
Sidlinger, martin 
Sidlinger, charles 
Sidlinger, daniel 
kintzel, John 
Sprague, nathan 
Sprague, michel 
Rota (widow) 
waiter, peter 
hunt, John 
fielhauer, daniel 
bradex, John 
Simons, Stephen 
Mcgayer, thomas 
Cramer, Jacob 
cramer, charles 
Cramer, fridrich 
turner, comelius 
leicht, george 
leicht, peter 
kohn, paul 
winal, david 



:i3D 



-B7STDIS}' 137 W^JJDDBURD. 



ieicirt (widoBr) 

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iftemiei, maxtm 

fmai7n-e;. wfllaaTr 

EiriiorD, Ijoim 

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laTtfrrm. geoige 

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iniPiinaaii. Charfes 

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Sctwianz. tadench 
jismui. -ppfTrgf^ 
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iisn. paul 
isisner. ^soijOf 
rnapmar; f widow; 

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x:u3i£;. laijjsii 
Coie. 3^a'± 

Bash, Cmircij 
-aadiss, Stfatqansu 
Siiies. ixrring 
nsw^ben. Stopnal 
aewijen. Jaim 
iioT. Jorm 
tiujinas. JoshuE 

neavsner. jrharks 
J^unii., corrteims; 

■tvmcxiaKavi . rtsim- 

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'nna.. ezeciuai 

bamue; 

-;1]. Lewis 

r---- - ...^aiD 
iiisisz Toot. 



REVOLUTION TO 1800. FIRST CENSUS. 101 

Sidenspire, John Samson, charles, Jun 

andrew, michel Simons, Eckiel (Hungh Is- 
mink, pacel land) 

Simons, Zebede Simons, Joab (Hungh Island) 

Simons, Joseph Simons, Isaac (Hungh Island) 

lasse, John Sidenspire, george 

Shenck, Andrew thomas, waterman 

kesler, John payson, Samuel 

Shanemar, christian Sole (widow) 

Shenk (widow) Sole, Josephus 

Starow, mathias morphi (widow) 

Starow, andrew hofses, george 

Samson, charles maning, Edward 
winchapaw, John 

The population (1790) was 1206. 

Samuel Sumner Wilde, Esq., who had prac- 
ticed law here a short time, removed to Warren 
in 1794 

Rev. John Martin Shaeffer died in Warren, 
April 20, 1794. 

During the winter of 1794-95 the meeting 
house, which had stood on the eastern side of ihe 
Medomak, was moved across the river on the ice 
and erected on the western side. Rev. Mr, Ritz 
was installed as pastor in i 794. 

In the spring of 1791 the dams on the river 
were carried away by a freshet, and the bridge 
was either carried away or so much damaged as 
to be impassable. 

Persevering efforts were made to have the 
plantation of Medumcook, now Friendship, an- 



102 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

nexed to this town. The proposition for annex- 
ation was regularly brought up in town meeting 
for several years, and as regularly voted down. 
Whether this desire for annexation was on the 
part of some of our own people, or the residents 
of Medumcook, we are unable to say. 

At this time it was the pactice to warn all 
new comers out of town, to prevent their gaining 
a residence and claiming assistance from the town 
in case of poverty. Every fresh arrival, rich or 
poor, met with this inhospitable reception. In the 
town record we find many copies of these warn- 
ings. This custom was not peculiar to Waldo- 
boro, but was in vogue in all the towns at that 
period. 

In 1792 the town was for the first time visited 
by that direful disease, the small pox. A town 
meeting was called and measures adopted to pre- 
vent the disease spreading. A committee was 
chosen to procure a suitable hospital, and another 
committee to prosecute any person found spread- 
ing the small pox by inoculation. In 1800 the 
small pox made its appearance in Waldoboro and 
Warren. A special meeting was called in March, 
and a unanimous vote passed that no inoculation 
would be allowed. But in June permission was 
given Dr. Benjamin Brown to erect a hospital on 
Isaiah Cole's hill, for the purpose of inoculating 
persons with the small pox. Dr. Brown was re- 



REVOLUTION TO 1800. FIRST CENSUS. lo:3 

quired to give a bond of $2,000 for the faithful 
performance of his duty; and it was stipulated 
that no part of the expense should be borne by 
the town. 

At this time (1795) there were seven saw 
mills and three grist mills in town. 

A custom house was establised at Waldoboro 
by act of Congress approved March 31, 1789, and 
Waterman Thomas, Esq., appointed "Inspector of 
Revenue." His commission, dated June 13. 1795, 
and bearing the signature Washington, is in the 
possession of Miss Elizabeth F. Genthner of this 
place. 

Previous to 1795 no regular mails had pene- 
trated further east than Wiscasset, but his year, on 
petition of the inhabitants of the towns interested, 
postmasters were appointed and the Waldoboro 
Post Office was included in the number established. 
The mail was sent once a week on horseback. 
The post-office was located on the western side of 
the river, near the present town house, which was 
then the business part of the place. The first 
postmaster was John Head. During the war of 
1812, the mails were detained here and a room- 
full accumulated. The exposed condition of this 
quantity of mail offered inducements for robbery 
which were not overlooked. During the night 
the building was broken into and a large amount 
stolen. 



104 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

At the close of the century the nucleus of 
the village was formincr at the head of the tide, 
the principal business part being on the western 
side. The German language continued to be 
spoken. Eaton says agriculture had made some 
advances. Farmers were supplied with more and 
better implements, particularly plows and carts. 
Horse wagons were unknown and ox wagons were 
but just coming into use. The usual conveyance 
for persons and light burdens, was on horseback. 
Men and boys rode to mill with two or three bags 
beneath them. Kegs of molasses and rum were 
carried home in the same way. The practice of 
"ridinof double," as it was called, was universal. 
Whether to church or to the ball, the man rode 
before on the saddle, the lady on the pillion be- 
hind him. But this mode of conveyance was be- 
ginning to yield, during the winter months, to 
sleighs which, both double and single, were now 
becoming common. But there were, as yet, no 
robes of buffalo or other furs, for the protection 
of man or beast, though the feet were sometimes 
relieved by portable foot stoves, both on journeys 
and at church. Tea and coffee were in general 
use. Ardent spirits, which were formerly used 
only on extraordinary occasions, were becoming 
more dangerously common. Hospitality still 
abounded; and no occasion was lost for getting up 
a frolic. The women had their spinning bees and 



REVOLUTION TO 1800. FIRST CENSUS. 105 

wool-breakings; the men, their huskings and 
wood-hauHngs. When a building was raised, a 
vessel launched, or the militia mustered, every- 
body attended and everybody was treated. 



CHAPTER XIV. 

PERIOD FROM 1 8oO TO 1S2O. 

The second U. S. Census, taken in 1800, 
showed an increase in the population of the town 
to 15 16. 

At this time the village, if it could be called 
by that name, still presented the appearance of a 
new settlement. Business was about equally 
divided between the eastern and western sides of 
the river. On the eastern bank, which afterwards 
became the business portion of the place, the 
land had been cleared, the Barnard Tavern had 
been built, the old Sproul house stood in the 
north corner now occupied by the Sproul block, 
and the next building south was Thompson's 
house standing near where the residence of the 
late John H. Kennedy now is. Thompson's store 
was on the opposite side of the street. From 
these buildings the dwellings of Major Razor, Mr. 
Kuhn, George Vannah' (who afterwards moved to 
Nobleboro), Mr. Schwartz (who died in the Rev- 
olutionary army), Mr. Demuth and Mr. Lash 
formed a row along the hill some distance from 
the road. Between the road and the river there 

I. This house was burne'l in the great fire of 1854. 



PERIOD FROM iSoo TO 1820. 107 

were no buildings except Thompson's Store, where 
Mrs. Liiella VVinchenbach now resides and Doctor 
Walleazer's house which was where Governor 
Marble formerly resided. During this period 
Henry Flagg, who was the efficient town clerk 
several years, built what was afterwards known as 
the Brown place, on the corner where E. R. Ben- 
ner's drug store now stands, and the Groton house 
had been built on the opposite corner. On the 
western side of the river, was the court house, 
Head's store and Smouse's store opposite, and 
Smouse's house in the field. Smouse afterwards 
traded in a store on his wharf. At Kaler's corner 
Joshua Head was engaged in erecting the large 
dwelling now owned by G. VV. Clouse. Soon 
after this Mrs. Trowbridge, familiarly known as 
"Aunt Lydia," opened a tavern on the Warren 
road near Waltz's Corner. 

During the period from 1800 to the "separa- 
tion," many new citizens were attracted hither. 
Among these may be mentioned Isaac G. Reed, 
and Gorham Parks, lawyers, Samuel Morse,' Isaac 
Hibbard, a hatter, Denny McCobb, Joseph Farley, 
Alfred and James Hovey, John Currier, Ezekiel 
Barnard, William Sproul, Payn Elwell, Thomas 
Willett, William Fish, Dr. John Manning, Avery 

I. Samuel Morse taught school several years; afterwards operated 
a tannerv. 



lOS HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

and Horace Rawson, 'Charles Bruce, Henry Flagg, 
Robert Chase, John Brown, a saddler, and John 
Ayers. Dr. John Haupt, an educated German 
•physician, who came here from Germany previous 
to 1790, and married Mary Waterman, went to 
Wlscasset where he died in the early part ot this 
century. Some of these people lived and died 
here ; others have removed and been forgotten. 

Gen. Denny McCobb came to Waldoboro 
from Bath and was Collector of Customs here 
a number of years. He lived near the school- 
house where Levitt Storer's house now stands. 
His daughter, Huldah Marie, married Gen. John 
T. Castner. 

In 1803 the town purchased the old court 
house and repaired it for a town house. The 
amount paid for land and building was $230. It 
still does service as a place for holding town 
meetings. 

In 1806 the town built a bridge at the outlet 
of Medomak pond. William Sproul built the 
bridge for $200. 

Oct. 25, 1806. Gen. Henry Knox, who, after 
the Revolution, took up his residence in Thomas- 
ton, died at his palatial home in that town. His 

I. Avery Rawson built the house on Cole's hill which he sold to 
William Cole and then built the house now occupied by Mrs. Dora York. 
Horace Rawson (father of M. M. Rawson), built the house now occupied 
by his son and granddaughter. 



PERIOD FROM 1800 TO 1820. 109* 

death was caused by his swallowing one of the 
minute sharp bones of a chicken, which, lodging 
in the aesophagus, or stomach, produced an inflam- 
mation which could not be controlled/ Many of 
the land deeds in Waldoboro bear the sigrnature of 
Henry Knox. 

So many of the citizens now used only the 
English language, that complaint was made against 
having the Gospel preached exclusively in Ger- 
man, and May 10, 1806, a committee appointed 
by the town, reported that "It is expedient and 
will in our opinion be conducive to union and 
harmony, if the sum of money to be raised for 
the support of the Gospel, shall be assessed on 
the polls and estates of all the inhabitants of the 
town, without making any distinction between, 
the German Society and the inhabitants of the 
town ; that the German Society ought to drav/ 
from the treasury of said town $208 for the minis- 
ter; that the sum exactly equal to that which the 
German Society draws, ought to be drawn for the 
hire of an English minister. The report was ac- 
cepted and this arrangement continued for several 
years, the amount raised varying from $500 to 
$1,000. 

In 1807 the town voted to give to Rev. John 
Ruggles Cutting an invitation to settle therein 
and perform the duties of minister of the Gospel.. 

I. Eaton's history of Thomaston. 



110 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Joseph Farley, John Head, George Demuth, 
Thomas W. Sproul, Thomas Waterman and 
Joshua Head were appointed a committee to 
engage Mr. Cutting. At a subsequent meeting 
the committee reported his acceptance. In iSo8 
the Congregational church was organized and 
Rev. John R. Cutting installed pastor, the first 
English preacher in town. The installation ser- 
vices took place in Smouse's field, upon a staging 
erected where the Augustus Welt and Nathan 
Nash houses now are. The church edifice was 
not built till 1820, and dedicated in September of 
that year. 

In 1807, for the first time the question of 
the separation of Maine from Massachusetts, came 
before the town. The vote was none in favor, 
205 opposed. The town voted several times on 
this proposition, always in opposition. Nov. 14, 
1 8 16, voted to send a remonstrance against sepa- 
ration. 

The census taken in 18 10 showed a further 
increase of population to 2160. 

Previous to 18 10 only two militia companies 
were enrolled in W^aldoboro, but this year the 
"Waldoboro Light Infantry" was organized, uni- 
formed and equipped. The company was made 
up as follows: 

OFFICERS : 

Isaac G. Reed, Captain, 



PERIOD FROM 1800 TO i?>20. Ill 

Charles Miller, Lieutenant, 
Jacob Ludwig, Ensign, 
Alden Thomas, Clerk, 
Thomas Simmons, Corporal, 
Samuel Morse, " 

John Brown, " 

MUSICIANS : 

Christian Walter. Fifer, 
Charles Shuman, " 
Gardiner Davis, Bass Drum, 
Charles Demuth, Tenor Drum, 
Joseph Groton, " " 

PRIVATES : 

John Achorn, John Head, 2d, 

George Achorn, Phillip Hilt, 

John Alstine, John Kinsell, 

John Bartlett, John Kuhn, 

Jacob Burkett, Jacob Kaler, 

Charles Burkett, Charles Kaler, 2d, 

Frederick Benner, Paul Kaler, 

Charles Benner, George, Kaler, 

Charles Benner, 2d, John Kidder, 

Jacob Benner, John Lash, 

Christopher Benner, Jacob Lash, 

Ralph Cole, George Miller, 

John Demuth, Frank Miller, 

Martin Demuth, Henry Manning, 

Phillip Demuth, John Sides, 



112 HISTORY OF IVALDOBQRO. 

William Fish, Andrew Schenck, 

Phillip Feyler, Charles Seiders, 

John Freeman, Henry Seiders, 

Thomas Gillard, Adam Shuman, 

Asa Hunt, Phillip Shuman, 

John Hahn, Daniel Sampson, 

George Hibbard, John Trowbridge, 

James Trowbridge. 
Rev. Mr. Ritz died in iSii, and the town 
voted to defray the expense of his funeral. After 
the death of Mr. Ritz a meeting of the German 
Society was held and Capt Charles Miller was 
delegated with full power to go to Philadelphia 
and engage a minister able to preach in the Ger- 
man language, and a man suited to the wants of 
the Society. Capt. Miller performed this duty 
and engaged Rev. John William Starman, who ar- 
rived in Waldoboro and preached his first sermon 
in the German meeting house in the fall of i8i i. 
It appears that he had not been ordained, for Nov, 
25, 181 1, a committee reported to the Society in 
favor of paying Mr. Starman $400 a year, "if he 
will return to us again as an ordained minister in 
the same manner and form as Mr. Ritz." Mr. 
Starman complied with this request and began 
his pastorate in 181 2. 

The embargo and non-intercourse act, pro- 
hibiting commerce with England and France, be- 
came so embarassing that, Sept. 5, 1808, the 



PERIOD FROM iSoo TO 1820. 113 

town voted to petition the President of the United 
States to have the embargo removed. 

In the war of 18 12 the people of Waldoboro 
took no active part until near its close, with the 
exception of precautionary measures for general 
protection. June 13, 18 14, a committee appointed 
by the town, reported in favor of having a com- 
mittee appointed to consult with committees of 
Bristol, Friendship and other towns in the vicinity, 
and with officers of the militia, for some uniform 
mode of conveying alarm on approach of danger, 
and that the selectmen be requested to immedi- 
ately cause 50 lbs. of powder to be made into car- 
tridges with a ball in each cartridge, and the 
officers of the militia in case of alarm be autho- 
rized to distribute the ammunition to the soldiers 
under their command. The report was accepted 
and Dr. Benjamin Brown, Joshua Head, John 
Stahl and Payne Elwell were appointed a com- 
mittee of safety. 

The boom of guns in the sea fight between 
the Enterprise and Boxer, which occurred Sept. 
5, 1 8 13, was distinctly heard in town. This 
action took place between Pemaquid Point and 
Monhegan. 

The enemy's cruisers made navigation along 
the coast very dangerous. On the sixth day of 
June, 1 8 14, the sloop Mary, which sailed from 
this port, was captured by a barge containing 



114 HISTORY OF VVALDOBORO. 

twenty men from the British frigate Junon. The 
sloop was burned and the captain and crew taken 
to Halifax and confined in Melville Island Prison. 
The names of those captured were Capt. Jacob 
Kaler, Charles W. Caler, Henry Caler and James 
Benner. After remaining at Melville Island six 
weeks, they were put on board the "Chespeake" 
(captured from the United States) and carried to 
Plymouth, England, whence they were marched 
to Dartmoor prison. There they found Benjamin 
Brown and Benjamin Kinsell, old acquaintances 
from Waldoboro. Kinsell had been impressed 
into the English service, and, refusing to fight 
against his countrymen, was treated as a prisoner 
of war. Brown had been captured on an Ameri- 
can privateer. These men were all present April 
9, 1 815, when the massacre of prisoners occurred. 
While confined there James Benner took. a severe 
cold from bathing and was carried to the hospital 
where to all appearance he died. Preparations 
were made to bury him, but after lying in syncope 
twenty-four hours, he revived and at the expira- 
tion of three days of mental derangement, he was 
pronounced out of danger. He died in this town 
Sept. 3, 1873, at the age of 81 years. When 
peace was declared these prisoners were sent to 
New York, thence to Boston where they took pas- 
sage with Capt. Charles Sampson for Waldoboro.' 

I. Captain Charles W. Caler, deceased. 



PERIOD FROM 1800 TO 1820. 115 

The most exciting time of the war was caused 
by the appearance of a British fleet at Camden. 
On Saturday afternoon, Sept. 3, 1814, a courier 
reached Major Isaac G. Reed with orders to have 
his battalion under arms at sunrise the next 
morning, with three days' rations, prepared to 
march to the defense of Camden Harbor. At 
this time the militia of Waldoboro was composed 
of two companies not uniformed, with the excep- 
tion of the officers, and the Light Infantry in uni- 
form. The companies were commanded by Capt. 
Phillip Keizer, Capt. George Clouse and Capt. 
Charles Miller of the Light Infantry. These 
companies made up a battalion under Major Reed 
and were a part of Colonel Thatcher's regiment. 
Sunday morning these troops were in line in front 
of the town house and roll call showed only eight 
absentees. Some of these joined their companies 
before they reached Camden. After an inspection 
and prayer by one of the clergymen, the battalion, 
with the Light Infantry on the right, took up its 
line of march for the "front," followed a long dis- 
tance by weeping mothers, wives and sweethearts. 
Sunday night the battalion remained at Warren, 
and not being provided with tents, found shelter 
in barns and other buildings. Monday morning 
Major Reed's command was ordered to what is 
now Rockland, where shelter for the night was 
provided by Jacob Ulmer. Alfred Hovey, Quar- 



116 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

termaster, was ordered to report to Major Reed as 
Acting Adjutant. Tuesday the battalion marched 
to Camden where it was joined by the other bat- 
taHon of Thatcher's regiment, under Major Hawes 
of Union. Col. E. Foote's regiment was also on 
the ground and this display of force deterred the 
enemy from landing. The two regiments were 
paraded in review before Major General King of 
Bath, and were ordered home after a campaign of 
a week in which they did not have an opportunity 
to fire a gun. The battalion arrived here Satur- 
day and were quartered at Major Reed's house' 
till Monday when a review took place in Smouse's 
field, and they were dismissed. 

The year 1816 w^as the coldest on record. 
Frost occurred with more or less severity every 
month. On the 12th of April there was a storm 
of snow which laid for a week and made good 
sleighing. May v/as cold and on the 24th rain 
was congealed on the fruit trees then ready to 
blossom. On the 5th, or 6th, of June wintry 
weather set in with squalls of wind, snow and hail, 
from the northwest, which destroyed birds, froze 
the ground, cut down vegetation and compelled 
people to put on their great coats and mittens. 

I. This house was begun by Rev. John R. Cutting and was then in 
an unfinished condition. It was completed by Major Reed, its owner, who 
occupied it. 



PERIOD FROM 1800 TO 1820. 117 

The whole month was cold and heavy frosts oc- 
curred in July/ 

April 1 2th, 18 1 7, the town adopted a resolu- 
tion to the effect that "the vice of intoxication 
hath, in the town of Waldoboro, attained to an 
extent ruinous to the morals, destructive to the 
health and injurious to those addicted to it." The 
selectmen were instructed to use all legal means 
in their power to prevent the vending of rum and 
other spiritous liquors. 

In 18 1 7 the "new county road," so called, 
was built from Joshua Head's house to James 
Hall's mill in Nobleboro, at a cost of $1,422.00. 
The road was built under the supervision of Isaac 
G. Reed, Payne Elwell and Samuel Morse. 
About this time the river was bridged at what is 
now Soule's mill. 

In 18 19 the question of separation having 
been decided by a majority of the voters of the 
district, delegates were chosen to a convention in 
Portland, to frame a State Constitution. The del- 
egates from this town were Joshua Head, Isaac G. 
Reed and Jacob Ludwig, Jr. On the 6th of 
December the town voted 33 in favor of accepting 
the Constitution and 2 opposed. 

At the same time the selectmen were author- 
ized to contract for and secure conveyance ot a 
suitable place whereon to set a powder house and 

I. Annals of Warren. 



118 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

to cause to be built thereon a brick buildine. in 
which to deposite the town's stock of ammunition. 
This powder house was subsequently built on 
Frock's Ledge where it was a prominent object 
till 1885 when it was torn down by the selectmen 
and the brick used for building a chimney in 
the engine house which was built that year. 

The business of shipbuilding was a growing 
industry, although confined to a small class of 
vessels. 

The German language continued to be used 
by a majority of the people in every day conversa- 
tion. When using English their speech was de- 
cidedly "Dutchy." 



CHAPTER XV. 

PERIOD FROM 182O TO 184O. 

The census of 1820 made the pc^pulation of 
Waldoboro 2449. The increase was due to the 
business prosperity and importance of the town. 
A flourishing village was rapidly being built up 
on the eastern side of the river whither trade had 
gradually removed. Shipbuilding and trade were 
drawing many citizens hither and every branch of 
industry was prospering. During the early part 
of this period came Joseph Clark, Robert C. 
Webb/ John Bulfinch and others. Henry Ken- 
nedy removed from the northern part of the town 
and began business in the village as a trader and 
later as a shipbuilder. 

Maine had become a State with nine counties 
and two hundred and thirty-six towns. We are 
informed that the design for the State seal was 
conceived by Col. Isaac G. Reed, who was a 
member of the Constitutional Convention, and the 
design sketched by Miss Bertha Smouse,^ his step- 
daughter. From her sketch was engraved the 

1. Robert C. Webb came from New Castle in 1S22 and taught school 
several terms in the Charles Crammer district. Later he operated a tan- 
nery and manufactured shoes. 

2. Bertha Smouse married Dr. John G. Brown. 



120 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

seal which has been in use since Maine became a 
State. 

Previous to 1821 the post office had been lo- 
cated on the west side. John Head, who had 
been postmaster twenty-six years, being ready to 
relinquish the office, it was confidently hoped that 
it might be removed to the east side for the con- 
venience of a majority of the citizens, who desired 
the appointment of Payne Elwell. To the sur- 
prise of everybody Charles Samson, who resided 
and conducted a store at Thomas's Hill three 
miles south, received the appointment. A town 
meeting was called Jan. 8, 1821, at which it was 
voted "that the town petition the Postmaster 
General to remove Charles Samson from the 
office of Postmaster of this town." The remon- 
strance goes on to represent that Mr. Elwell, who 
resided in the centre of the village, had a very 
convenient place for the office to be kept, and 
was well qualified for the position, that Charles 
Samson resided three miles from any part of the 
post road, and was withal extremely obnoxious 
and displeasing to the great mass of the people. 
Notwithstanding Mr. Samson held the office eight 
years, when he was succeeded by Col. Isaac G. 
Reed, who removed the office to the village in 
1828. 

The same year Samuel Sweetland and others 
petitioned the legislature for a division of the 



PERIOD FROM 1820 TO 1S40. 121 

town. A special town meeting was called and it 
was voted to remonstrate against such division 
and to authorize the selectmen to take such 
measures as they may think expedient, at the ex- 
pense of the town, to oppose the petition. The 
town was not divided. 

May 5, 1823, the town voted to pay Rev. 
Mr. Mitchell and Rev. Mr. Starman their salaries 
to the end of the year, and "that all contracts ex- 
isting- between them and the town be null and 
void from and after the 21st day of October next; 
and providing said Messrs. Mitchell and Starman 
shall within twenty days signify in writing to the 
town clerk their consent to annul their contract 
with the town." May 19th Rev. Mr. Mitchell 
signified his consent; May 20th Rev. J. W. Star- 
man stated: "I feel extremely hurt by the words 
in which the town vote is expressed. I never 
did, nor do I consider myself a minister of the 
town of VValdoboro ; that my call as minister of the 
Gospel to this place, came solely from the Ger- 
man Protestant Society and Church, and there- 
fore there are no labors to cease, nor any con- 
tract to be annulled between the town and me; 
that in conformity to a contract which exists be- 
tween said society and the town I will call upon 
the town within six months for the balance due 
me by said society; that I willingly submit that 
even this connection between the town and me 



122 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

be dissolved as soon as the town pleases." Thus 
ended the employment of ministers by the town. 

Sept. 13th, 1824, the town voted to lay out a 
"bridle road" from meeting house cove, by John 
P. Gross's to Jacob Heavner's, agreeably to the 
petition of John P. Gross and others ; other bridle 
roads were subsequently laid out. The same 
year a bridge was built where the old boom 
spanned the river near Bulfinch's. This bridge 
was a private enterprise, which was accepted by 
the town some years later. 

The Plrst Baptist Church was organized June 
6, 1824, with eleven members. Rev. Job Wash- 
burn was the first pastor. 

In 1825, it appears a movement was made to 
set off a portion of the town to the town of Union, 
for the Selectmen were instructed to write to the 
representative of the town in the legislature to 
oppose any such legislation. Again in 1830 an 
effort was made by the town of Bremen to annex 
to that town Johnston's Island, and our represent- 
ative was instructed to oppose such annexation. 

Census of 1830 was 31 13. 

Wild animals were still troublesome and as 
late as 1830 the town offered a premium of five 
dollars for every wild cat killed in town. 

Commodore Samuel Tucker, who had been 
a frequent visitor, died at his home in Bremen, 
March 10, 1833. 



PERIOD FROM 1820 TO iSoo. 12:3 

A weekly newspaper called the Lincoln 
Patriot was published here several years by G. W. 
and F. W. Nichols. It was a folio sheet, 21x31 
inches, very nicely printed on clear rag paper, and 
was furnished to subscribers at two dollars per 
annum. Its files show that its columns were well 
filled with advertisements of the business of Wal- 
doboro, Thomaston, Warren, Nobleboro, New- 
castle and Wiscasset. Long political articles were 
the principal feature, and the local news coJumn, 
so prominent in modern newspapers, was con- 
spicuous by its absence. The Patriot was pub- 
lished in the interest of the Democracy, and tra- 
dition states that the Federalists, the opposition 
party, gave it the derisive name of Lincoln Poker. 
The first number was issued Dec. 5, 1834. 

About 1835 George Sproul moved the old 
Sproul dwelling back from the corner and erected 
a brick building extending part way to Pleasant 
street. South of the block near the corner was a 
well with an old fashioned wooden pump. This 
well is now under Charles Keene's store. 

The Waldoboro Lyceum met in Sproul's hall. 
James Hovey was secretary. One of the subjects 
for discussion was "Has every man his price?" 
Another was: "Was it right for the powers of 
Europe to confine Napoleon Bonaparte on the 
Island of St. Helena?" 

E. Bartlett French opened a law office in 



124 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Sproul's new block, a name which our readers will 
recognize as Ezra B. French. About the same 
time Dr. Elijah A. Daggett offered his services as 
a physician and surgeon. Turner & Harvey be- 
gan the business of sailmaking on Smouse's wharf. 

During this period the following packets 
were plying between this port and Boston : 
Schooner Example, Capt. Haupt, schooner Hero, 
Capt. Wallace, schooner Atlantic, Capt. Kaler, 
schooner Othello, Capt. Cole, schooner Packet, 
Capt. Cudworth, schooner Bahama, Capt. Winch- 
enbach, schooner Medomak, Capt. Isaac Winchen- 
bach, schooner Bertha. Capt. Castner, schooner 
Watchman, Capt. Woltz, schooner Mary Jane, 
Capt. Woltz, schooner Columbia, Capt. Kaler, 
schooner Firm, Capt. Creamer. 

In 1836 the United States treasury having 
•surplus revenue, it was distributed to the several 
States, to be refunded when called for. The 
legislature of Maine accepted its share of the 
money and passed an act to distribute it among 
the several towns according to population, on 
condition that it should be returned, if called for, 
on sixty days notice. March 13, 1837, ^^e town 
voted to accept its proportion of the fund, "on 
the condition specified in the act," and Col. 
George Sproul was appointed agent to demand 
and receive the money and receipt therefor. It 
was also voted that the money so received, be 



PERIOD FROM 1820 TO 1840. 125 

deposited in the Medomak Bank. March 19, 
1838, the town voted to divide the "surpkis reve- 
nue" received from the State, pei^ capita, and 
George Sproul was appointed agent to pay it out. 
Subsequently the agent was instructed to pay to 
each person who was an inhabitant of the town, 
March i, 1837, "ten dollars and four cents," 
After this payment a balance of $1 15.01 remained 
which was paid into the town treasury. 

In 1838, Colonel Reed was succeeded as 
postmaster by George W. Nichols, Editor of the 
Patriot. 

In 1838, this community, as well as the whole 
country, was agitated by news of the death, in a 
duel at Bladensburg, Md., of Hon. Jonathan 
Cilley, member of Congress from this district. 
Public meetings were held in the leading towns 
of the State. In Waldoboro a meeting was held 
in Sproul's Hall, Saturday evening, March 3rd. 
Gen. Denny McCobb presided and Thomas D. 
Currier acted as Secretary. A committee on res- 
olutions composed of the following gentlemen was 
chosen : Hon. John Manning, George D. Smouse, 
Parker McCobb, Jr., George Sproul and Joseph 
Clark. The resolutions expressed the deepest in- 
dignation of the citizens of Waldoboro at the foul 
murder of their representative. 

The Universalists held services occasionally 



12U HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

when Rev. Mr. George and other clergymen 
officiated. 

Philip Seiders became landlord of the Bar- 
nard Tavern, which had been refitted as a suitable 
"stopping place" for the man of business or pleas- 
ure. 

An agent for fire engines came to Waldobo- 
ro previous to 1840, and interested the citizens, 
who decided to purchase a machine, and the funds 
were raised by subscription, Hector M. Brown and 
George D. Smouse being instrumental in raising 
the necessary funds. This machine was a rotary 
pump and was named the "Water Witch." It is 
still in existence. 

The troubles over the northeastern boundry 
of Maine, commonly called the "Aroostook War," 
caused much excitement all over the State in 
1839. The legislature passed a resolve for the 
protection of the public lands, and ordered a draft 
for ten thousand men from the militia for imme- 
diate action. The draft in Waldoboro was de- 
layed and the men were not called out. The town 
voted to make up the pay of soldiers to $20 a 
month, "Should they be marched;" also voted 
that should the drafted men be marched out of 
town the selectmen be authorized to convey them 
to the place of rendezvous in the best possible 
way. Although the drafted men from Waldoboro 
were not called out, Simon Shuman of this town 



PERIOD FROM 1820 TO 1840. 137 

served in Capt. Daniel Dority's company of 
infantry, in the detachment called into actual ser- 
vice, from Feb. 20, 1839 to April 23, 1839, when 
discharged.' 

I. Records in Augusta. 



^ 



CHAPTER XVI. 

FROM 1840 TO i860. 

The census of 1840 made the population of 
Waldoboro 3661. 

Jan. 1, 1840, Joseph Shuman, aged forty-four 
years, was crushed to death while felling trees in 
the woods. The next year Thomas Vannah, while 
bathing in the river near the village, was drowned. 

The sixty-fourth anniversary of American in- 
dependance was celebrated July 4, 1840, A pro- 
cession was formed at Hussey's Hotel at 10 
o'clock, A. M. under the direction of Col. John T. 
Castner, Marshal, assisted by Messrs. Solomon 
Prock, William F. Storer, F. W. Nichols, Charles 
S. Brown and Michael T. Simmons, and were es- 
corted by the independent companies to the Con- 
gregational meeting house, where an oration was 
delivered by Harvey C. Lowell, Esq. of East 
Thomaston. The declaration of independence 
was read by Col. George Sproul. After the ser- 
vices at the meeting house, the company returned 
to the hotel, where a dinner was served. The 
same day the ladies of the Congregational society 
held a successful fair. 

The following year July 4th was celebrated 



PERIOD FROM 1840 TO i860. 120 

by the Washingtonians. A parade through the 
streets, under the direction of Capt. Wilham S. 
Cochran, ended at the Baptist church, where the 
oration was delivered by Edward A. Reed, Esq. 
In the procession was carried a transparency, the 
execution of which was creditable to the ingenuity 
and taste of the gentleman who painted it — John 
Balch. 

Heretofore no serious calamity had occurred 
to check the prosperity of the village, but on the 
loth day of October, 1846, a fire broke out, which 
destroyed nearly the whole business portion as 
well as several residences. Two little children 
were the innocent cause of all this destruction of 
property. They were playing with matches in 
Andrew Sides' barn and communicated fire to a 
pile of shavings, which, fanned by a strong north 
wind soon enveloped T. D. Currier's and Andrew 
Sides' houses and barns in flames. In a few min- 
utes Sproul's barn was found to be in flames, the 
sparks having passed over Isaac Reed's house 
leaving it unharmed. From Sproul's barn the fire 
spread to the building in the corner next to Pleas- 
ant street and from thence took an opposite direc- 
tion, burning both sides of the street to Main 
street and down Main on the south side to Gor- 
ham Smouse's store. The fire was discovered 
about two o'clock P. M., and in two hours the 
district described was in ruins. The only engine 



^ 



130 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

and company here was powerless against such a 
wind, and a request was sent to Thomaston for 
aid. In response a company and engine were 
despatched and arrived here in the evening. 
During the night fire broke out in Dr. Ludwig's 
house, which stood where Willett's Block now is, 
and the house and barn together with Gay's store 
were completely destroyed. The latter fire was 
supposed to have been the work of an incendiary. 
It was a fearful night. Rum held supreme con- 
trol and the hours were spent by many in riot and 
fighting. A large number of the merchants were 
in Boston, buying their winter stocks. The fol- 
lowing traders were burned out: Joseph Clark, B. 
B. Haskell, Henry Kennedy, James Hovey, Alfred 
Hovey, Schwartz & Castner, John Sides, Genth- 
ner & Morse, John Balch, Thomas Gay, Edward 
Benner, A. T. Moses, J. A. & C. Levensaler, 
Henry Howard. The Custom House and Post- 
ofBce, the Medomak Bank, the offices of Dr. H. 
Bliss, Dr. Ludwig, Isaac G. Reed, John Bulfinch, 
and the tailor shops of Henry Herbert and Ham 
Bros, were also destroyed. Besides the families 
of Mr. Currier, Mr. Sides, and Dr. Ludwig, there 
were several families living over stores who were 
burned out. With characteristic energy the burn- 
ed district was immediately rebuilt in a more sub- 
stantial manner than before. 

Soon after the fire of 1846 the necessity of 



PERIOD FROM 1840 TO i860. 131 

another and better fire engine appeared. The 
town having declined to buy an engine, funds 
were raised by subscription and Capt. Benjamin 
Roberts was sent to Boston to make the purchase. 
He succeeded in securing a second-hand Hun- 
neman tub. The machine was brought down on 
the last trip of one of the coasters and landed on 
the ice down river whence it was hauled up to the 
villaoe. It was named the Medomak, and has 
done good service in many fires. 

In 1848 the town built a covered sewer on 
the south side of Main Street, from the residence 
of B. B. Haskell to the river. It is still doing 
good service. 

The Maine Telegraph Company, built in 
1848-9, opened for business in VValdoboro in 
1849, in the westerly store of the Clark building. 
Thomas D. Currier was the first operator. Jo- 
seph Clark of Waldoboro, was a director. With 
him were B. C. Bailey of Bath, Abner Stetson of 
Damariscotta, Edward O'Brien of Thomaston, 
Knott Crocket of East Thomaston, (now Rock- 
land). During the last twenty years of its exis- 
tence, before it was absorbed by the Western 
Union Telegraph Company, more of its capital 
stock was owned in Waldoboro than in any place 
in the State outside of Bangor. 

The war with Mexico caused no excitement 
here. The only man from Waldoboro in the ser- 



^ 



132 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

vice was William H. Stahl, who was a marine and 
was with the fleet at Vera Cruz. 

A character, who attracted much attention at 
this time, was John Fellows, a soldier who had 
served under Napoleon. He lived and died at 
East Waldoboro. 

The census of 1850 shows a steady increase, 
the population of the town being 4199. 

The store of Gorham Smouse was burned 
and later the store of Schwartz & Castner 

In 1853 Joseph Clark completed a fine brick 
building on the site now occupied by Waltz's fur- 
niture establishment. 

The Fourth of July of 1853 was celebrated in 
an elaborate manner. A military company was 
raised and drilled for the occasion by Capt. Wil- 
liam S. Cochran.' The uniform of this company 
consisted of white trousers, black coats and black 
glazed caps. A supply of muskets was obtained 
from the State. The Bucksport brass band fur- 
nished music. After parading the streets an 
elaborate dinner was spread under the trees in 
front of the residence of Charles S. Brown, where 
F. W. Scott now resides. 

About 1853 a fire company was organized by 
young men and boys of Waldoboro Village and a 
committee went to Warren and bought a small 

I. General Cochran came from Wiscasset and carried on a sailloft 
here many years. He removed to Rockland where he died. 



PERIOD FROM 1840 TO i860. 133 

fire engine for $25. George Sproul contributed 
a supply of hose. The company was known as 
"Fire Fly No. 3." The company did good work 
especially in the fire of 1854, when they did much 
to stop the spread of the fire from the Edward 
Benner house to that of Aaron Kaler on Pleasant 
Street. The boys finally got into a wrangle and 
the company broke up. The last we knew of the 
tub it was used by Isaac B. Miller for raising cab- 
bage plants. 

Rufus Rich, who had operated an iron found- 
ry on Main Street, sold out to Atwell & Harriman 
(C. C. Atwell and M. B. Harriman), who sub- 
sequently built a foundry near the Sproul mill. 
In 1855 they sold to Isaac Boyd and Samuel 
Vance. Some three years later this partnership 
was dissolved and Mr. Boyd continued the busi- 
ness. April 14, 1868, Mr. Boyd died and his son, 
James P., succeeded to the business which he car- 
ried on till the foundry, both iron and brass, was 
destroyed by fire in 1893. 

The year 1854 began with better prospects 
of business in Waldoboro than any year before or 
since. The shipyards were never more active; the 
mechanic never commanded higher wages ; the 
situation of affairs was never more prosperous. 
Yet in one brief hour was this condition of affairs 
changed, and many a man who went to his busi- 



> 



134 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

ness in the morning with a consciousness of a 
competence returned at night with a knowledge 
of his poverty. On the 25th day of August, about 
one o'clock P. M., a fire broke out in the stable 
connected with the hotel, and with the whole 
square of buildings to Jefferson street, and in less 
time than is required to relate it, the whole was in 
flames. Thence taking a south-easterly direction 
it burned its way through the village with such 
rapidity, that in less than forty minutes from the 
discovery of the fire, every portion was enveloped 
in one sheet of flame, and the people in many 
cases barely escaped with their lives. So exten- 
sive was the conflagration, that not a store nor 
workshop was left, and more than seventy families 
were rendered homeless, and would have suffered 
for the common necessaries of life, but for the un- 
exampled liberality of the citizens of neighboring 
towns, who furnished them with provisions and 
clothing. Both Banks (the contents were saved) , 
the Custom House, Post-office and hotel, several 
livery stables, a large number of dwelling houses, 
thirty-seven stores, wath their contents, one ship 
and one barque, together with the timber for 
another large ship, were destroyed almost as if by 
the lio^htenino;'s blast. The whole loss was esti- 
mated at upwards of half a million dollars, not 
more than a third of which was covered by insur- 
ance, and much of this w-as in companies entirely 



PERIOD FROM 1H40 TO i860. 135 

worthless. The engine companies of Thomaston 
and Damariscotta arrived in the evening, and 
rendered efficient service in subduing the smoul- 
dering fires among the ruins. The fire occurred 
Friday, and the following Sunday immense crowds 
of people from adjoining towns visited the ruins. 
Before it was hardly safe to traverse the burnt 
district, our merchants began to move on build- 
ings for their temporary accomodation, and with 
an energy, which has not been excelled by Port- 
land, Chicago or Boston, commenced to rebuild 
with such substantial structures, that in a year the 
village presented a better appearance than before. 

The Federal government purchased a lot of 
land, which had been an orchard, of Hon. Isaac 
Reed, on which in 1855 the present Custom 
House and Post-office was erected. In 190S, this 
building was enlarged and very much improved. 

In the spring of 1856 a military company was 
organized, called the Conrad Rifle Guards. The 
officers were Lincoln L. Kennedy, Captain, John 
Richards, First Lieutenant, George W. Caldwell, 
Second Lieutenant, George W. Wildes, Third 
Lieutenant, Ambrose C. Weeks, Fourth Lieuten- 
ant. The Guards were equipped with rifles and 
the uniform which was procured in Boston, con- 
sisted of black frock coat, faced with green and 
gold, grey trousers with green stripe, the regula- 
i'on army cap with green fountain plume. The 



136 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

company was drilled in Scott's tactics by sergeant 
J. B. Greenhalgh of Rockland. 

June 17th, 1856, the body of Conrad Heyer, 
who died Feb. 19, 1856, was reburied with mili- 
tary honors in the German Cemetery. Conrad 
Heyer, who had been a revolutionary soldier, 
was the first child born here after the first per- 
manent settlement. It was a day long to be 
remembered in Waldoboro. Thousands of people 
came, said to have been the largest number ever 
assembled in town. At 1 1 a. m., Col. A. W. 
Clark, with aids M. M. Rawson and W. S. Brown, 
appeared mounted and heading the Conrad Rifle 
Guards, 32 rifles, with the Bath Cornet Band, 
marched to Farrington's Corner to receive the 
Rockland City Guards, which mustered 57 mus- 
kets, under command of Capt. Hiram G. Berry,' 
appearing with the Rockland Band. This com- 
pany made an imposing appearance in their 
handsome uniforms and big bear skin hats. The 
two companies marched to the new hall in 
Tebbetts & Fish's block where a collation was 
served. In the afternoon the line was formed 
with the Rockland Guards as escort. Then came 
the hearse suitably draped with the American flag, 
followed by the Conrad Guards and a large con- 



I. Hiram G. Berry entered the army as Colonel of the Fourth Maine 
Regiment, was promoted to Brigadier and Major General and was killed 
while commanding the 2d Division of the 3d Army Corps at Chancellors- 
ville. 



PERIOD FROM 1840 TO i860. 137 

course of citizens. At the grave a dirge was 
played by one of the bands, prayer was offered by 
Rev. Mr. Stone, pastor of the Congregational 
Church, followed by a second dirge, and three 
volleys of musketry fired by the Rockland Guards. 
At the old church the exercises were as follows: 
Reading the 46th Psalm, Rev. Joseph Kalloch, 
singing "Landing of the Pilgrims" by a large 
choir outside the church, prayer by Rev. Mr. 
Kalloch, hymn in German by Christian Schwier 
and his two sisters. Dr. Frederick Robie,' Presi- 
dent of the day, then read a letter from Rev. D. 
M. Mitchell, regretting his inability to be present. 
He then introduced Rev. John Dodge, who pro- 
nounced an eloquent eulogy. The choir sang 
again, prayer was offered by Rev. Mr. Byrne of 
North Waldoboro, and the benediction was pro- 
nounced by Rev. Enos Trask of Nobleboro. The 
procession was reformed and marched back to the 
village where the Rockland Guards drilled for a 
time and attracted much attention by the pre- 
cision and rapidity of their manoeuvres. At 5 p. 
m. the two companies, with invited guests, sat 
down to a sumptuous entertainment provided by 
the Conrad Guards. Rev. Joseph Kalloch asked 
the blessing upon the occasion. No speeches or 
sentiments were offered. Immediately after the 

I. Governor Rohie was practicing medicine in Waldoboro at that 
time. 



138 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

repast the Conrad Guards escorted their guests to 
Farrington's Corner where carriages were taken 
for home. In the evening General Cochran in- 
vited the Conrad Guards and Bath Band to his 
home where they were splendidly entertained. 

The Fennelly Fund, often mentioned in town 
reports, came by the will of Mrs. Elizabeth F. 
Gurney, who died in Boston. Her bequest was 
as follows: "I give to the town of Waldoboro, 
where I was born, one thousand dollars to be in- 
vested on interest forever, and to be called the 
Fennelly Ftmd, the income thereof to be applied 
to poor but respectable widows of that town, and 
paid to them annually, preference to be given to 
descendants of German settlers of that town." 
Mrs. Gurney was a daughter of Peter Hilt. Her 
mother was Polly Klous. She married Dr. Fen- 
nelly of Boston, a man of wealth, and after his 
death married Mr. Gurney. Among her other 
gifts v^^as the elegant glass chandelier which for- 
merly adorned the Baptist church. Mrs. Wm .F. 
Storer was her neice. 

The Waldoboro & Thoniaston Steam Naviga- 
tion Company was formed and the steam pro- 
peller General Knox, of 259 tons, was built in 
Philadelphia. She arrived here in August, 1854, 
and commenced running from Boston to Waldo- 
boro and Thomaston alternately under command 
of Capt. Lewis Winchenbach. She was put on the 



PERIOD FROM 1840 TO i860. 139 

Penobscot route in 1855. That fall she was sold 
at auction to Capt. J. A. Creighton for $16,000 
and he sold her to Boston parties at an advance 
of $4,000. She was lost during the Crimean war. 

In September, 1856, a militia muster was 
held in Solomon Frock's field, the last of the 
militia musters. The Rockland City Guards, 
Rockland City Grays, Conrad Guards and an ar- 
tillery company (from Damariscotta Mills, we 
think,) composed the battalion which was com- 
manded by Col. Burns of Rockland. Davis Till- 
son acted as Adjutant. The Division Com- 
mander, Gen. William S. Cochran, and staff were 
escorted to the muster field and reviewed the 
troops. During the last day, a company of old 
time militia was revived and marched upon the 
field under command of Major Thurston Vinal. 

March 19, 1857, Charles Havener, a revo- 
lutionary soldier, died and was buried with mili- 
tary honors by the Conrad Guards. 

After the fire of 1854, schools for the older 
scholars, (the schools had not been graded,) were 
held in the vestry of the Baptist church. Numer- 
ous district school meetings were held and it was 
finally decided to build the brick school house, 
which was erected in 1857. 

The Waldoboro Bank was org^anized Ausf. 8, 
1858, with the following officers and directors: 
President, Isaac Reed; Cashier, B. B. Haskell; 



140 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

directors, Isaac Reed, John Sides, Solomon Shu- 
man, George Farrington, Augustus Welt. This 
bank closed business in September, 1884, with 
the same officers and directors. 

About this time a brass band was organized, 
the first in town, which kept up its organization 
for several years and was succeeded by other 
bands, the village generally having a band, while 
others were formed later in different parts of the 
town. 

A panic occurred in Union hall caused by the 
explosion of a camphine lamp. Several young 
people jumped from the third story window and 
were seriously injured, while many were injured 
in the hall by being thrown down and trampled 
upon. 

The business directory of the village at this 
time comprised the following names: John Bul- 
finch, John H. Kennedy, Albion P. Oakes, S. S. 
Marble and Edward A. Reed, attorneys at law; A. 
Hovey & Son, Winslow & Austin, Isaac Reed, 
Otis Miller, Henry Kennedy, J. M. & F. A. Hahn, 
H. B. Levensaler, Joseph Clark, James Cook, 
Miller & Eugley, Schwartz & Castner, Edward 
Benner, Daniel Light, John Sides, George Kaler, 
T. D. Currier, Kaler & Chapman, Morse & Cald- 
well, M. M. Rawson, Genthner & Atwell, W. S. 
Brown, merchants; George M. Allen, jeweler; 
John Balch, druggist; E. V. Philbrooks, boots and 



PERIOD FROM 1840 TO i860. 141 

shoes; John W, Tebbetts, Isaac French, cabinet 
makers; A. W. Clark, J. W. Miller, lumber 
dealers; Lewis S. Soule, doors, sash and blinds; J. 
Ludwig, E, E. Chapman, stoves and tinware; 
Charles F. Smith, harnessmaker ; Daniel Lincoln, 
hotel; R. Robinson, boarding house; W. H. 
Mathews, eating house; H. B. Woodbridge, 
Daniel Lincoln, Richards & Burkett, William H. 
Castner, livery stable ; Soule & Ewell, carding and 
oakum mills; George Sproul, carding, grist and 
saw mills ; Boyd & Vance, iron foundry ; William 
White, William G. Waltz, Francis Johnson, 
George Farrington, Nathaniel Mathews, black- 
smiths. 



CHAPTER XVII. 

FROM i860 TO THE CENTENNIAL. THE CIVIL WAR 
PERIOD. 

In i860 the town reached its largest popula- 
tion, the enumeration that year showing 4,569. 
The same year Knox County was formed from 
portions of Lincoln and Waldo counties. 

In the war for the suppression of the south- 
ern rebellion and the preservation of the Union 
of the United States, threatened by the secession 
of eleven States, Waldoboro filled its part. May 
II, 1 86 1, on motion of B. B. Haskell, the town 
adopted the following resolutions: 

Whereas rebellion and civil war exists in 
several States of the Union, therefore 

Resolved, that we are in favor of sustaining 
the Union, the Constitution, and the enforcement 
of the laws, and that we are in favor of the enlist- 
ment of a company of volunteers in this town. 

Voted that the sum of three thousand dollars 
be appropriated and placed at the disposal of the 
selectmen, to be expended, in part or in whole, 
for the purposes hereafter provided. 

Voted that six dollars a month be paid to 
each man, having a family, and four dollars a 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 143 

month to each single man, inhabitants of this 
town, who shall enlist in a company to be formed 
here, the time to commence when said company 
shall be mustered into service, and continue while 
absent from the State, in accordance with an act 
of the extra session of the legislature ; and if the 
family of any such volunteers shall on account of 
sickness or death, stand in need of further assis- 
tance, the selectmen may, at their discretion, fur- 
nish it to such family, and they are authorized to 
furnish conveyance for said company to such place 
as they may be ordered by the Governor. 

On motion of Henry Kennedy, voted that 
the selectmen be authorized to negotiate a loan of 
the money, or any part of it, that may be needed 
in any contingency. 

July 28, 1862, tiie town voted to pay to each 
volenteer in the quota called for $100, and the 
selectmen were authorized to borrow the sum 
necessary to pay the volunteers. This was for 
three years. 

August 23, 1862, another town meeting was 
held to provide for enlisting the town's quota for 
nine months men instead of resorting to a draft. 
The sum of $5,000 was appropriated and the 
selectmen were authorized to pay each volunteer 
under this call, $100. 

Sept 9, 1S62, the town appropriated $9,500 
(including the $500 previously raised) to pay 



144 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

soldiers' bounties. The two banks loaned the 
town $4,500 each. 

July 21, 1863, the town voted to pay $100 to 
each man drafted, or his substitute when accept- 
ed. At an adjourned town meeting July 25, 1863, 
it was further voted to pay a sum not exceeding 
$200 to each man drafted, or furnishing a substi- 
tute, and accepted. 

August 3, 1863, the town voted to authorize 
the selectmen to make arrangements to bring 
Company A, 21st Maine Regiment home from 
Augusta. At the same meeting the selectmen 
were directed to go to Augusta to attend to the 
wants of drafted men. 

April 4, 1864, the town voted to ratify and 
confirm all former votes and doings and all con- 
tracts made by the selectmen, or other persons, in 
behalf of the town, in procuring funds and raising 
this town's proportion of men required under the 
several calls for soldiers, to this time. 

^ug. 23, 1864, the town voted to raise $300 
for bounty to each man required to make up the 
quota of the town, under the call of the President, 
July 18, 1864, who shall volunteer to go into the 
army or navy. 

Aug. 23, 1864, a committee previously ap- 
pointed, reported in favor of raising $11,631.35 
by taxation for the purpose of carrying out vote 
of town in enlistment of soldiers. Nov. 5, 1864, 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 145 

the selectmen were authorized to borrow any 
further sums that may be necessary to pay bal- 
ance due for furnishing recruits. They were also 
authorized to pay for each recruit hereafter enlist- 
ed a sum not exceeding $450. 

April 17, 1865, the town voted to refund to 
each person the amount subscribed and paid for 
the purpose of raising funds to obtain recruits. 
June 2, 1866, the town voted to refund money 
paid out by individuals, who put in substitutes 
and to take up notes given by drafted men. B. 
B. Haskell reported for the committee chosen for 
that purpose, 535 different persons had subscribed 
$18,225.65. 

The indebtedness of the town reported by 
the Treasurer, March 3, i860, was $193.34. April 
17, 1865, it was $65,172.57. During that period 
the town had raised for war purposes by taxation 
$13,000. This would indicate disbursements ag- 
gregating seventy-five thousand dollars on account 
of the war. The people of the town also con- 
tributed $1750 for hospital supplies, etc. The 
town is credited with furnishing 457 men. 

During the first year of the war no company, 
or part of a company, was raised in town, but men 
enlisted in different regiments, particularly in the 
Fourth Maine. While the Damariscotta company 
of that regiment was marching through the village, 
a sad fatality occurred, by the bursting of a cannon 



146 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

with which a sakite was being fired on Clark's 
wharf. A piece of the bursting gun was thrown 
up over the buildings and, coming down upon the 
head of Gilman Kuhn, killed him instantly. 

The last part of July and first of August, 
1862, fifty volunteers were secured, which united 
with thirty men from Bristol and twenty from 
Union, became Company E, Twentieth Maine In- 
fantry. This regiment was mustered into the U. 
S. service Aug. 29, 1862, and participated in all 
the great battles of the war from the Antietam to 
Appomattox, bringing home colors upon which 
were inscribed the names of nineteen battles. 
When the original regiment was mustered out of 
the U. S. service, June 4, 1865, the recruits with 
the recruits of the Sixteenth Maine and the First 
Sharpshooters were incorporated into a regiment 
called the Twentieth Maine, which was finally 
mustered out July 26, 1865. On the seventeenth 
of June, 1865, eleven survivors of the VValdoboro 
quota, after three years' service, arrived home and 
were provided with a reception in Union hall. Five 
had been killed, two died in confederate prisons, 
two had deserted, and the remainder had pre- 
viously been discharged from wounds or disease. 
The individual war record of this company is as 
follows : 

Captain Atherton W. Clark, mustered intoU. 
S. service, Aug. 29, 1862, Brevet Major Oct. 25, 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 147 

1864, for gallant and distinguished services at 
battles of Peebles Farm and Hatcher's Run, Va., 
promoted Major, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, 
March 13, 1865, for gallant conduct in battles be- 
fore Petersburg, Va. Discharged May 29, 1865, 
died in Waldoboro, April, 1882. 

First Sergeant James H. Stanwood, mustered 
into service Aug. 29, 1862, promoted First Lieu- 
tenant Co. C, wounded at Gravelly Run, Va., 
March, 1865, discharged May 15, 1865, died in 
Waldoboro, Feb. 12, 1898. 

Sergeant Henry F. Sidelinger, mustered into 
service Aug. 29, 1862, promoted to First Lieuten- 
ant Co. E and Captain Co. K, Brevet Major, April 
9, 1865, for gallant and meritorious conduct in 
Appomattox campaign, discharged June 4, 1865, 
died in California. 

Sergeant Thomas R. Hogue, mustered Aug. 
29, 1862, promoted Second Lieutenant Co. E, re- 
signed Aug. 15, 1863, re-enlisted in Co. H, 
Second Mass. Cavalry, gun shot wound in thigh 
at Fisher Hill, discharged August, 1865. 

Corporal Henry S. Mathews, mustered Aug. 
29, 1862, discharged for disability Dec. 29, 1862, 
enlisted in Coast Guards, Feb. 3, 1865, discharged 
July 6, 1865, died in Thomaston. 

Corporal Raymond W. Hoffses, mustered 
Aug. 29, 1862, wounded battle of Wilderness, 
May 5, 1864. foot amputated by confederate sur- 



148 HISTORY OF VVALDOBORO. 

geons, discharged Dec. 12, 1864, died in Thomas- 
ton. 

Corporal Hiram VV. Kaler, mustered Aug. 
29, 1862, transferred to InvaHd Corps, Sept. i, 
1863. 

Corporal Nathan S. Chapman, mustered Aug. 
29, 1862, transferred to Invalid Corps, Nov. 14, 
1863. Residence New London, Ohio. 

Corporal William H. Stahl, mustered x^ug. 
29, 1862, transferred to Invalid Corps, served as a 
marine during Mexican War, died at North Wal- 
doboro, March 3, 1906. 

Musician William Edward Ludwig, mustered 
Aug. 29, 1862, died in Waldoboro, while at home 
on sick leave, Nov. 19, 1864. 

Musician Gardner Ludwig, mustered Aug. 
29, 1862, discharged Dec. 27, 1862, later served 
in U. S. Army, died in Portland, Oregon, in 1891. 

Private Calvin Bates, mustered Aug. 29, 
1862, promoted corporal, captured in the Wilder- 
ness, May 5, 1864, lost feet from exposure in pris- 
on, died in Manchester, N. H. 

George G. Benner, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
promoted corporal and First Sergeant, wounded 
battle of Wilderness, May 5, 1864, discharged June 
4, 1865, died in Waldoboro, Oct. 9, 1892. 

Charles E. Bickmore, mustered Aug. 29, 
1862, gun shot wound right shoulder, near 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 149 

Spottysylvania, May 12, 1864, disharged June 4, 
1865. 

Lowell Brock, mustered Aug. 29. 1862, taken 
prisoner at Fair Play, Md., July 10, 1863, and 
never heard from afterwards. 

Edward K. Chapman, mustered Aug. 29, 
1862, wounded in shoulder at Bethesda Church, 
Va., June 3, 1864, discharged June 4, 1865. 

William A. Cole, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
discharged for disability, May 5, 1863, died at 
South Framingham, Mass. 

Sherman Cummings, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
transferred to Invalid Corps. 

John O. A. Fernald, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
discharged for disability, died in Augusta. 

Lewis G. Flanders, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
taken prisoner July 10, 1863, died in Andersonville 
prison March 16, 1864, buried in National Ceme- 
tery there. 

Cyrus B. Hall, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, dis- 
charged Dec. 30, 1862, died in Belfast, Maine. 

George Allen Hoch, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
wounded and prisoner battle of Wilderness, May 
5, 1864, died May 14, 1864. 

Emerson VY. Hoffses, mustered Aug. 29, 
1862, discharged Jan. 30, 1863, died in Maple- 
wood, Mass., Oct. 13, 1903. 

Seldon D. Hunt, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
discharged Jan. 30, 1863, deceased. 



150 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Charles Keizer, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
killed at Laurel Hill, Va., May 8, 1864. 

Frederick Kinsel, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
killed at Rappahannock, Va., Nov. 7, 1863. 

William H. Knight, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
deserted, July 5, 1863. 

Elijah S. Levensaler, mustered, Aug. 29, 
1862, in every battle of the regiment, discharged, 
June 4, 1865, died in Waldoboro, Feb. 5, 1901. 

William H. Levensaler, mustered Aug. 29, 
1862, promoted Corporal, detached in Division 
Sharpshooters, Aug. i, 1864, on skirmish line in 
every battle from Petersburg to Appomattox, dis- 
charged June 4, 1865. 

Leander N. Mank, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
wounded and died of wounds Sept. 18, 1864. 

Tolman Matthews, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
discharged March 27, 1863. 

Charles H. Mero, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
discharged June 4, 1865, residence Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Leander J. Miller, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
discharged May 22, 1865, died May 22, 1872, 
from injuries on railroad. 

Orris G. Miller, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
discharged May 29, 1865. 

Samuel L. Miller, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
acting Sergeant Major Gettysburg campaign, pro- 
moted Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant Feb. 



CIVIL l^AR PERIOD. 151 

24, 1864, promoted Second Lieutenant Co. A, 
Dec. I, 1864, discharged June 4, 1865. 

Alden F. Miller, 2d, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
discharged for disability, May 9, 1863, died in 
Waldoboro, Feb. 7, 1892. 

John H. Mink, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
deserted July 3, 1863, died in Waldoboro, March 

31. 1905- 

Orchard F. Mink, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863, discharged 
June 4, 1865. 

Philip Mink, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, dis- 
charged March 30, 1863, died on passage home. 

David M. Overlock, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
promoted First Sergeant Co. E, promoted First 
Lieutenant Co. D, discharged March 10, 1865, 
died in Chicago, 111., July 16, 1873. 

Gardner Schwartz, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
promoted Sergeant, killed at Fair Play, Md., July 
10, 1863, body brought to Waldoboro for burial, 

John M. Shuman, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
promoted Sergeant, discharged June 15, 1865, 
died in Waldoboro, Dec. 7, 1908. 

Josiah Sidelinger, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
discharged June 4, 1865, died in Orleans, Mass. 

James R. Sprague, Mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
transferred to Invalid Corps. 

Barden Turner, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
discharged for disability, Sept. 21, 1S63. 



152 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Enos. T. Waltz, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, 
promoted Sergeant, discharged June 4, 1865, died 
in Waldoboro, March 26, 1868. 

Reuben Wotton, mustered Aug. 29, 1892, 
discharged April 22, 1865, died in Waldoboro. 

The following recruits from Waldoboro joined 
the Twentieth Maine Regiment at different times : 

Robert Creamer, enlisted Dec. 22, 1863, dis- 
charged June 13, 1865. 

Frederick E. Creamer, enlisted March 10, 
1864, discharged May 31, 1865. 

Orrin G. Mink enlisted March 30, 1864, 
missing in action, June 3, 1864, probably died in 
confederate prison. 

Simon S. Orff, enlisted Dec. 24, 1863, died 
in service Aug. 8, 1864. 

Moses S. Walter, enlisted Dec. 24, 1863, 
discharged Nov. 20, 1864. 

Allison Sprague, enlisted Jan. 5, 1864, dis- 
charged June 4, 1865. 

Very soon after the Twentieth Maine Regi- 
ment left the State, a call was made for eight 
regiments from Maine, to serve nine months. 
Under this call a company of volunteers was 
promptly enlisted in Waldoboro, and being the 
first full company at the rendezvous in Augusta, 
became company A, Twenty-first Maine Regi- 
ment. Therefore in less than two months Waldo- 
boro furnished one hundred and fifty volunteers . 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 153 

The officers of Company A were Captain Isaac 
W. Comery, First Lieutenant Aaron W. Wallace, 
Second Lieutenant Daniel W. Demuth. The 
citizens of W'aldoboro procured regulation swords 
which were presented to these officers. The 
presentation was made by Hon. Isaac Reed on 
the camp ground, Augusta. Captain Comery 
and both Lieutenants responded in acceptance of 
the gift, after which Samuel W. Jackson, Esq., 
chairman of the Selectmen, addressed the officers 
and soldiers. The company was mustered into 
the U. S. service, Oct. 13, 1862, and was assigned 
with the regiment to the army of General Banks 
in Louisiana where malaria was more fatal than 
the bullets of the enemy. Besides those killed 
and wounded in the seige of Port Hudson, many 
died in the service, others died on the way to 
Maine, and still others died after reaching home. 
The war record of the Twenty-first Maine Regi- 
ment is as follows : 

Regimental Quartermaster William S. Brown, 
mustered Sept. 19, 1862, Acting Quartermaster, 
First Brigade, First Division, two months, muster- 
ed out with reoiment. 

Chaplain Phineas Fliggins, mustered Sept. 
19, 1862, resigned Jan. 23, 1863, and was dis- 
charged by order of War Department, died in 
Damariscotta, Jan. 14, 1878. 

Capt. Isaac W. Comery was mustered Senior 



154 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Captain of the regiment, having previously de- 
dined a commission in the navy, discharged with 
his regiment, offered command of a battery which 
he decHned, Hving in Waldoboro at age of ninety 
years. 

First Lieutenant Aaron W. Wallace killed in 
a charge on the enemy's works, at Port Hudson, 
May 27, 1863. 

Second Lieutenant Daniel W. Demuth. dis- 
charged with regiment, died in Waldoboro, Oct. 
28, 1895. 

First Sergeant George W. Young, commis- 
sioned First Lieutenant, discharged with regiment. 

Sergeant Washington Bornheimer, volunteer 
and Acting Lieutenant of storming party May, 27, 
1863, discharged with regiment. 

Sergeant Warren H. Sidelinger, discharged 
with regiment. 

Sergeant William H. P. Wyman, detailed 
color sergeant, discharged with regiment, died in 
Waldoboro, July 13, 1884. 

Sergeant David Rice, discharged with regi- 
ment, died in Auburn, Maine, July 7, 1897. 

Corporal Frederick W. Young, promoted 
Sergeant, discharged with regiment, residence, 
Fitchburg, Mass., 

Corporal Jerome Hall, discharged with regi- 
ment, died in Nobleboro, April 16, 1903. 

Corporal Orchard S. Sidelinger, died at 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 155 

Baton Rouge, La., April 23, 1863, remains 
brought to Waldoboro for burial. 

Corporal Hiram W. Brown, discharged with 
regiment, died in Waldoboro, Aug. 25, 1899. 

Corporal Hector M. B. Demuth, died in Bos- 
ton, on way home, Aug. 8, 1863. 

Corporal Addison Keizer, wounded. May 27, 
1863, discharged with regiment, residence, Rock- 
land, Maine. 

Corporal Cyrus Shuman, discharged with re- 
giment, died at North Waldoboro, Aug. 22, 1863. 

Musician William H. Groton, discharged with 
regiment, died and was buried at sea, Sept. 21, 
1868. 

Freeman C. Benner, died at Mound City, 111., 
Aug. 16, 1863. 

Lowell H. Benner, (brother of Freeman) 
died March 24, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., buried 
in National Cemetery there. 

Winfield S. Benner, discharged for disability, 
March 2, 1863, died in Waldoboro, Oct. 7, 1867. 

Webster Benner, discharged with regiment, 
residence, Sauk Centre, Minn. 

Given C. Bogues, discharged with regiment, 
died in Waldoboro, Aug. 24, 1863. 

Byron M. Castner, left in hospital at Mound 
City, III, died in Waldoboro, Dec. 3, 1896. 

George T. Cole, died at Baton Rouge, La., 
May 19, 1S63, buried in National Cemetery. 



156 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Levi Crammer, died at Baton Rouge, La., 
May 13, 1863, buried in National Cemetery. 

Jeremiah H. Crammer, discharged with regi- 
ment, died in Waldoboro, Dec. 11, 1901. 

Allen M. Creamer, promoted Corporal, dis- 
charged with regiment, residence, Thomaston. 

Ancil L. Creamer, discharged with regiment, 
residence, Pringhar, Iowa. 

Webster Crammer, discharged with regiment, 
residence, Sauk Centre, Minn. 

Danby L. Creamer, discharged with regi- 
ment, re-enlisted in Co., B, First Sharpshooters, 
transferred to 20th Maine, discharged July 26, 
1865, died in Waldoboro, March 2, 1892. 

Elisha E. Creamer, discharged with regiment, 
residence, Bremen, Maine. 

Orrin Creamer, (brother of Elisha E.) died 
at Baton Rouge, La,, Feb. 17, 1863. 

Ambrose Cummings, Jr., died at East New 
York, Feb. 25, 1863. 

Richard Dolham, discharged with regiment, 
died at North Waldoboro, Sept. i, 190S. 

Gardiner Feyler, discharged for disability, 
Oct. 31, 1862. 

Moses Feyler, discharged with regiment, lost 
both eyes by explosion in granite quarry, died in 
Waldoboro, March 16, 1909. 

William Feyler, (brother of Moses and Card- 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 157 

ner) discharged with regiment, died in Jersey 
City, N. J., Oct. 24, 1898. 

Benjamin Flanders, died April 4, 1863, buried 
in National Cemetery at Baton Rogue, La. 

Joseph M. Flanders, discharged with regi- 
ment, died at South Waldoboro, July 17, 1904. 

Moses Folsom, discharged with regiment, 
died in Waldoboro, ]\Iay 10, 1882. 

Cyrus H. Genthner, died on steamer from 
Port Hudson, buried on shore by comrades. 

Newell W. Genthner, died May 25, 1863, at 
Baton Rouge, La., buried in National Cemetery. 

Sandford I. Genthner, discharged with regi- 
ment. 

William H. Gleason, reported as deserter, 
Jan. 8, 1863, was sick in camp at East New York, 
and his father took him out of camp and home^ 
never returned to reofiment, residence, South 
Framingham, Mass. 

John P". Grafton, promoted Corporal, dis- 
charged with regiment, residence, Milford, N. H. 

Edwin S. Head, discharged with regiment, 
died in Janesville, Wis., Jan. 18, 19 10. 

Ambrose Hoch, wounded at Port Hudson, 
May 27, 1863, six weeks in hospital on account of 
wound, discharged with regiment, re-enlisted in 
First Sharpshooters, transferred to 20th Maine, 
discharged July 26, 1865. 

Gideon Hoch, 2d, discharged with regiment, 



158 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

re-enlisted in First Sharpshooters, transferred to 
20lh Maine, discharged July 26, 1865, died in 
Nobleboro, Feb. 25, 1899. 

Sylvester L. Hoch, discharged with regi- 
ment. 

Oliver Hoffses, discharged with regiment, 
residence, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

David B. Kaler, promoted Corporal, dis- 
charged with regiment, died at North Upton, 
Mass., July 7, 1895. 

George F. Kaler, detailed on pioneer corps, 
discharged with regiment, died in Waldoboro, 
Aug. 24, 1863. 

Nelson Kaler. wounded at Port Hudson, 
May 27. 1863. by musket ball in left side, dis- 
charged with regiment, residence. Thomaston, 
Maine. 

Otis M. Kaler. discharged for re-enlistment 
Jul)- 24, 1863, served in Co. B, Headquarters 
Troops, Department of the Gulf, discharged July 
30, 1864. Residence, Somerville, Mass. 

Thomas A. Kaler, discharged with regiment. 

Joseph A. Kaler, discharged with regiment, 
re-enlisted in Coast Guards, promoted Corporal, 
discharged with company. 

James H. Ludwig, discharged with regiment, 
died in Waldoboro. Sept. 10, 1863. 

Edward F. Manning, died in Baton Rogue, 
La., June 15, 1863, buried in National Cemetery. 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 159 

Gilmore Miller, discharged with regiment, 
died in Macon, Neb., Sept. 19, 1882. 

Benjamin M. Mink, discharged with regi- 
ment, re-enlisted in First Sharpshooters, trans- 
ferred to 20th Maine, discharged July 26, 1865. 

John P. Mink, discharged with regiment, 
died at East VValdoboro, Nov. 18, 1884. 

Jeremiah Mink, (brother of John P.) dis- 
charged with regiment, re-enlisted in Co. B, 20th 
Maine, Nov. 4, 1864, taken prisoner at battle of 
Wilderness, wounded by guard in Anderson 
prison, residence Orland, Maine. 

Henry J. Mink, died June 30, 1863, at Baton 
Rouge, La., buried in National Cemetery. 

Jotham Mink, discharged with regiment, died 
at North Waldoboro, June 14, 1908. 

Horace A. Nash, died May 29, of wounds re- 
ceived in charge at Port Hudson, May 27, 1863, 
buried in woods near battle ground. 

William D. Nash, died at Baton Rosfue, La,, 
June 12, 1863, buried in National Cemetery. 

Austin E. Oliver, died at Baton Rogue, La., 
March 4, 1863, buried in National Cemetery. 

John M. Pinkham, discharged with regiment, 
re-enlisted in Co. B, 20th Maine, killed in Battle 
of Wilderness, May 5, 1864. 

Joseph W. Shuman, died at North Waldo- 
boro, Aug. 17, 1863. 



160 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

John W. Sidelinger, died at North Waldobo- 
ro, Aug. 28, 1863. 

Franklin Sprague, discharged with regiment, 
residence, North VValdoboro. 

Chas. W. Seiders, discharged with regiment, 
died in IndianapoHs, Oct. 31, 1908. 

Otis Sprague, discharged with regiment, died 
in Waldoboro, June 26, 1901. 

Sewall Sprague, died in Waldoboro, Aug. 26, 
1863. 

Henry Spratt, discharged with regiment, died 
in Catrina, Cuba, ]\Iarch, 1872. 

Larkin Teague, discharged July 24, 1863, for 
re-enlistment, re-enlisted in 6th N. Y. Infantry, 
died in New Orleans, Dec. i, 1864. 

George Vose, discharged with regiment, re- 
enlisted in Co. F, 14th Maine, promoted Corporal, 
residence, Waldoboro. 

Charles M. Wallace, died at Baton Rouge, 
La., May 25, 1863, buried in National Cemetery. 

Robert W. Welch, discharged with regiment, 
died in Knox, Maine, July 16, 1902. 

John W. Welt, left in hospital at Mound City, 
111., residence Hager City, Wis. 

Henry Wheeler, wounded at Port Hudson, 
May 27, 1863, discharged with regiment, re-en- 
listed in Co. I, 19th Mass. Infantry, discharged at 
close of war, residence North Whitefield, Maine. 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 161 

William H. Wilson, discharged with regi- 
ment, died at Thomaston, Nov. 27, 1899. 



In the following list we have endeavored to 
place not only those who enlisted from Waldo- 
boro, but also all those who ever resided in town : 

James E. Deshon, Co. F, 2Tst Maine, enlisted 
Oct. 13, 1862, discharged with regiment, died in 
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, July 3, 
1894. 

Alden M. Vannah, Co. I, 21st Maine, en- 
listed Oct. 13, 1862, discharged with regiment, 
died in Waldoboro, Sept. 26, 1908. 

Oliver Woodbury, Co. E, 21st Maine, en- 
listed Oct. 13, 1862, discharged with regiment, 
residence, Waldoboro. 

Richard Flannigan, Corporal Co. G, 21st 
Maine, promoted Sergeant, March i, 1863, 
wounded at Port Hudson, discharged with regi- 
ment, died in Portland, Nov. 12, 1903. 

Oakman F. Glidden, Sergeant Co. F, 21st 
Maine, enlisted Oct. 13, 1862, discharged with regi- 
ment, re-enlisted as Sergeant Co. E, 2d Maine 
Cavalry, promoted Second Lieutenant, discharged 
Dec. 6, 1865, last known residence Togus, Maine. 

Bradbury F. Boggs, Co. H, 4th Maine, en- 
listed June 3, 1861, transferred to Co. D, 38th 
N. Y., Sept. I, 1 86 1, detached in Battery E, ist 
R. I. Artillery (Randolph's) Feb., 1863, re-en- 



162 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

listed in battery, in November, 1863, discharged 
June 14, 1865. 

Lemuel Feyler, 30th Mass. Regiment. 

Zuinglius Hutchins, Co. I, 19th Maine, en- 
listed Aug. 25, 1862, discharged May 31, 1865. 

Edward S. Hurd, Co. C, 2d Maine. 

Francis M. Eveleth, Assistant Surgeon 7th 
Maine, mustered Aug. 21, 1861, promoted Sur- 
geon, March 12, 1863, transferred to ist Veteran 
Volunteers, Surgeon in charge of Division Hos- 
pital, mustered out with regiment June 28, 1865, 
died in Waldoboro, April 9, 1895. 

George W. Colby, born in Lisbon, Maine, 
Surgeon ist Maine Cavalry, Oct. 31, 1861, Sur- 
geon 2d Brigade, 2d Division, Cavalry Corps, 
mustered out, Nov. 25, 1864, afterwards com- 
missioned Surgeon U. S. Vols, and attached to 2d 
Division Cavalry Corps where he served till close 
of war, died in Waldoboro, Feb. 24, 1881. 

David W. Potter, mustered into 7th Maine 
band, Aug. 22, 1861, discharged by order of War 
Department, residence Waldoboro. 

Joseph Miller, Second Lieutenant, Co. E, 
10th N. J. Regiment, enlisted Oct. 8, 1861, dis- 
charged June 29, 1863, died in Augusta, March 
6, 1888. 

David T. Hartshorn, Co. F, 4th Mass. Infty., 
enlisted for three months in 1861, discharged at 
expiration of term of service. 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 163 

Charles D. Jones, 2d Maine Battery, enlisted 
Dec. 14, 1 86 1, discharged for disability March 13, 

1863, re-enlisted in First D. C. Cavalry June 5, 

1864, transferred to Co. H, ist Maine Cavalry, 
discharged Aug. i, 1865, died in Rockland. 

Lucius Bond, Co. L, 2d Maine Cavalry, en- 
listed Dec. 24, 1863, discharged Dec. 6, 1865. 

Henry Levensaler, Co. A, 2 2d Mass. Infan- 
try, served nearly three years, gun shot wound in 
arm at battle of Fair Oaks, wounded at Laurel 
Hill, Va., died in Fredericksburg, Va., May 22, 
1864. 

Arthur Payson Benner, Co I, 6th Maine, en- 
listed in Old Town, April 20, 1861, wounded in 
charge at second battle of Fredericksburg, dis- 
charged July, 1864, residence, Willimantic, Conn. 

Sylvester Davis, Co. A, 15th Maine, enlisted 
Feb. 8, 1862, re-enlisted Jan. 15, 1864, discharged 
March 16, 1866, served in Department of the 
Gulf, residence Waldoboro. 

Hiram Glidden, Farrier Co. E, 2d Maine 
Cavalry, enlisted Dec. 10, 1863, discharged Nov. 
22, 1864, died in Whitefield, in 1874. 

Byron Hussey, Co. B, ist Battalion Maine 
Infantry, enlisted March 30, 1865, died in service 
Sept. 24, 1865. 

Henderson Feyler, Co. H, 4th Maine, enlist- 
ed June 15, 1861, transferred to 38th N. Y., Sept. 
21, 1861. 



164 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Miles Jackson, Co, H, 4th Maine, enlisted 
June 15, 1 86 1, prisoner July 19, 1861. 

Alden Crockett, Co. C, 4th Maine, enlisted 
June 15, 1861, discharged July 19, 1864. 

George Jameson, Companies E and C, 17th 
U. S. Regulars, enlisted Feb. i, 1862, discharged 
June 30, 1865. 

Charles Walter, Mass. regiment. 

Benjamin F. Bogues, Co. H, 4th Maine, 
wounded at battle of Bull Run, transferred to 38th 
N. Y., Sept 21, 1 86 1, died at Yorktown, Va. 

John R. Skinner, 4th Maine, enlisted June 
15, 1 86 1, discharged July 19, 1864, died in Massa- 
chusetts, Aug. I, 1906. 

Edwin Mink, 4th Maine, enlisted Jan. i, 
1864, discharged July 10, 1864. 

Stillman Mink, 4th Maine, enlisted Jan i, 
1864, discharged July 19, 1864. 

Amandus E. Ludwig, Co. C, 4th Maine, en- 
listed June 15, 1 86 1, deserted Aug. 9, 1861. 

Emerson Overlock, Co. C, 4th Maine, en- 
listed June 15, 1 86 1, deserted Aug. 7, 1861. 

Joseph S. Shuman, Co. C, 4th Maine, en- 
listed June 15, 1861, deserted Aug. 7, 1861. 

Crowell J. Ramsey, Co. C, 4th Maine, enlist- 
ed June 15, 1 86 1, discharged July 19, 1864, died 
in New Haven, March 16, 1909. 

Silas H. Vose, Co. C, 4th Maine, enlisted 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 165 

June 15, 1 86 1, died near Lecsburcr, Va., Oct. 31, 
1864. 

Charles K. Chapman, 4th Maine, enlisted 
March 15, 1862, deserted Aug". 28, 1862. 

Lorenzo Chapman, Co. D, 4th Maine, enlist- 
ed Sept. 7, 1 86 1, missing Aug. 20, 1862. 

Harlow M. Hall, Co. E, 4th Maine, June 15, 
1 86 1, discharged July 19, 1864. 

Thomas F. Turner, Co. E, 4th Maine, enlist- 
ed June 15, 1 86 1, discharged for disability Dec. 
1 1, 1862. 

William Trowbridge, Co. G, 4th Maine, en- 
listed June 15, 1 86 1, transferred to Veteran Re- 
serve Corps March 15, 1864. 

Albert Quinby, Co. G, 4th Maine, enlisted 
March 10, 1862, wounded. 

Asa O. Hall, Co. E, 4th Maine, enlisted 
June 15, 1861, killed at battle of Bull Run, first 
man from VValdoboro killed. 

Patrick Black, Co. B, 4th Maine, enlisted 
June 15, 1 86 1, wounded Aug. 29, 1862, trans- 
ferred to Invalid Corps March 15, 1S64, died in 
Waldoboro. 

Lorenzo W. Hoffses, Co. D, 19th Maine, 
enlisted Aug 25, 1862, wounded at Gettysburg, 
July 3. 1863, discharged for wounds Aug. 27, 
1863. 

Hiram B. Hoffses, Co. D, 19th Maine, en- 



IGO HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

listed Aug. 25, 1862, died in confederate prison, 
Dec. 27, 1863. 

David H. Kimball, Co. K, 4th Maine, enlist- 
ed June 15, 1 86 1, promoted Sergeant, discharged 
Feb. 24, 1863. 

James Ludwig, Jr. .Corporal Co. I, 8th Maine, 
enlisted Feb. 29, 1864, wounded March 16, 1865, 
promoted Sergeant, discharged Jan. 24, 1866, 
died in Waldoboro. 

Alexander M. Wallace, Co. H, 4th Maine, 
enlisted June 15, 1861, discharged, July 19, 1864. 

Martin V. Hopkins, Co. D, U. S. Sharp- 
shooters, also served in navy. 

Charles B. Phenix, Co. B, ist Maine Cavalry, 
enlisted Sept. 12, 1861, orderly for General 
Meade, 1862, had a horse shot under him at 
battle of Fredericksburg, re-enlisted Dec. 29, 
1863, transferred to Navy, July 4, 1864. 

Cyrus Gross, Mass. Regiment. 

Isaac R. Patten, Co. I, 36th Mass., enlisted 
Aug. 7, 1862, killed at battle of Wilderness, May 
6, 1864. 

Gorham A. Mathews, Co. A, 3d Mass. Heavy 
Artillery, enlisted Dec. 3, 1862, transferred to 
navy, April 15, 1864, served as seaman on S. S. 
Ohio, and Canonicus, discharged as Master at 
Arms from U. S. S. Circassian, June 30, 1865, 
died Dec. 29, 1869. 

Luther C. Bornaman, Co. G, 20th Maine, en- 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 107 

listed Aug. 29, 1862, missing in action May 5, 
1864. 

Alfred P. Bateman, Co. G, 20th Maine, en- 
listed Aug. 29, 1862, discharged for disability, 
Jan 20, 1865. 

John F. Bateman, Co. G, 20th Maine, en- 
listed Aug 29, 1862, transferred to Veteran Re- 
serve Corps, Nov. 13. 1863. 

Luther C. Bateman, Co. D. 53d Mass. In- 
fantry, enlisted Sept. 2, 1862, discharged Sept. 
2, 1863, re-enlisted Sept. 7, 1864, Co. H, 2d 
Mass. Heavy Artillery, transferred to Co. E, 17 th 
Mass. Infantry, discharged June, 1865. 

Webster Hoffses, Co. D, 53 Mass. Infantry, 
enlisted Sept. 2, 1862, discharged Sept. 2, 1863, 
re-enlisted Sept. 7, 1864, Co. H, 2d Mass. Heavy 
Artillery, transferred to Co. E, 17th Mass. In- 
fantry, discharged June, 1865. 

Alfred S. Adams, ist Maine Heavy Artillery, 
enlisted Dec. 5, 1863, promoted Chaplain, Nov. 
15, 1864, discharged for disability May 20, 1865. 

Frederick Burns, Co. E, 2d Maine, enlisted 
May 28, 1 86 1, wounded at battle of Bull Run, 
died Aug. -^^o, 1862. 

James F. Marshall, Co. D, 12th N. H. In- 
fantry, enlisted Aug. 15, 1862, wounded July 2, 
1863, at Gettysburg, and June 3, 1864, at Cold 
Harbor, promoted Corporal Nov. i, 1864, dis- 



168 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

charged June 21, 1865, died in Portsmouth in 
19 10. 

Chandler Benner, Co. F, 14th Maine, enhst- 
ed Feb. 28, 1865, discharged Aug. 28, 1865, died 
in Waldoboro, Aug. 10, 1866, 

Eugene Genthner, 7th Co. unassigned, en- 
Hsted Oct. 25, 1864, discharged July 6, 1865. 

Warren D. Storer, Co. F, 14th Maine, enlist- 
ed Feb. 28, 1865, discharged Aug. 28, 1865. 

Sergeant Charles W. Sweetland, enlisted Co. 
C, U.S. Engineers, Dec. 11, 1861, discharged 
Dec. 1 1, 1864. 

Robert W. Sweetland, brother of Charles W., 
enlisted artificer Co. C, U. S. Engineers, Nov. 
20, 1 86 1, discharged Nov. 20, 1864, died in Bos- 
ton, in 1902. 

Thomas H. Sweetland, brother of Charles 
W., enlisted Co. C, U. S. Engineers, Dec. 2, 
1 86 1, discharged Dec. 2, 1864, died in Boston, 
Jan. 19, 1902. 

Hiram T. Strout, Second Lieutenant Co. B, 
I St Sharpshooters, enlisted Oct. 27, 1864, dis- 
charged May 15, 1865. 

E. Drummond Pinkham, Corporal Co. I, 8th 
Maine, enlisted Sept. 7, 1861, discharged for dis- 
ability, March 9, 1862, buried in Waldoboro. 

William N. Lash, Co. I, 8th Maine, enlisted 
Sept. 20, 1864, discharged at Raleigh, N. C, June 
30. 1865. 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 169 

Jacob C. Bogues, ist Battery, R. I. Light Ar- 
tillery, enlisted April 17, 1 861, discharged Aug. 
6, i86t, debarred from re-enlistment by injury to 
hand. 

John W. Palmer, Co. I, 3 2d Maine, enlisted 
Feb. 18, 1864, prisoner at the mine in front of 
Petersburg, prisoner at Danville and Libby, 
paroled February, 1865, transferred to Co. I, 31st 
]\Iaine, discharged July 15, 1865. 

Andrew J. Hersey, served in Co. G, 44th 
Mass. Infantry. 

Alvin Barnard, 2d Maine Battery, enlisted 
Dec. 15, 1863, discharged June 15, 1865. 

Labalister Black, ist Maine Cavalry, enlisted 
Jan. 29, 1864, wounded at Reams Station, Va., 
Aug. 25, 1864, discharged Aug. i, 1865. 

Charles Sprague, Co. I, 3d Maine, enlisted 
July 18, 1863, transferred to 17th Maine. 

George W. Light, Co. B, ist Maine Veteran 
Battalion, enlisted Dec. 7, 1861, deserted May, 
1862. 

John W. Gookin, Co. B, ist Maine Veteran 
Battalion, enlisted Dec. 4, 1862, transferred to 
navy. 

Erastus Cummings, Co. I, 20th Maine, en- 
listed Aug. 29, 1862, discharged for disability, 
April 3, 1863. 

Pierce Cumminors, Co. I, 20th Maine, enlisted 
Aug. 29, 1862, died Jan. 7, 1863. 



170 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

John D. Stahl, Co. C, 4th Maine, enlisted 
June 15, 1 86 1. 

George S. Sanders, Co. D. ist N. Y. Caval- 
ry, died in Waldoboro, Nov. 8, 1884. 

William D. Howell, four years in ist Minn. 
Regiment. 

Eugene Genthner 7th Unassigned Company, 
enlisted Oct. 25, 1864, discharged July, 6, 1865. 

Hiram B. Hoffses, Co. D, 19th Maine, en- 
listed Aug. 25, 1862, died in confederate prison, 
July 27, 1864. 

Samuel Burrows, Co. B. ist Maine Cavalry, 
enlisted Sept. 26, 1861, promoted Corporal, Oct. 
I, 1862, re-enlisted Dec. 29, 1863. promoted 
Sergeant and Q. M. Sergeant, discharged with 
regiment, Aug. i, 1865. 

Alfred L. Hilton. Co. F, 28th Maine, enlisted 
Oct. 21, 1862, discharged Aug. 31, 1863, re-en- 
listed in ist D. C. Cavalry, Feb. 29, 1864, trans- 
ferred to Co. H, ist Maine Cavalry, wounded at 
Chapin's Farm, Oct. i, 1864, left arm amputated 
at shoulder, discharged by General Orders No. 
77, residence Waldoboro. 

Charles F, Patterson, Co. B, ist Maine 
Cavalry, enlisted Dec. 24, 1863, transferred to 
navy April 19, 1864, promoted Asst. Engineer. 

John E. Rines, Co. G, 28th Maine, enlisted 
Oct. 10, 1862, discharged Dec. 19, 1862, re-enlist- 
ed in Co. L, 2d Maine Cavalry, Dec. 24, 1863, 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 171 

discharged Sept. i8, 1865, residence Waldoboro. 

Peter Kaler, Co. E, 2d Maine Cavalry, en- 
listed Dec. 10, 1863, discharged Dec. 6, 1865. 

George C. Chute, Co. L, 2d Maine Cavalry, 
enlisted Dec. 24, 1863, discharged Dec. 6, 1865, 
residence Waldoboro. 

Larkin Teague, 2d Maine Battalion, Dec. 14, 
1861, deserted Jan. 2, 1862. 

Newell H. Cushman, 7th Unassigned Co., 
enlisted Nov. i. 1864, discharged July 6, 1865, 
died in Waldoboro, Aug. 16, 1908. 

Roscoe L. Jackson, Co. F, 14th Maine, en- 
listed Feb. 28, 1865, discharged Aug. 28, 1865, 
died in Waldoboro. 

Plummer R. Nevens, Co. K, 29th Maine, en- 
listed Sept. 8, 1863, discharged Aug. 20, 1865. 

Chester D. Bennett, Co. D, 31st Maine, en- 
listed April 13, 1863, wounded in shoulder at bat- 
tle of Wilderness, discharged July 15, 1865, resi- 
dence, Waldoboro. 

W^illiam L. Allen, Co. H, ist Maine Heavy 
Artillery, enlisted July 3. 1862, wounded in arm 
and side at Cold Harbor, discharged Nov. 19, 
1864, residence, Bangor, Maine. 

Vinal B. Benner, Co. F, 14th Maine, enlisted 
Feb. 28, 1865, discharged Aug. 28, 1865. 

Lithgow L. Hilton, Co. D, 5th Maine, enlist- 
ed Dec. 31, 1 86 1, discharged Dec. 8, 1862. 

Hiram Perkins, Co. K, ist Maine Cavalry, 



172 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

enlisted Sept. 30, 1861, discharged for disability, 
May 2, 1863. 

Warren Achorn, 30th Co. unassigned, enlist- 
ed April 4, 1865, discharged May 14, 1865. 

Nehemiah Keene, Co. B, ist Sharpshooters, 
enlisted Nov. 4, 1864, transferred to 20th Maine, 
discharged July 25, 1865. 

James Crawford, Co. B, ist Sharpshooters, 
enlisted Nov. 4, 1864, transferred to 20th Maine. 

Albert D. Keene, Co. B, ist Sharpshooters, 
enlisted Nov. 4, 1864, transferred to 20th Maine. 

Joseph Nash, Jr., Co. B. ist Sharpshooters, 
transferred to 20th Maine. 

Peter Prock, Co. B, ist Sharpshooters, trans- 
ferred to 20th Maine, 

Daniel Waltz, Co. C, ist Sharpshooters, 
transferred to 20th Maine. 

Joseph J. Hoffses, Lieutenant Co. G, 20th 
Maine, mustered Aug. 29, 1862, resigned Nov. 
22, 1862. 

Frank A. Hutchins, Lieutenant Co. K, 27th 
Maine, enlisted Sept. 30, 1862, promoted Captain 
March 2, 1863, discharged July 17, 1863. 

Lorenzo V. Ludwig, 2d R. L regiment, died 
in service. 

Llewellyn O. Foster, Co. I, 23d Maine, en- 
listed Sept. 29, 1862, discharged Feb. 5, 1863, 
re-enlisted in Co. G, 30th Maine, discharged Aug. 
20, 1865, died in Waldoboro, May 30, 1909. 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 173 

Thomas Hoffses, Co. G, 30th Maine, enlist- 
ed Dec. 28, 1863, deserted April 23, 1864. 

Ezekiel Rackliff, Co. D, 19th Maine, enlisted 
Aug. 25, 1862, discharged May 31, 1865, died in 
Waldoboro, Feb. 19, 1893. 

George P. Fogler, Co. K, 19th Maine, en- 
listed Aug. 25, 1862, killed at battle of Gettys- 
burg. 

Elisha Harris, ist Maine Infantry. 

Solomon Benner, Co. I, 8th Maine, enlisted 
Sept, 7, 1861. 

Alphonso Larrabee, 7th Unassigned Com- 
pany, enlisted Oct. i, 1864, discharged July 6, 
1865. 

William Newbert, Co. I, 8th Maine, enlisted 
Oct. 8, 1863, discharged June 11, 1865. 

Thomas Wagner, Co. K, 17th Maine, died 
in confederate prison. 

Webster Feyler, Western regiment. 

Edwin Keizer, Co. H, 4th Maine, enlisted 
May I, 186 1, transferred to Co. I, 38th N. Y., 
discharged July i, 1862, died in Waldoboro, June 
16, 1892. 



So far as we have been able to learn the fol- 
lowing persons served in the U. S. Navy : 

William G. Jones, born in Curacoa, West 
Indies, enlisted in 1862, commissioned Ensign 
and Master, served in South Atlantic Squadron 



174 HISTORY OF IVALDOBORO. 

under Farragut and Foote, was commander of U. 
S. Gunboat Mohican, was present at taking Hilton 
Head, Mobile and New Orleans, assisted in cap- 
ture of confederate privateer steamer Savannah, 
died in Havre, France, in 1902. 

Gorham Parks Feyler, Acting Ensign, 1864- 
1865, served as Master in Peruvian Navy, died in 
Massachusetts Nov. 16, 1907. 

Americus V. Miller, enlisted Sept. i, 1864, 
served on U. S. S. Sabine, Brooklyn and Ottawa, 
discharged Aug. 12, 1865. 

Abel Cole, enlisted Sept. 16, 1864, wounded 
wrist in attack on Fort Fisher, died a week later. 

Daniel Speed, enlisted Sept. i, 1864. 

Eben T. Achorn, enlisted Sept. 1, 1864. 

Aaron O. Winchenbach, enlisted Sept. i, 
1864, served on monitor Monadnock, engaged in 
both attacks on Fort Fisher, discharged June, 
1865. 

Henry F. Geel, enlisted Sept. i, 1864, served 
on Sabine, Ohio, and Restless, discharged June 
15, 1865. 

Benjamin Creamer, enlisted Sept. 9, 1864, 
discharged September, 1865. 

Eben F. Genthner, enlisted September, 1864, 
served on frigate Sabine, discharged June 20, 
1865. 

Uriah Lash, enlisted Nov. 4, 1861, in New 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 175 

York, served on U. S. S. G. W. Blunt on block- 
ade, discharged Dec. 14, 1864. 

Charles D. W. Smith, born in Germany, en- 
listed in New York, Dec. i, 1862, served on gun- 
boat Cairo on Mississippi, discharged Dec. i, 
1S63. 

Joseph Mathews, enlisted March 2, 1865, 
died in Havana. 

Thomas B. Hussey, enlisted in New York, 
May, 5, 1864, served on U. S. S. Rhode Island, 
discharged Aug. 18, 1865, died in Waldoboro, 
Oct. 13, 1909. 

William W. Havener, enlisted Feb. 21, 1862, 
served as landsman on U. S. Gunboat Katahdin 
in West Gulf Squadron, discharged May 14, 1865. 

Austin Keizer served in Navy also in Co. E, 
Coast Guards, died in Waldoboro, Nov. 13, 1901. 

Theodore S. Brown, enlisted Aug. 23, 1864, 
served on Frigate Sabine, discharged Aug. 22, 
1865, (of the seven sons of Charles S. Brown, 
six served in the civil war. Besides Theodore S., 
James N. served in Co. E, 2d Maine Cavalry, 
Newell W. as Engineer on military railroad, 
Arthur K. in Navy two years, John G. in Navy, 
died from effects of attempting to rescue sailors 
from a sinking monitor off Charleston, Edwin E., 
Co. B, 4th Maine, two years, wounded at Second 
Battle of Bull Run.) 



176 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Frederick Creamer, enlisted 1863, discharged 
1864. 

William J. Brown, enlisted Dec. 5, 1863, dis- 
charged, July 30, 1865, was on Hartford at battle 
of Mobile. 

Samuel Havener. 

Washington Havener. 

James G. Schwartz. 

Franklin Tarr. 



The census of 1870 showed that the popu- 
lation had begun to decrease, there being but 

4^174- 

In 1867 the question of building a railroad 
from Bath to Rockland began to be discussed and 
on the 26th of September of that year, at a special 
town meeting, it was voted that the town subscribe 
ten thousand dollars to the capital stock of the 
Knox & Lincoln Railroad Company, "providing 
said railroad shall pass above tide waters, and the 
depot in said town shall be located within three- 
fourths of a mile of the four corners of the road in 
the village." It was further voted at this time to 
loan the credit of the town to said corporation to 
the amount of seventy thousand dollars. Oct. i, 
1870, the town voted to loan its credit for an ad- 
ditional sum of twenty-six thousand, two hundred 
dollars. Jan. 28, 187 1, another loan was granted 
of thirty-five thousand, two hundred dollars. 



CIVIL WAR PERIOD. 177 

These loans were secured by mortgages on the 
property of the company. The town also voted a 
loan of fifteen thousand, two hundred dollars, for 
one year. The town subsequently gave its con- 
sent for the Directors of the Knox & Lincoln 
Railroad Company to locate its depot at the junc- 
tion with the highway leading from Waldoboro 
village to Jefferson, although more than three- 
fourths of a mile from the "four corners." The 
road went into operation in 1871. 

In March, 1872, a serious fire occurred on 
upper Main street. Originating in the old Cook 
store used as a paint shop, it spread to the large 
double house, occupied as a Congregational par- 
sonage, and by William Eugley, I hence to the 
dwelling of John P. Glidden, all of which were 
totally destroyed. This locality is now occupied 
by the dwellings of E. S. Crowell and Dr. M. L. 
Palmer. 

Soon after this fire, funds were raised by sub- 
scription and Capt. L. L. Kennedy was delegated 
to go to New York and purchase a fire engine. 
He succeeded in buying a Smith tub, which, un- 
der the name of Triumph, has done duty at many 
fires. A company was organized in 1875 ^'^^ 
uniformed. This company finally disbanded be- 
cause the villaore did not take sufficient interest 
in its aupport. 



178 HISTORY OF IVALDOBORO. 

The Lincoln County News was established in 
1873, being published the first year as a monthly 
paper. 



CHAPTER XVIII. 

CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. 

The one hundredth anniversary of the in- 
corporation of the town occuring in 1873, many 
citizens were favorable to having the occasion 
properly observed. Accordingly a public meet- 
ing was called and a committee was chosen to 
perfect arrangements for a Centennial Celebra- 
tion. As the date of incorporation, June 29th, 
came on Sunday, it was decided to have the cele- 
bration on July Fourth. The Committee of Gen- 
eral Management consisted of the following citi- 
zens: Andrew J. McLeod, Henry A. Kennedy, 
Henry Farrington, Edward R. Benner, Samuel L. 
Miller, Lowell P. Haskell, George Bliss. By the 
liberality of the principal citizens the financial 
success was assured. 

At sunrise the day was more appropriately 
announced by a national salute of thirty-seven 
guns, and soon the streets were filled by people 
in holiday attire, who arrived by every available 
conveyance. Special trains from east and west 
added largely to the multitude and it is probable 
that in addition to our own town's people no less 
than four thousand strangers were present. 



180 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

At an early hour national flags floated to the 
breeze from conspicuous points, the shipping dis- 
played their bunting, and many residences and 
places of business were beautifully decorated. 
With the exception of those places where the 
wants of the inner man were supplied, business 
was generally suspended. During the morning, 
marching of different organizations to places in 
the procession, the strains of martial music, the re- 
ception of companies from abroad, and the surg- 
ing crowd gave to quiet old VValdoboro an un- 
usual appearance of excitement. At 1 1 a. m. 
the procession was formed at Farrington's Corner, 
with the right resting on Main Street ; and at 1 2 
o'clock, the companies from abroad having in the 
meantime arrived, it moved down Main street in 
the following order:- 

Chief Marshal — John Richards. 
Aids, 
Henry Farrington, Daniel W. Demuth, 
C. D. Jones, T. F. Turner. 
Waldoboro Cornet Band. 
Company of soldiers in Continental uniform, 
numbering 40 muskets, Capt. S. L. Miller, act- 
ing as escort. 

Orator of the day in carriage. 

Municipal authorities. 

Aged citizens in carriages. 

A large boat drawn by four horses. This boat 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. 181 

contained thirty-eight young ladies, dressed 
in white and crowned with wreaths, repre- 
senting the Goddess of Liberty and the states, 
of the Union. The boat was beautifully 
decorated. From the mast depended fes- 
toons of evergreen, and on the sides were in- 
scribed, "Peace with all nations," and "God 
bless our homes." On the stern "Waldoboro 

Damariscotta Cornet Band. 
State of Maine Engine Co., of Thomaston. 
Eureka Engine Co., " 

Juvenile Engine Co., " 

Triumph Engine Co., Waldoboro. 
Boat, drawn by two horses, containing thirteea 
boys representing the Navy. This bqat bore 
the motto "Don't give up the ship!" 
Goshen Drum Corps. 
Woodbury Lodge, Good Templars.. 
Medomak " " 

Broad Bay 
N. Medomak " 
Company of mechanics, carrying the implements, 
of their trade. 

Trade Representations. 
Wagon of J. Clark & Son, a pyramid of ship 
models, surmounted by a miniature full riggedt 
ship. 



182 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Wagon representing the business of the Waldo- 

boro Suspender Company. 
Wagon of H. M. Folsom & Co. loaded with boxes 

of Blake's Bitters. 
A Sprague mowing machine, drawn by a span of 

black horses, representing the business of 

Richards & Storer. 

Sabbath Schools. 
Citizens and public generally. 

While the procession was moving a national 
salute was being fired at Frock's Ledge. Some 
idea of the extent of the procession may be formed 
from the fact that when the head had turned into 
Jefferson street the rear had not left Farrington's 
corner. As the column moved down Main street, 
which was lined with spectarors, the waving fiags 
and banners, the antique dress of the Continentals, 
the bright uniforms of the firemen and galy dec- 
orated carriages, presented a most pleasing spec- 
tacle. Just as the procession moved from Far- 
rington's corner, fire was discovered in the house 
of Newell Winslow, Esq., and, as it was located 
upon the route of the march, the head of the 
column was halted at the residence of John Sides, 
and the fire companies sent to the rescue. They 
arrived too late to save the building but did much 
toward subduing the fiames and preventing the 
destruction of Benjamin Genthner's residence 
and other adjacent buildings. At i -r^o p. m. the 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. 183 

firemen had become exhausted and the well 
dressed spectators could not be induced to re- 
live them for fear of soiling their "Sunday clothes." 
Accordingly, the Continentals were ordered to the 
"front," and at "double quick" went to the relief 
of the men at the brakes. At 2 p. m. the fire was 
completely under subjection and the procession 
was reformed and marched without any further 
interruption to the grove; where the invited 
guests, to the number of three hundred partook 
of a sumptuous collation, after which several 
hundred spectators were treated in the same 
manner. 

The assembly was called to order by Rev. A. 
J. McLeod, chairman of the committee of arrano-e- 
ments, and Rev. John Collins invoked the bless- 
ing of the Almighty on the occasion. 

The chairman, then, in an appropriate manner 
introduced Henry Farrington, Esq. as President. 

George Bliss was appointed Secretary and 
the following aged citizens Vice-Presidents : Fred- 
eric Castner (Waldoboro's oldest citizen), Jacob 
Shuman, Charles Hoffses, Jacob Burkett, John 
Hahn, Alfred Hovey, John Palmer, Henry Weav- 
er, Joseph Groton, John Bulfinch, Wm. White, 
Chas. Sweetland, John A. Haupt, Christopher 
Newbert and Corneilius Heyer. 

The exercises proceeded as follows : 

Music by Waldoboro Cornet Band. 



184 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Reading the act of Incorporation from the 
first record book of the town. 

The centennial hymn written for the occasion, 
was sung to the air of Old Hundred, with ac- 
companiment by the bands. It was as follows: 

CENTEiNNIAL HYMN. 

BY MRS. E. A. OAKES. 

Father of Love ! a hundred years 

Are as a day before thy sight ; 
To us how vast the time appears, 

How great the change attends their flight. 

A hundred years ! the watchful stars 

Kept vigil Th€7i o'er forest wild, 
Saw here the first rude homestead reared, 

And smiled upon the infant child. 

A century gone ! the swelling tide 

Of busy life its heartstrings thrills ; 
Now thriving town and happy homes 

Are cradled by the shelt'ring hills. 

A hundred years ! we reap the fruit, 
With greatful hearts we meet to-day ; 

'Neath grand old trees, whose whisp'ring leaves, 
Tell of our fathers passed away. 

Saviour of men ! be Thou our guide. 

Through changing scenes of life to come, 

And by thine all-sustaining power, 
Help us to crown what they begun. 

The President then announced the Orator of 
the day. Col. A. W. Bradbury, of Portland, who 
delivered an eloquent address. 



CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION. 1S5 

Col. Bradbury's most admirable oration occu- 
pied one hour, and we regret that we cannot pub- 
lush it entire. The exercises at the grove were con- 
cluded by the bands playing "America." The pro- 
cession then reformed and marched to Water street 
where it was disbanded. Frequent showers dur- 
ing the evening so interfered with the display of 
fireworks that only one-half the supply was used. 
The scene about the depot from 9 till 10 P. M. 
was a lively one. With the exception of the fire, 
the day passed off without disturbance of any 
kind, and it is a credit to Waldoboro that such an 
occasion was celebrated without the usual accom- 
paniment of drunkenness and rowdyism. 

An interesting feature of the meeting at the 
grove was the presence upon the stand of Mr. 
John Light of Nobleboro, a native of this town, 
one hundred and one years old — the only man 
present who was living when Waldoboro was in- 
corporated. 

Mr. Charles G. Chase, foreman of State of 
Maine Engine Co., was prostrated by work and 
heat at the fire and remained at the residence of 
Mr. J. A. Benner until Saturday, when he was re- 
moved to Thomaston. He was so far recovered 
as to be able to attend to his work at the prison. 

Edwin O. Clark was severely injured at the 
fire by the coupling of hose, which fell from the 
roof of Genthner's house. Mr. Winslow, whose 



186 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

house was burned, was leader of the VValdoboro 
Cornet Band, and two of his sons were with him, 
another son was in the ranks of the Continentals, 
and three of his daughters represented states in 
the boat. 

While the whole procession was in a state of 
confusion it was refreshing to see the firmness of 
the boys who manned the boat, and who Casabl- 
anca like, stuck to their motto — "Don't give up 
the ship!" 



CHAPTER XIX. 

CONCLUSION. 

A charter for a village corporation was ob- 
tained, but being- submitted to the voters at a 
meeting in Union hall, Jan. 26, 1874, it was voted, 
80 to 29, not to accept. 

The Congregational church was repaired 
in 1S74. 

In 1875, the reservoir was constructed near 
the Baptist church, the funds of the old reservoir 
society being used for that purpose. The same 
year the Baptist church was repaired and a new 
pipe organ installed. 

A change was made in Clark's building, 
resulting in the construction of a public hall. It 
was dedicated June 17, 1875, the drama "Don 
Ceesar de Bazen," being presented by a local 
company. 

A fire occurred in the Sproul block in 1875, 
which destroyed Isaacson's store and did other 
damage. 

Achorn's flour mill, which is now the electric 
light station, was completed in 1878. 

The census of 1880 showed the population 
to be 3,758. 



188 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

In iSSi, the question of a thread mill was 
agitated and steps taken to incorporate for that 
purpose, but the project did not materialize, the 
party who introduced the subject, locating else- 
where. 

Ambrose Hall died in October. 1881, from 
injuries received while at work in Fish's shipyard. 

E. Y. Perry of Hanover, Mass., became in- 
terested in the mill property at Winslow's I\Iills 
and in 18S4 built a fine mill which was operated 
by Vannah, Sweeney & Co. and later by \'annah. 
Chute & Co. 

In April. 1885, a corn canning company was 
organized with F. M. Eveleth as President, L. L. 
Kennedy, Charles Comery, Gorham Feyler, 
George L. Welt, Edwin O. Clark. Directors, S. 
L. Miller, Clerk, S. \V. Jackson, Treasurer. A 
lot was secured of Charles P. Willet. and a 
commodious factory erected and fitted with modern 
machinery' for canning corn. The enterprise was 
not a success and the property passed into other 
hands, finally owned and operated several years by 
the Twitchel-Champlin Company of Portland. 
The farmers not responding very liberally in plant- 
ins: corn, this firm tore the buildino- down and 
moved it to Green, Maine, where, it is said, the 
farmers planted no more corn than was secured in 
this vicinity. 

An iron bridge, the first of the kind in town. 



CONCLUSION. 189 

was constructed over the Medomak river at North 
Waldoboro, in 1885. In 1906 a metal bridge v/as 
placed across the river at head of tide and in 
1907 another was built at Bulfinch's. 

In June, 1885, Messrs Henry & Daniels of 
Boston, made a. proposition to operate a shoe 
factory here if the town would provide a factory. 
The proposition was accepted by the town and 
the event was celebrated by the people with 
illuminations, ringing bells, and firing a salute. 
The appropriations were limited to twenty thou- 
sand dollars. The Mathews lot near the river was 
selected by the Board of Trade and was accept- 
able to Henry & Daniels. The plans and speci- 
fications were furnished by them, R. \. Cary 
architect. The contract for the building was 
awarded to J. A. Greenleaf of Auburn. The cost 
when completed and fitted with engine, boilers, 
shafting, pulleys and belting, was $32,000. Mr. 
Henry of this firm, died before the completion of 
the factory, and it became necessary to make a 
new contract, which was done with \V. H. 
Daniels & Co. They operated the factory suc- 
cessfully, but having what they considered a 
better offer they suddenly left without any ex- 
planation. After being operated with poor suc- 
cess by two or three firms, the plant remained 
vacant till the spring of 1910, when it was sold to 
Duncan C. Rood of Roxbury, for five hundred 



190 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

dollars. Mr. Rood is now operating the factory 
with good prospects of success. 

The census of 1890 showed a population of 

3,505- 

April 22, 1892, the Sproul mills were burned 

together with Boyd's foundry and White's black- 
smith shop. The fire was supposed to have been 
of incendiary origin. 

At II o'clock on the evening of June 12, 
1893, fire was discovered in a small stable con- 
nected with the French building, occupied by J. 
K. VVillett. The fire spread quickly to the French 
buildingf and Medomak House stables, and the 
Medomak House and blacksmith shop below soon 
followed. The fire spread north, burning Orrin 
Achorn's house, the millinery shop and W. B. 
Groves' house. The Thomas Achorn house and 
J. P. Glidden's dwelling followed. A small shop 
near Union block was also burned. Help was 
called and a steam fire engine was sent from Bath. 
This was the most extensive fire since that of 

1854. 

In 1894, the Knox & Lincoln Railroad was 
sold. W^aldoboro held out and was the last to 
consent to the sale. The wisdom of the sale is 
now acknowledged. 

The war with Spain did not call many volun- 
teers from Waldoboro, but Merrill R. Head, 
Orchard Sidelinger, Ira Oliver and Frank Larra- 




UNION BLOCK 




RUINS OF UNION BLOCK 



CONCLUSION. 191 

bee were in the infantry at Chicamauga, and John 
W. Shuman, Willie Shuman, William T. Howell 
and Clinton Gross were in the navy. 

The census of 1900 gave the town a popu- 
lation of 3,145. 

June 5, 1900, fire was discovered in the attic 
of Union block and although the fire burned very 
slowly it was soon seen that the building was 
doomed to destruction. Help was summoned 
from Rockland and a steamer was sent from that 
city. A hand engine also came from Thomaston. 
This was the best building in town and its des- 
truction was a great loss to the place. Fortu- 
nately no other buildings were burned. 

This fire was followed June 15th by the burn- 
ing of Stephen A. Jones' sailloft. The last, if not 
the first, was evidently the work of an incendiary. 

The Waldoboro Electric Light & Water 
Company having acquired the Achorn mill and 
privilege, built over the dam. put in a new tur- 
bine water wheel and started the lights in the 
village, April 8, 1902. 

The Waldoboro Water Company was organ- 
ized Sept. 26. 1908, with the following officers: 
E. E. Jameson, President; M. VV. Levensaler, 
Secretary; John T. Gay, Jr., Treasurer, These 
officers with the addition of John B. Stahl, cons- 
tituted the board of directors. The company 
began operations at once, using the old shoe 



192 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

factory reservoir. The town surrendered its 
rights to the company which agreed to furnish 
the shoe factory with water without charge when 
the factory was running. This reservoir was very 
much enlarged and pipes laid in the streets. The 
suppi)- of water not appearing sufficent another 
source of supply is sought, which will probably 
be artesian wells. The hydrant system for which 
the town appropriated $500 annually for ten 
years, has been tested in two fires. Its utility 
was demonstrated in the Davis Hotel fire which 
occurred in May, 1909. 



CHAPTER XX. 

SHIPBUILDING. 

Such an important industry as shipbuilding 
has been to Waldoboro deserves a chapter. In 
the start we have been handicapped by finding no 
records in the Waldoboro Custom House previous 
to 187 1, and consequently have been obliged to 
seek information elsewhere. This makes our 
record somewhat imperfect. While we find no 
record back of 1829, it is certain many vessels, 
probably of small tonnage, were built here before 
that time. The first vessel of which we have any 
knowledge, was constructed at Schenck's Point. 
A Mr. Merritt of Broad Cove, was master work- 
man. James Hall came from Nobleboro to super- 
intend the launching. John Schenck was master 
of this vessel which was built in 18 10. While it 
is certain that Frederick Castner built vessels, we 
have no record of them and while Charles Miller 
built more than twenty-five we have only one re- 
corded. In 1843 ^ schooner was built in Jackson 
Russell's door-yard. It was thirty-three tons. 
William Russell and Ellis Wade furnished money 
and material. When completed she was hauled 
by forty yoke of oxen to Samson's landing. In 



194 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

the spring of 1844 she was rigged and launched. 

The ship Carohne & Mary Clark, built by 
Joseph Clark in 1849, ^'^^^ \^'\\}^ a series of mis- 
haps. While raising the stern the tackle broke, 
letting the stern fall, breaking it in several pieces ; 
the strapping broke in raising the bowsprit, letting 
that fall ; the shear broke in raising one of the 
masts, and when she was launched the ways 
spread. The accidents all occurred on Fridays. 
Finally she sailed on Thursday but adverse wind 
compelled her to postpone her departure to Fri- 
day when in attempting to sail through the "Nar- 
rows," she went on the rocks on the east side 
and punched a great hole in her bottom. Mr. 
Clark's insurance amply paid all expenses. Not- 
withstanding these accidents the ship nearly paid 
for herself on her first voyage. 

Some notable vessels have been built here. 
Mr. Clark built the first three-masted schooner 
and the Governor Ames built by Levitt Storer in 
1888, was the first five- master afloat. The six 
big five-masters built by George L. Welt for 
William F. Palmer of Boston, formed a fleet which 
had no equal. Joseph Clark, Isaac Reed, Augus- 
tus Welt, William and Alfred Storer, Henry Ken- 
nedy, Charles Miller, Edwin Achorn, Samuel Nash 
and William Fish were notable builders in their 
day. Since 1904, when the Harwood Palmer was 
launched, no shipbuilding has been done and the 



SHIPBUILDING. 195 



business will soon be a lost art in Waldoboro. 

The follow 

obtainable 



The following tables show the record so far as 



190 



HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 



Year 


Builder 


Rig 


I'on- 
nage 


Name 


1829 


Unknown 


schr 


93 


Hampton 


1830 


" 


schr 




Billow 


1830 


" 


schr 


69 


Albert 


1 83 1 


" 


schr 


135 


Vesta 


1831 


" 


schr 




Atlantic 


'833 


John Kalcr, Jr. 


schr 


"3 


Firm 


1833 


Samuel Nash 


schr 


112 


Jane 


1833 


Reuben Miller & Co. 








1833 


W. & J. R. Groton 








1834 


William Mathews 


brig 


229 


Hockomock 


'834 


B. & J. Eugley 








1834 


Samuel Nash 


schr 




Sarah Nash 


1834 


John Kakr, Jr., 








1835 


Unknown 


schr 


92 


Orion 


1835 


Joseph Clark 


ship 




Mary Ann* 


1835 


Kaler & Burkett 


brig 




Benjamin 


1835 


William Mathews 


bark 




William James 


1835 


" 


brig 


146 


Mentor 


1835 


John Lash 


brig 


160 


Oswego 


1836 


Jacob Eugley 


schr 


114 


Groton 


1836 


Joseph Clark 


ship 




Caroline Clark 


1836 


John Kaler, Jr. 


schr 


"3 


Medomak 


1836 


Edward Benner 


schr 


67 


Yankee 


1836 


Samuel Nash 


schr 


118 


James 


T836 


Kaler & Burkett 


lirig 


118 


Tom Paine 


1836 


J. & R. Miller 








1836 


Edwin Achorn & Co. 








1836 


James Cook 


schr 


160 


Boston 


1836 


Charles Miller 


brig 


196 


Moroscof 


1836 


Edwin Achorn 


schr 


125 


St. George 



*The tirst full rigged ship built in Waldoboro. 
frhis was Charles Miller's twenty-fourth vessel. 



SHIPBUILDING. 



vn 



Year 


Builder 


T, • lon- 
Rig 

*" nage 


Name 


1837 


^enry Kennedy « 


chr 


Columbia 


1837 


[ohn Lash i 


chr 


77 J 


ane Fish 


1837 


Reed, Haskell & Co. 1 


jark 






1837 


J. & R. Miller 


,chr 


116 ; 


Surplus 


1837 


Joseph Clark 


ihip 


480 Avon 


1837 


William Mathews 


Kig 




"eylon 


1837 


Christian Schwier 








1837 


Benner & Schwartz 


schr 






1838 


George Sproul 


schr 


132 


Peru 


1838 


Frederick Castner 


schr 


135 


Lodi 


183S 


Henry Kennedy 


schr 




Moscow 


1838 


J. R. Groton 


schr 


150 


St. Lawrence 


183S 


James Cook 


brig 


200 


Antares 


1838 


Unknown 


schr 




McDonough 


183S 


Shuman & Welt 


brig 






1838 


Unknown 


schr 


87 


Watchman 


1839 


J. & R. Miller 


bark 


304 


Ten Brothers 


1839 


Samuel Nash 


schr 


130 


Edward Kent 


1839 


William & Alfred Storev 


ship 


543 


St. Andrew 


1839 


George Kaler, 3d 


ship 


388 


Massachusetts 


1839 


Jose})h Clark 


ship 




Mallabar 


1839 


Unknown 


bark 


345 


Antoleon 


1839 


Samuel Nash 


schr 


130 


VanBuren 


1839 


John Lash 


schr 


92 


Mary Catherine 


1839 


Achorn, Reed & Haskell 


ship 






184c 


John Achorn & Co. 


bark 






184c 


Shuman & Welt 


ship 




Gibralter 


184c 


) Shuman & Welt 


schr 


33 


Hudson Hewett 


184c 


) Benjamin L. Harriman 


brig 






184c 


) Joseph Miller 


bark 




Em* 



*When Mr. Wildes was painting the name Emily on the stern the 
builder appeared and inquired how much it cost a letter to put on the 
aame. On being told he said : "You need not put on any more," and 
■so the name remained "Em." 



l!)cS 



HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 



Year 


Builder 


Rig 


Ton- 
nage 


Name 


1840 


George Kaler 


schr 




Redondo 


1840 


John Lash 


schr 


140 


Layfaette 


1841 


J. >S; R. Miller 


brig 


260 


Washington 


1 841 


Unknown 


schr 


97 


r)live Elizabeth 


1 841 


Achorn, Haskell iV Reed 


hark 


276 


Toulon 


1841 


Joseph Clark 


ship 


62s 


Desdemona 


1 841 


Kennedy iN: Welt 


brig 


279 


Toronto 


1841 


Samuel Nash 


brig 


250 


Ohio 


1 841 


(jeorge Kaler, 3d 


bark 


300 


George Henry 


1841 


Benjamin L. Harriman 


schr 




Waldoboro 


i«4i 


" 


bark 


309 


.A.vola 


1 841 


John Kaler 


schr 






1843 


Welt, Reed & Co. 


schr 




Orland 


1843 


John Lash 


bark 






1843 


George Kaler, 3d 


schr 


133 


Romeo 


1843 


Wm. & Alfred Storer 


ship 




Herman Hunroy 


1843 


George Sproul 


brig 




Braganza 


1844 


" 


brig 




Torcello 


1844 


Samuel Nash 


schr 






1844 


Benjamin L. Harriman 


brig 






1844 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


schr 




Pedemonte 


1844 


Wm. ^;. Alfred Storer 


ship 




Carolus 


1845 


Unknown 


schr 




Ontario 


184s 


Samuel Nash 


schr 






1845 


George Kaler 


schr 


170 


Richmond 


1845 


J. R. Groton 


schr 






1845 


Genthner & Morse 


brig 




Jesso 


1846 


Welt, Reed & Co. 


schr 




Oceola 


1846 


" 


schr 




Sarah Ann 


1846 


Henry Kennedy 


schr 




Mary W. Chappell 


1846 


J. R. Groton 


schr 






1846 


Henry Kennedy 


brig 




Lane 



SHIFBUILDIXG. 



199 



Year 


Builder 


Rig 


Ton- 
nage 


Name 


1846 


Welt, Reed & Co. 


brig 






1846 


J. R. Groton 


brig 






1846 


Samuel Nash 


brig 


259 


Susannah 


1846 


J. & R. Miller 


brig 






1846 


Genthner & Morse 


brig 






1846 


" 


schr 


97 


Romeo 


1846 


Welt, Reed & Co. 


schr 




Redington 


1846 


Unknown 


brig 


175 


Matamoras 


1846 


Samuel Nash 


schr 


127 


Algoma 


1847 


" " 


schr 


149 


Albano 


1847 


Edwin Achorn 


bark 




Mary Ellen 


1847 


Welt & Co. 


bark 




Pedemonte 


1847 


George Kaler 


brig 




Cymbrus 


1847 


J. R. Groton 


schr 


149 


Mary Groton 


1847 


J. R. Groton 


schr 






1847 


Unknown 


schr 


131 


Luella 


1847 


" 


schr 




Times 


1847 


" 


schr 


129 


Allegan 


1847 


Thomas Gay 


schr 


136 


Montrose 


1848 


John A. Benner & Co. 


ship 






1848 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


schr 




Albion 


1848 


J. R. Groton 


schr 




S. Gardner 


1848 


Vannah & Hall 


schr 


138 


Canary 


1848 


Unknown 


schr 


126 


Pushavv 


1848 


" 


schr 


HS 


Waterloo 


1848 


B. L. Harriman 


bark 




Adams 


1848 


Solomon Mink tS; R. Orff 


schr 






1848 


Thomas Gay 


schr 


100 


Lunker Sue 


184S 


Samuel Nash 


brig 


134 


Samuel Nash 


1848 


Welt & Co. 


schr 


149 


S. D. Hart 


1848 


M. M. Rawson 


bark 




Drummond 


1848 


Robert Miller 


brig 







SHIPB UILDING. 



200 



Year 


Builder 


Rig 


Ton- 
nage 


Name 


1848 


J. K. Gruton 


ship 






1849 


Ilarriman iS; Comery 


bark 




Antelope 


1849 


William Achorn & Co. 


schr 






1849 


\Vm. Welt & Co. 


schr 




Orlando 


1849 


Jacob Hahn & Co. 


schr 


157 


Tortola 


1849 


J. R. Groton 


bark 




Nineveh* 


1849 


Joseph Clark 


ship 


800 


Caroline >.\: Mary Clark 


1S49 


Edwin Achorn 


schr 


140 


Mohawk 


1849 


Stahl & Co. (^ Dutch Neck) 


schr 


134 


Hudson 


1849 


Thomas t\: Wm. Achorn 


brig 


1 48 


Susan Ludwig 


1849 


Unknown 


schr 


144 


Robert Miller 


1849 


Charles Vannah & Co. 


brig 


163 


Angola 


1849 


George Sproul 


brig 


174 


Markland 


1849 


Kennedy lV Hall 


schr 


139 


Martha Hall 


1849 


J. R. Groton 


schr 




St. Marie 


1849 


Edwin Achorn & Co. 


schr 


77 


Denmark 


1849 


S. Nash & R. Miller 


schr 


77 


Denmark 


1849 


Wm. Achorn & Co. 


schr 






1850 


Unknown 


schr 


132 


Lebanah 


1S50 


George Sproul 


brig 




Zyder Zee 


1850 


Samuel Nash & Co. 


bark 






1850 


Edwin Achorn & Co. 


bark 




Emblem 


1850 


M. M. Rawson 


ship 




Eastern Queen 


1850 Reed, Welt & Co. 


ship 


699 


Muscongus 


1850 Unknown 


brig 




New World 


1850 Thomas Gay 


bark 




Brunette 


1 850J Frederick Creamer 


schr 




Illuminator 


l850!Unknown 


schr 


99 


Catherine Beale 


i850|nenry Kennedy 


ship 


449 


Oregon 


i850|John A. Levensaler 


schr 


82 


Orbit 



♦This bark was rigged and yards crossed without ballast. When fully 
rigged she capsized. 



SHIPBUILDING. 



201 



Year 


Builder 


Rig , 
chr 


I'on- 
lage 

106 


Name 




1850^ 


Stahl & Co. s 


Vlariel 




1850. 


oseph Clark t 


hip 


George Evans 




185, 


lenry Kennedy s 


chr 


103 


lenry .\. 




1851 < 


Charles Vannah 


Drig 








1851 


i. R. Groton 


brig 








1851 


rhomas Gay 


;chr 


197 


3ucentaur 




1851 


Edwin Achorn 


)ark 


299 


Mary Ellen 




1851 


B. L. Ilarriman 


ship 


700 


B. L. Harriman 




1851 


J. R. Kennedy 


brig 


199 


Three Sisters 




1851 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


brig 




Edward 




1851 


Young, Kennedy & Co. 


ship 


563 


New England 




1851 


J. R. Groton 


brig 








1851 


Henry Kennedy 


brig 


195 


Lucy Ann 




1851 


Schwartz & Castner 


brig 


231 


Julia Ann 




1851 


Henry Kennedy 


ship 




Toulion 




1852 


Charles Vannah 


brig 








1852 


Samuel Nash 


brig 




Peerless 




1852 


B. L. Harriman 


bark 


576 






1852 


Hovey, Reed & Co. 


ship 




Edward Stanley 




1852 


Edwin Achorn 


ship 


744 


Woodcock 




1852 


Unknown 


schr 


183 


D. B. Barnard 




1852 


" 


schr 


138 


Lucinda Jane 




1852 


Henry Kennedy 


schr 


no 


Alabama 




1852 


Aaron Kaler 


ship 








1853 


Joseph Clark 


ship 




Ella A. Clark 




1853 


Charles Vannah & Co. 


schr 








1853 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


schr 




Moro 




1853 


Aaron Kaler 


bark 




Seabreeze 




1852 


Thomas Achorn 


brig 


247 


Thomas Achorn 




185: 


Wm. Welt & Co. 


brig 








185; 


5 Edwin Achorn & Co. 


ship 




Wings of the Morning 




185. 


5 Unknown 


schr 


143 


George Millard 


, 



202 



HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 



Year 


Builder 


Rig 


Ton- 
nage 


Name 


'853 


Henry Kennedy 


bark 




Amazon 


1854 


Unknown 


brig 




Henry 


1854 


Charles Vannah 


bark 






1854 


Rufus Achorn 


sco^v 




Rough cS: Ready 


1854 


Stahl & Co. 


brig 


249 


Triad elin 


»854 


Thomas Achorn & Co. 


brig 




Amanda Jane 


1854 


Thomas Genthner 


brig 






1854 


Hovey, Reed & Co. 


brig 




E. Drummond 


1854 


B. B. Haskell & Co. 


ship 


1300 


E. Wilder Farley 


1854 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


ship 




Ocean Belle* 


1854 


Edwin Achorn & Co. 


ship 




Achornf 


i8s4 


Charles Vannah 


ship 


806 


Moonlight 


1854 


Joseph Clark 


brig 




Edwin 


1854 


Schwartz & Castner 


brig 




D. 0. Castner 


1854 


Alfred Storer & Jas. Hovey 


ship 


1200 


.Alfred Storer 


'855 


" 


ship 




James Hovey 


1855 


Aaron Kaler 


bark 




George Allen 


1855 


Geo. \V. Caldwell & Co. 


brig 


169 


Leviathan 


.855 


Samuel Nash 


brig 


270 


Ocean Wave 


1855 


J. R. Kennedy 


brig 


202 


Two Boys 


'855 


George D. Smouse & Co. 


brig 




Eliza Ann 


1855 


Young, Roberts & Co. 


brig 


197 


Susan Emil y 


1855 


Samuel Nash 


brig 






1855 


Thonic.s Achorn & Co. 


bark 




San ford 


1855 


B. L. Harriman 


bark 




M. B. Harriman 


1855 


Henry Kennedy 


brig 


231 


Almore 


1856 


Smouse & Welt 


schr 


145 


\Vm. Jones 


1856 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


schr 


199 


Damon 


1856 


Storer & Comery 


ship 


1700 


William F. Storer 


1856 


Joseph Clark 


ship 


1308 


Joseph Clark 



* Samuel Waltz vi'as killed on this Ship. 
fThis ship was burned at Muscongus. 



SHIPBUILDING. 



203 



Year Builder 


Rig 


Ton 
nagt 


Name 


1S56 Henry Kennedy 


schr 




Canary 


1857 Alfred Storer 


brig 


300 


Ambrose Light 


185; 


7 Kennedy & Hall 


brig 


346 


Fannie Lincoln 


185; 


Mclntyre, Caldwell & Co. 


brig 


338 


Annie D. Jordan 


185s 


Charles Comeiy 


schr 




Charles Comcry 


1859 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


ship 




Village Belle 


1859 


Joseph Clark 


ship 


1308 


J. Webster Clark 


1S59 


Schwartz & Cashier 


brig 




Ida C. Coniery 


i860 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


schr 


1S5 


Sedona 


1S60 


" 


ship 


I171 


Weston Merritt 


i860 


William Fish 


schr 


194 


Joseph W. Fish 


i860 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


schr 


'55 


G. W. Rawley 


1 861 


" 


schr 






1861 


William Fish 


schr 


272 


Samuel Fish 


1861 


" 


schr 


197 


Union Flag 


1862 


Storer & Caldwell 


brig 


396 


John H. Kennedy 


1S62 


William Fish 


schr 






1862 


Joseph Clark 


ship 


1240 


Otis Norcross 


1862 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


schr 


177 


White Sea 


1863 


William F. Storer 


schr 




S. H. Jackson 


1863 


William Fish 


schr 






1863 


George W. Caldv\ell 


schr 




William Flint 


1863 


Joseph Clark 


ship 




Edwin Clark 


1863 


Henry Kennedy 


brig 




Sarah E. Kennedy 


1864 


" 


brig 




Edwin H. Kennedy 


1864 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


ship 




Sarah C. Welt 


1864 


William Fish 


schr 


234 


Charlotte Fish 


1864 


Welt, Feyler & Reed 


schr 


253 


Charles W. Holt 


1864 


George W. Caldwell & Co. 


5chr 




fosiah Whitehouse 


1864 


Henry Kennedy & Son 


orig 






1864 


foseph Clark 


lark 




Celeste Clark 


1864 


Schwartz & Castner 1 


3rig 


472 . 


ohn Hastings 



204 



HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 



Year 


Builder 


Rig 


Ton- 
nage 


Name 


1865 


William Fish 


schr 




Fanny K. Shaw 


1865 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


jark 




Joseph A. Davis 


1865 


Benner & Reed 


schr 




Rising Sun 


1865 


" 


schr 




Grace Clifton 


1865 


Alfred Storer 


schr 


264 


J. B. Marshall 


1865 


Wilbur Newhall 


bark 


575 


Chimborazo 


1865 


Joseph Clark 


schr 




.American Eagle* 


1865 


Alfred Storer 


schr 






1865 


William F. Storer 


schr 


310 


Hattie B. 


1865 


Charles Comery & Co. 


hark 


458 


Reunion 


1865 


Unknown 




244 


Irene E. Meservey 


1866 


Joseph Clark 


bark 




William Brown 


1866 


William F. Storer 


brig 


348 


Mary C. Comery 


1866 Reed, Welt & Co. 

\ 


schr 


255 


Jesse Hart 


1866 


William Fish 


schr 


222 




1866 


Welt, Reed & Feyler 


schr 


272 


Mary W. H upper 


1866 


Alfred Storer 


schr 


264 


Daniel Pierson 


1866 


William Fish 


schr 


239 


Frederick Fish 


1866 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


schr 


154 


Starlight 


1866 


George W. Caldwell & Co. 


schr 




Alice G. Grace 


1866 


John W. Welt & Co. 


schr 




Laura Bridgeman 


1866 


" 


schr 






1867 


Alfred Storer 


schr 


266 


Maggie Mulvey 


1867 


Joseph Clark 


ship 


1258 


Gold Hunter 


1867 


Geo. W. Caldwell .S: Co. 


brig 




Catawba 


1867 


William Fish 


schr 


68 


Agnes 1. Grace 


1867 


" 


schr 


165 


Wm. Penn 


1867 


Henry Kennedy 


bark 


248 


Elodia A. Kennedy 


1867 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


bark 


566 


Mary G. Reed 


1867 


A. R. Reed & Co. 


bark 


611 


Rosetta McNiel 


1867 


Alfred Storer 


schr 


III 


Nellie Belle 




''First three masted schooner 


ever 1 


3uih. 





SHIPBUILDING. 



205 



Year 


Builder 


Rig 


Ton- 
nage 


Name 




1868 


Caldwell, Flanders & Co. 


schr 




Onieda 




1868 


Henry Kennedy & Co. 


schr 


234 


Zeta Psi 




1868 


Alfred Storer 


schr 


237 


Oriol 




1868 


William Fish 


schr 








1868 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


ship 


1496 


.A.nnie Fish 




1868 


Joseph Clark 


brig 


233 


I. Howland 




1869 


Unknown 


brig 


316 


Loretta Fish 




1869 


Reed, Caldwell & Co. 


ship 


1122 


Alex. McNeil 




1869 


V/illiam Fish 


schr 


227 


Joseph Fish 




1869 


Storer & Benner 


brig 


492 


Annie R. Storer 




1870 


Joseph Clark 


brig 


336 


Joseph Clark 




1871 


Charles Comery et als 


schr 


116 


General Hall 




1871 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


schr 


210 


Samuel Hart 




1871 


Edwin Achorn 


schr 


138 


James Wall 




1871 


Alfred Storer 


schr 


339 


Edward R. Emerson 




1871 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


schr 


225 


Stephen G. Hart 




1S72 


Boyd S. Creamer 


schr 


12 


Glendale 




1872 


Reed, Caldwell & Co. 


schr 


137 


Nathan A. P'arwell 




1872 


Joseph Clark & Son 


bark 


782 


Nina Sheldon 




1872 


Edwin Achorn & Son 


schr 


175 


Georgia D. Loud 




1872 


Reed, Welt & Co. 


schr 


280 


Clara G. Loud 




1873 


Joseph Clark & Son. 


bktn 


484 


Mignon 




1873 


WilHam Fish 


schr 


376 


Agnes L Grace 




1873 


Alfred Storer 


schr 


476 


Lula 




1S73 


George W. Caldwell & Co. 


schr 


250 


Lena R. Storer 




•873 


Edwin Achorn & -Son 


schr 


279 


Tanhauser 




1873 


Joseph Clark & Son 


brig 


424 


Emily T. Sheldon 




1873 


Kennedy & Comery 


schr 


449 


Ella M. Storer 




'873 


A. R. Reed & Co. 


bark 


873 


Alice Reed 




1873 


A. Storer & Son 


schr 


498 


John Proctor 




1874 


" 


schr 


377 


George E. Young 




1874 


Edwin Achorn & Son 


schr 


87 


.Achorn 





yv 



206 



HISTORY OF WALDO BORO. 



Year 



Builder 



Rig 



Ton-i 
nagei 



Name 



8741 George W. Caldwell iSc Co. 

S74J Joseph Clark & Son 

874; Reed, Welt A: Co. 

874 

874 



A. R. Reed & Co. 
H. Kennedv & Co. 



H. Kennedy & Co. 
William Fish 
874'joseph Clark A: Son 

875 

875 

875 !Wm. F. Storer 

875 A. R. Reed & Co. 

876 Reed, Welt & Co. 

877 A. R. Reed & Co. 
877 A. Storer & Son 
87 7 1 Edwin O. Qark 
87S:H. Kennedy A: Co. 

879 Edwin O. Clark 
S79 -A. Storer iS: Son 
879' Welt, Caldwell A: Co. 

880 A. Storer A: Son 

880 H. Kennedy A: Co. 
SSo A. R. Reed cV Co. 
88 r Augustus Welt & Co. 

881 A. Storer Ov; Son 
SSi William Fish 

882 H. Kennedy Oc Co. 
882 A. Storer c>;: Son 

882 Edu-in O. Clark 
882 !H. Kennedy & Co. 
S82 William Fish 

883 Edwin O. Clark 
883 Carter &. Lilly 
88^ 'H. Kennedv & Co. 



>schr 

bktn 

ship 

schr 

bktn 

ship 

schr 

bktn 

schr 

ship 

bark 

ship 

bktn 

ship 

bark 

brig 

schr 

ibktn 
i 
I schr 

bark 

ship 

schr 

schr 

[schr 

schr 

schr 

schr 

schr 

schr 

schr 

sip 

schr 



246 
59S 
1435 



W^innie LawTV 
Josephine 
iRosie Welt 



1550 
747 
1449 
604 
1661 
758 

373 
586 
620 

634 
711 

1564 
425 

744 



435 Mary J. Cook 
469 jFred Eugene 
I326iCarrie Clark 
395 John W. Welt 
448 Florence L. Genov-ar 
315 Theresa A. Keene 

Isaac Reed 

Annie Reed 

WiUie Reed 

Ralph M. Haj-ward 

Mabel Clark 

Fannie L. Kennedy 

Stacy Clark 

Isaac T. Campbell 

Stephen G. Hart 

Frank Harrington 

Matanzas 

Emily Reed 

Fannie L. Child 

Woodward Abrahams 



404 
443 



450 Jennie L. Hall 
John H. Cross 
George H. Ames 

496 iNantasket 

428 Annie B. Hoffses 

474 (Stephen G. Loud 



404 

9 
407 



Evie B. HaU 

Bessie 

Ida Frances 



SHIPBUILDING. 



207 



Year 


Bulider 


Rig 


fon- 
nage 


Name 


1883 


\ugustus Welt & Co. 


schr 


488 


Maggie G. Hart 


1883 


A. Storer & Son 


schr 


550 


Joshia Baker 


1883 


Edwin 0. Clark 


bktn 


65s 


E. 0. Clark 


1883 


H. Kennedy & Co. 


iktn 


639 


Rachel Emery 


1883 


William Fish 


schr 


504 


S. G. Hart 


1884 


A. R. Reed 


ship 


1745 


George Curtis 


1885 


A Storer & Son 


schr 


756 


J. Manchester Haynes 


1885 


A. R. Reed 


schr 


645 


Maggie G. Hart 


1885 


Thomas Creamer 


sip 


9 


John W. Caswell 


1886 


George L. Welt & Co. 


schr 


852 


Josiah Hart 


1888 


Levitt Stoier 


schr 


1689 


Governor Ames* 


1889 


Welt & Co. 


schr 


1 162 


.Augustus Welt 


1890 


Thomas F. Creamer 


sip 


8 


No name 


1890 


Levitt Storer 


schr 


1064 


James W. Fitch 


1891 


Thomas F. Creamer 


sip 


8 


Jennie Mauri 


1891 


Reed & Co. 


schr 


1220 


Hattie P. Simpson 


1892 


A. R. Reed & Co. 


schr 


777 


Ida C. Southard 


1892 


Thomas F. Creamer 


sip 


9 


Gracie 


1892 


A. R. Reed & Co. 


schr 


750 


Madaline Cooney 


1893 


Thomas F. Creamer 


sip 


8 


City of Everett 


1894 


" 


sip 


5 


Ethel 


1S96 


" 


schr 


13 


Margurite 


1897 


" 


schr 


13 


Olive Mary 


1898 


Charles E. Carter 


sip 


7 


.■\u Revoir 


1899 


Thomas F. Creamer 


sip 


10 


Geraldine 


1900 


C. Winchenbach 


sip 


6 


Clyde & Astor 


1900 


George L. Welt 


schr 


2075 


Fannie Palmer 


1900 


Thomas F. Creamer 


schr 


14 


Eliza A. Benner 


1901 


C. Winchenbach 


sip 


7 


Minnie 


1901 


George L. Welt 


schr 


2240 


Baker Palmer 


1902 


» 


schr 


1763 


Paul Palmer 


1903 


" 


schr 


'12315 


Dorothy Palmer 


1904 


" 


schr 


,2357 


Singleton Palmer 


1904 


" " 


schr 


J240C 


Harwood Palmer 



*First tive masted schooner built. 



/' 



CHAPTER XXI. 

THE OLD GERMAN MEETING HOUSE. 

While the preservation of this venerable relic 
of early days in Waldoboro. is commendable, it is 
to be regretted that we cannot refer to any written 
record, secular or ecclesiastical, to show the exact 
date of its erection. We know that the old church 
was in existence in 1773 because when the first 
town meeting was called that year, by virtue of 
an act of the General Court of Massachusetts, 
the place designated in the warrant for holding 
the meeting was "at the westerly meeting house," 
indicating clearly enough that there were two 
"meeting" houses in the township at that time. 

The old log meeting house at "Meeting 
House Cove," dedicated in 1763, had become too 
small and inconvenient for the accommodation of 
the worshippers and a few years later (about 
1770) steps were taken to erect a larger and more 
imposing house. A lot of land was donated by 
Christopher Newbert, who then owned the farm 
now known as the Gorham Castner place, and 
the building was erected thereon near the eastern 
bank of the river. This location was near the 
point in the river where travelers passing east and 



GERMAN MEETING HOUSE. 209 

west were ferried across previous to the building 
of bridges above, and the ferry probably influenced 
the location. Here the building was erected but 
not completed. It had no windows and the only 
seats were rude benches. Services could only be 
held in the summer. There was a grave yard at 
the same place. The people were poor and about 
that time (1772) some fifteen families took their 
departure for North Carolina. Years went by 
and finally efforts were made to complete the 
house of worship. But in the meantime adverse 
claims to land titles on the western side of the 
river had been settled. Deeds to lands on that 
side had been renewed and the settlement in- 
cluded the lots assigned for the use of church and 
schools. Waldo never gave any deeds of the lots 
promised for similar purposes on the eastern side. 
This probably was the chief inducement for 
our forefathers to remove the building to another 
locality before completing the work. The lot 
reserved for church purposes was nearly opposite 
and it is probable that it began to be used for a 
grave yard before the church was moved. There 
was opposition to this course but finally all con- 
sented except Major Razor, and after the frame 
was taken down it is said he hauled away some of 
the timber in the night time. Dr. John Christo- 
pher Walleazer, who had been most instrumental 
in securing the removal, had charge of the work. 



210 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

It was not till 1804. however, that the society 
voted to pay his claim in full for his services ren- 
dered in the rebuilding. 

This removal took place during the winter of 
1795. The last town meeting was held there on 
the east side in 1 794 and the map in Boston ex- 
ecuted in 1795 shows the meeting house on the 
west side. 

Christopher Newbert, who donated the land 
for the first location, came from Germany in 1748 
with his wife and four children. He was a man 
of some influence among the people and when the 
town was incorporated he was chosen one of the 
first board of Selectmen. 

The old church is 36x45 feet with a large 
porch at the entrance, and the walls are about 20 
feet hieh. The sills, which have been partially 
renewed, were originally 12x13 inches white pme, 
and the old cross fioor timbers which remain are 
the same size, white pine and black ash, sound as 
a nut. A gallery runs around three sides and the 
supporting beams are about 10 inches square. 
The front of the gallery and the pulpit are painted, 
but the pews, which are four feet square with 
seats on three sides, never were painted. The 
desk of the pulpit upon which rests the holy bible, 
is nine feet from the fioor. The communion 
table and contribution boxes are homemade and 
antique affairs. 



GERMAN MEE TING II O USE. 2 1 1 

Several years ago interested parties began 
the collection of old German books and other 
articles which now attract attention in the meeting 
house. On the front of the pulpit are the por- 
traits of Rev. and Mrs. John Wm. Starman and 
on one side is a very ancient looking tablet taken 
from the old grave yard at Meeting House Cove. 
The inscription on this old stone is as follows: 
"Hier light begraben 
Herr John Mertin Grosz 
und ist geboren den i Februar an 1679 und 
ist gestorben den 1 1 Februar 
1768 in 90 Tahr." 

The transulation is as follows: "Here lies 
buried Mr. John Martin Gross and is born the i 
February, 1679 and has died the 11 February, 
1768, in (his) 90 year." 

A cabinet contains a growing collection of 
old German bibles and other books and the origi- 
nal communion service used in the celebration of 
the Lord's Supper. 

The antique stove with its funnel passing out 
through a window, was purchased in 18 14. The 
building has no chimney. 

Some years ago Mrs. Ella A. Oakes of Wal- 
doboro, composed the following lines which were 
copied by Ward Adams and found a place in the 
old church : 



312 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

The Old German Church. 
Thou art crumbling to the dust, old pile, 

Thou art hastening to the fall ; 
And over thee, in thy loneliness, 

Grows the lichens on the wall. 
The worshippers are scattered now, 

Who knelt before thy shrine, 
And silence reigns where anthems rose. 

In the days of "Auld Lang Syne." 

And sadly sighs the wandering wind 

Where oft in years gone by, 
Prayers rose from many hearts to Him, 

The Highest of the High. 
The tramp of many a busy foot 

That sought the aisles, is o'er, 
.'\nd many a weary heart around, 

Is still for ever more. 

How doth ambition's hope take wings. 

How droops the spirit now? 
We hear the distant city's din, 

The dead are mute below ; 
The sun that shone upon their paths 

Now gilds their lonely graves, 
The zephyrs which once fanned their brows 

The grass above them waves. 

O ! could we call the many back 

Who've gathered here in vain — 
Who've careless roved where we do now, 

Who'll never meet again ! 
How should our very hearts be stirred 

To meet the earliest gaze 
Of the lovely and the beautiful — 

The lights of other days. 



GERMAN MEETING HOUSE. 2i:i' 

The register upon the table in front of the 
pulpit is becoming an interesting record of visitors, 
who have been attracted to this venerable relic 
of Waldoboro. All visitors are requested to add 
their names. 

The German Protestant Society was organ- 
ized April 3, 1800, under an act of the General 
Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
entitled "An Act to incorporate a Religious So- 
ciety in the Town of Waldoborough." The in- 
corporators named were Jacob Ludwig, Peter 
Crammer, Jacob Winchenbach, Joseph Ludwig, 
John G. Borneman, William Kaler, Charles Kaler, 
John Christopher Walleazer, Peter Gross, Andrew 
Hofses, Andon Hofses, Christopher Woltsgruber, 
John Miller, Conrad Heyer, Charles Oberlack, 
Jacob Kaler, Henry Stahl, John Stahl. Mathias 
Hofses, George Hofses, Charles Walch, George 
Heibner, Charles Heibner, Frank Miller, Charles 
Miller, Conrad Gross, Christian Storer, Charles 
Storer, John Winchenbach, Jr., Andrew Woltz, 
Daniel Woltz, Andrew Genthner, Conrad Seyder, 
John Cramer, Daniel Filhouer, Jacob Cramer, 
Frederick Kensel, George Clouse, John Benner, 
Paul Kuhn, John Kensel, Daniel Eichhorn, John 
Weaver, Assamus Lash, George Dahlheim, Philip 
Newbert, George Eichhorn, John Orff, Frederick 
Orff, Michael Hoch, John Light, George Hoch, 
Jacob Schwartz, John Martin, Philip Schuman,, 



214 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Joseph Oberlack, Christopher Crammer, Catharina 
Schuman, George Schuman, Henry Oberlack, 
Jacob Ludvvig, Jr., Jacob Kaler, Andrew Wagner, 
Jacob Crammer, Cydonia Welt, Peter Schwartz, 
Frank Miller, Jr., John Schnowdeal, John Borck- 
hard, Peter Schnowdeal, Henry W^inchenbach, 
Jacob Genthner, Godfrey Hofses, Christopher 
Newbert, Paul Lash, Philip Mink, Christian 
Hofses, George Woltzgruber, John Winchenbach, 
Henry W^alch, Jr., John Walch, Jr., John Weaver, 
Cornelius Bornheimer, Valentine Mink, Martin 
Benner, Paul Mink, Mathias Hebner, Mathias 
Woltz, Peter Mink, Charles Mink, Francis Keizer, 
Frank Oberlack, Joseph H. Ludwig and Jacob 
Winchenbach, Jr. I have followed the spelling 
which shows in many cases what the original 
German names were. 

The Society was empowered to hold the 
several tracts and parcels of land, granted and set 
off to the "Dutch" settlement on the western side 
of the Muscongus river by the Committee of the 
Proprietors of Land, Oct. 2, 1764. Jacob Lud- 
wig, Esq., was authorized by the act of incorpora- 
tion to issue a warrant for the first meeting, which 
was held April 3, 1800, when Capt. Joseph Lud- 
wig was chosen Moderator, Jacob Ludwig, Society 
"Clark," Jacob Winchenbach, Treasurer. 

This Society has had a continuous existence 
down to the present time and the records from 



GERMAN MEETING HOUSE. 215 

1800 to 1 88 1 are in one volume. Miles W. 
Standish served as clerk and sexton for more 
than thirty years. The credit for the careful 
preservation of the old meeting house is largely 
due to this society. 

Visitors to the old German Meeting- House, 
who strolled through the adjoining cemetery have 
been struck with the German predominance of 
our ancestry. Very few English names are 
noticed on the tablets, but Vv'ith much frequency 
appear such names as Creamer, Crammer, Kaler, 
Burkett, Storer, Lash, Vannah, Winchenbach, 
Sides, Seiders, Benner, Welt, Bornehimer, Swier, 
Achorn, Schwartz, Genthner, Kuhn. Feyler, 
Clouse, Castner, Light, Weaver, Levensaler, Kin- 
sell, Miller, Shuman, Smouse, Heyer, Ritz, Star- 
man, Eugley, Gross, Demuth, Orff and Hoch. 

One of the oldest tablets in the yard is of 
slate stone nicely lettered, erected to the memory 
of "Mary Elenora, wife of John Adam Levensaler, 
died Dec. 19, 1798, aged 66 years." The oldest 
stone is that of Fannie Miller, who died Aug. 22, 
1797. There are, however, older graves without 
stones. 

At the upper extremity of the cemetery are 
two modest monuments which always attract the 
attention of visitors. On the first we read this 
inscription : 



216 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

"CONRAD HEYER, 

Born April lo, 1749 

Died Feb. 19, 1856, 

Aged 106 years, 10 months, 9 days. 

Conrad Heyer was the first child born of 
European parents in Waldoboro. He served 
three years in the Revolutionary war. 

This monument is erected by citizens of Wal- 
doboro to perpetuate the memory of an honest 
and worthy man. 

The other monument was erected to the 
memory of the last two pastors of the old church. 
On one side is inscribed: 
"Rev. FREDERICK AUGUSTUS RODOL- 

PHUS BENEDECTUS RITZ, 
born in Germany, 1752, emigrated to this country, 
1784, ordained in Pa. minister of the German 
Lutheran church, 1793, came to this place as 
Pastor 1794 and continued as such until his death 
Feb. 21, 181 1, aged 59 years." 

On the reverse we read: 

"REV. JOHN WILLIAM STARMAN, 
born in Germany A. D. 1773, emigrated to this 
country, 1786, ordained in N. Y., minister of the 
German Lutheran Church and came to this place 
as pastor of above church, 18 12, died Sept. 25, 
1854, aged 81 years." 

The third inscription informs us that 

"This town was settled in 1748 by Germans 



GERMAN MEE TING HO USE. 217 

who emigrated to this place with the promise and 
expectation of finding a populous city, instead of 
which they found nothing but a wilderness; for 
the first few years they suffered to a great extent 
by Indian wars and starvation; by perseverence 
and self denial they succeeded in clearing lands 
and erecting mills. At this time a large proportion 
of the inhabitants are descendants of the first 
settlers. This monument was erected A. D. 1855 
by the subscriptions of citizens of this town." 

The statement that the settlers expected to 
find a populous city should be taken with a de- 
gree of allowance. 



CHAPTER XXII. 

CHURCHES AND LODGES. 

Congregatio7ial Church. 

The Congregational Church was organized 
by an eclesiastical council, convened for that pur- 
pose, May 13. 1807. Six persons composed the 
original membership, as follows: Peleg Oldham, 
Anna Oldham, Alpheus Delano, who were re- 
ceived from the church in Duxbury, Mass., Mary 
Hunt from the church in Pembroke, Mass., Payn 
Elwell and Lucy Elwell from First Church in 
North Yarmouth. From 1807 to 1820 services 
were held in the town house. Early in the spring 
of 1820, work was begun on the meeting house, 
which was completed and dedicated the following 
September. Originally the belfry was surmounted 
by a very tall spire which about 1840 was removed 
and the present tower substituted. When the 
church was built it stood in a large field with no 
houses near it and no road to the main street. A 
Revere bell was installed which still calls the 
worshippers. The sale of pews more than paid 
the cost of the house. As the years went by the 
Universalists who owned pews, claimed the right 
to have preaching part of the time. This precip- 



CHURCHES AND LODGES. 210 

itated a conflict, which was adjusted by the pur- 
chase of their pews. 

Repairs have been made from time to time. 
In 1874 the galleries were removed, the floor 
raised, new windows put in and other improve- 
ments made to the amount of $4,000. A fine 
pipe organ was installed soon after. 

The pastors have been Rev. John R. Cutting 
from 1807 to 1815; Rev. D. M. Mitchell from 
18 16 to 1842; Rev. John Dodge from 1843 ^^ 
1853; Rev. H. M. Stone from 1854 to 1857; Rev. 
Mr. Lightbody from 1857 to 1858; Rev. T. S. 
Robie from 1859 to 1863; Rev. F. B. Knowlton 
six months in 1863; Rev. E. G. Carpenter from 
1865 to 1866; Rev. Charles Packard from 1867 to 
1872; Rev. Andrew J. McLeod from 1872 to 
1880; Rev. E.C. Crane from 1881 to 1883; Rev. 
Wilbur Rand from September, 1884, one year; 
Rev. R. P. Gardner from 1886 to 1888; Rev. 
Herbert I. Senior from 1890 to 1895; R^v. Hugh 
MacCallum from 189710 1899; Rev. William F. 
Siade from 1900 to 1902 ; Rev. William C. Curtis 
from 1903 to 1908. 
Baptist Church. 

July 6, 1824, in response to a petition, the 
churches in Warren, Jefferson and Nobleboro sent 
their pastors and delegates to sit in council with 
the Waldoboro brethren at the home of Charles 
Keen. It was voted to proceed to organize, and 



220 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

the hand of fellowship was extended by Rev. P. 
Pillsbury of Nobleboro, to the following eleven 
persons, who presented letters of dismissal from 
other Baptist churches: Thomas Willett, Cyrus 
Newcomb, Charles Keen, Jacob Kaler, Jacob 
Shuman, John Welt, Mary Keen, Charlotte Shu- 
man, Mary Shuman, Catherine Welt. 

Soon after preaching services were held in 
the homes of the members, Elder Job W^ashburn 
(not pastor as given on page 122) and Mr. 
Samuel Chisam officiating. June 25, 1825, Mr. 
Chisam was ordained as pastor, at the home of 
John Shuman, where outdoor ordination exercises 
were held. Mr. Chisam served the church ten 
years, although he continued to live in Jefferson 
and had no stated salary. Meetings were held in 
the Shuman district and at Feyler's Corner. In 
1837, when Rev. Joseph Wilson became pastor, 
so many members were added that services were 
transferred to the village where a house of wor- 
ship was erected in 1838, at a cost of $3,000. It 
was dedicated Sept. 12, 1838. A fine sounding 
bell was provided. 

In i860, at an expense of $2,800, a spire 
was added and the building raised several feet to 
provide a vestry. In 1889 ^^e building was en- 
tirely remodeled and rededicated. A pipe organ 
had previously been added. 

The church has had the following twenty 



CHURCHES AND LODGES. 221 

pastors: Samuel Chisam, 182510 1835; Joseph 
Wilson, 1837 to 1845; O- B. Walker, 1846 to 
1850; Edward J. Harris, 1850 to 1851; L. C. 
Stevens. 1852 to 1853; Joseph Tuck, 1853; 
Joseph Kalloch, 1855 to 1859; A. H. Estey, i860 
to 1865; H. B. Marshall, 1865 to 1868; Henry 
Stetson, 1868 to 1872; W. G. Goucher, 1872 to 
1874; Luther D. Hill, 187410 1879; G. P.Pendle- 
ton, 1879 to 1880; Albert H. Ford, 1880 to 1884; 
James Graham, 1884 to 1891; G. W. Ellison, 1891 
to 1892; G. W. F. Hill, 1892 to 1900; H. B. Til- 
den, 1 90 1 to 1904; G. F. Sibley, 1904 to 1909; 
Y. H, Pratt, 1909. 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

The M. E. Church at the village was organ- 
ized in August, 1856, Rev. William H. Crawford, 
pastor, although there was some church organiza- 
tion earlier, meetings being held in the town house 
by Father Ellis. During the next year the meet- 
ing house was built, through the efforts of John 
Heyer, Martin Mank and others, who put nearly 
all their means into the work. The meeting house 
was dedicated Oct. 28, 1857. We are unable to 
give a list of the first members, but among those 
early in the church were John Heyer and wife, 
Gilmore Miller and wife, William Schwartz and 
wife, Moses M. Richards and wife, Martin Mank, 
Gardner Achorn, Ward Adams and wife, Gideon 
Hoch and wife. 



222 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

The meeting house was several times repair- 
ed and a bell was presented by Capt. Charles 
Comery. 

The pastors have been William H. Crawford, 
Cyrus Phenix, Phineus Higgins, A. R. Lunt, 
John N. Marsh, Josiah Fletcher, H. B. Wardwell, 
John Collins, J. P. Simonton, Seth Beal, C. L. 
Haskell, William L. Brown, Orrin Tyler, J. R. 
Baker, E. H. Hadlock, D. B. Phelan, T. J. Wright, 
F. L. Hayward, J. A. Weed, T. A. Hodgdon, J. E. 
Lombard, L. L. Harris and N. R. Pearson. 

The W^in slew's Mills chapel was dedicated in 
September, 1894, and is connected with the Wal- 
doboro charge. A bell was placed in the belfry 
in 1907. 
North Waldoboro. 

The North Waldoboro Methodist church was 
organized in 1820, and has an eventful history 
which we have not been able to obtain. The 
meeting house was erected in 1843 ^^<^ "^^-s sup- 
plied with a bell a dozen years ago. 
Orffs Corner Meeting House. 

The meeting house at Orff' s Corner was built 
in 1839 by George W. Genthner, who sold only 
about half the pews. Consequently he made a 
financial loss. By a deed executed June 24, 
1849, h^ ^o^^ P^^^ ■^^- ^ ^° Solomn Orff and John 
Hoch for thirty-five dollars. After his death his 
widow sold the remaining pews. Thirty-seven 



CHURCHES AND LODGES. 223 

years ago the high pulpit was removed, the doors 
taken from the pews and arms substituted. In 
1895 the tower was built and new colored glass 
windows took the place of the old windows. Soon 
after a bell was purchased. It is connected with 
the North Waldoboro M. E. Church. 
South Waldoboro Meetitig Houses. 

In 1855 it was decided to build a meeting 
house at South Waldoboro, but some contention 
arising two houses were built, Baptist and Con- 
gregational. Since i860 the Congregational 
meeting house has been occupied by the Metho- 
dists. In the gale of September, 1869, the Bap- 
tist steeple was blown off and the steeple of the 
other church so weakened that it was soon after 
taken down. In 1909 the Baptists built a bell 
tower and added a bell. Rev. Sidney Packard 
is the pastor. 
West Waldoboro and Dutch Neck. 

In 1888 a chapel was erected at West Wal- 
doboro and dedicated by the Methodists in August 
of that year. A Union Chapel was built on Dutch 
Neck in 1885-86, but has been occupied by the 
Methodists and connected with the Bremen and 
West Waldoboro Circuit of the M. E. Church. 

A chapel was built near Mank's Corner and 
called "Monroe Chapel." A small chapel was 
also erected at Sprague's Corner in the Duck 
Puddle neighborhood. 



224 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Kmg Solomoiis Lodge, F. & A. M. 

In former years the Masonic brethren of 
Waldoboro were connected with St. George 
Lodge of Warren, From 1807 to 1822 this 
fellowship existed. In 1822 an effort was made 
for a charter and it was then arranged for St. 
George Lodge to meet on alternate years in Wal- 
doboro. In 1844, after a suspension of several 
years, caused by the Morgan excitement, work 
was resumed. St. George Lodge held meetings 
in Waldoboro, in the house now occupied by Mrs. 
Dora York, in a hall in Clark's building, and in 
Sprouls block. At the annual communication of 
the Grand Lodge, in May, 1849, ^ charter was 
granted the following brethren: Joseph Clark, 
John Balch, George Sproul, Thomas Genthner, 
James Cole, Jacob Ludwig, Joseph Miller, James 
Cook, Aaron Kaler, Isaac B. Humphrey, John W. 
Tebbetts, William Bearce, Charles Castner, Lewis 
S. Soule, and Rufus Rich, and these brethren 
were instituted into a lodge in January, 1850, and 
designated as King Solomon's Lodge, No. 61. 
The lodge room was in Sproul's block. 

In 1854 the Lodge being burned and charter 
destroyed, a new charter was issued to Joseph 
Miller, John Balch, Lewis S. Soule, C. C. Atwell, 
William Eugley, Thomas Genthner, John W. 
Tebbetts, Alden F. Miller, William Bearce and 
William S. Cochran. A lodee room was estab- 



CHURCHES AND LODGES. 225 

lished in the Samson block where the lodge re- 
mained till 1879 when more commodious rooms 
were found in Clark's building. In the fall of 
1902 the Lodge moved to rooms which had been 
finished for it in the Mathews & Gay building. 
The present membership in 1 14. 

Wiwurna Chapter, No. 34, Order of the East- 
ern Star, was organized in 1895 and received a 
charter the next year. It has a membership of 
fifty-two. 
Germania Lodge, I. O. O. F. 

Odd Fellowship in Waldoboro dates back to 
Medomak Lodge, No. 23, which was instituted 
Jan. 20, 1845. I^ 1S50 the lodge reported 65 
members; invested funds, $500. The lodge was 
unfortunate in having been burned out three 
times, the last time in 1854, from the effects of 
which it never rallied. The whole number initi- 
ted was 93. The following became members of 
the Grand Lodge: C. C. Atwell, John H. 
Kennedy, Alden Jackson, William Ludwig, A. T. 
Moses, and John B. Wildes. 

Germania Lodge, No. 57, was instituted 
Nov. 22, 1877, with the following charter members: 
William B. Creamer, Charles D. Creamer, Osmay 
S. Head, Charles H. Lilly, Harvey C. Heyer, 
Webster L. Mathews and Aaron O. Winchenbach. 
The lodge finished a hall in the Schwartz & 
Castner building, which was subsequently pur- 



22 G HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

chased. The lodge remained there till 1904, 
when a move was made to the elegant rooms in 
the new Odd Fellows' building on Jefferson street. 
This lodge has been v^ery prosperous, having a 
membership of 175, and owning two buildings. 

Good Luck Rebekah Lodge, No. 72, was in- 
stituted Feb. 28, 1896, and has a membership of 
108. 
Maine Lodge, Knights of Pythias. 

Maine Lodge, K. of P., was instituted Jan. 7, 
1895, with the following charter members : George 
Bliss, Edwin O. Clark, George L. Welt, Jesse K. 
Willett, Osmay S. Head, Herbert L. Leavitt, L. 
C. Mank, G. W. Rowe, W. E. Philbrook, W. M. 
Sides, L. W. Parsons, W. C. Creamer, E. S. Per- 
kins, Harrison Hilton, W. S. Winslow, \V. E. 
Clark, F. B. Miller, F. O. Miller, B. A. Boggs, 
A. E. Boggs, John Burkett, M. M. Johnson, J. 
W. Sanborn, F. B. Hahn. C. A. Richards, C. H. 
Howard, P. S. Whitney, C. H. Curtis, J. C. Chip- 
man, G. O. Waltz. 

A fine lodge room was fitted up in Union block 
which was burned in 1900, when the Lodge moved 
into their present commodious rooms in the Jack- 
son building. It has a membership of 100. 

Ermine Assembly, Pythian Sisterhood, was 
instituted March 11, 1902, merged into Temple 
of Pythian Sisters, in February, 1907. Present 
membership 35. 



CHURCHES AND LODGES. 227 

Waldoboro Grange. 

Waldoboro Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, 
No. 406, was chartered April i, 1893. It holds 
its meetings in Grand Army hall. It has a 
membership of 113. 

Maple Grange at North Waldoboro is in a 
flourishing condition. 
Charles Keizer Post, G. A. R. 

Charles Keizer Post, No. 135, Grand Army 
of the Republic, was organized March 30, 1885, 
its charter being dated April 25, 1885. It was 
named for Charles Keizer, a member of Company 
E, 20th Maine regiment, killed at Laurel Hill, 
near Spottsylvania, Va. The charter members 
were Samuel L. Miller, James H. Stanwood, F. 
M. Eveleth, Thomas R. Hogue, William H. 
Levensaler, George G. Benner, Austin Keizer, 
Danby L. Creamer, Toleman Mathews, James 
Ludwig, Elijah S. Levensaler, George W. Young, 
John W. Palmer, David H. Kimball, Frank A. 
Hutchins, Isaac W. Comery, Byron M. Castner, 
Thomas A. Kaler, Robert Creamer, Aaron O. 
Winchenbach. The Post owns the building in 
which it meets. Its membership is 3 1 . 

The Woman's State Relief Corps, No. 56, 
was organized May 27, 1889. ^t has a member- 
ship of 29. 



CHAPTER XXIII. 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 

A genealogical table of the former inhabi- 
tants of Waldoboro, involving the labor of years, 
would necessarily be incomplete and unsatis- 
factory, but a history of the town would not be 
acceptable which did not give some special ac- 
count of its founders and notable citizens. In 
this chapter, therefore, an attempt will be made 
to give sketches of citizens, who have been promi- 
nent in theological, legal and medical professions 
and in politics. It is a matter of regret that we 
have no information concerning such men as Dr. 
John Christopher Walleazer, Dr. John G. Borne- 
man, Charles Leistner and others. 
Conrad Heyer. 

Conrad' Heyer, considered the first white 
child born in the present town of Waldoboro, 
after the first permanent settlement, was born at 
Schenck's Point, on the eastern side of Broad 
Bay, April lo, 1749. His father, Martin Heyer, 
died from exposure and hunger during the winter 
before Conrad was born. He grew to manhood 
in the settlement. When the first meeting house 

I. The Germany way of spelling this is Konratl. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 229< 

was dedicated he was among the singers, although 
only about fifteen years of age. At twenty-two 
he was an active member of the German Lutheran 
church. On the breaking out of the Revolution 
he appears to have been in Boston, probably 
having gone thither in one of the coasting vessels. 
He immediately joined the army at Cambridge. 
He must have enlisted from some other colony 
than Massachusetts, as his name does not appear 
on the Massachusetts rolls. However, he served 
long and faithfully in the ranks of those who- 
fought for independence. He was stationed at 
Ticonderoga where he helped construct portions 
of the fortifications. He crossed the Delaware 
with Washington, forming one of the Vanguard 
on that occasion when the troops suffered much 
from the cold, being poorly clad. After the war 
Mr. Heyer settled on a farm in the north part of 
the town. He enjoyed the distinction of being 
not only the first white person born in town, but 
living to greater age than any other citizen ever 
attained. He never was, until the winter he died, 
confined a day by sickness. He died Feb. 19, 
1856, aged 106 years, 10 months, 9 days. A full 
account of his burial with military honors is givea 
in Chapter XVI. 
Rev. John Martin Shaeffer. 

Rev. John Martin Shaeffer was the first Ger- 
man Protestant minister in Waldoboro. He was. 



230 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

sometimes called Dr. Shseffer, not because he 
had conferred on him the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity, but for the reason that he had some 
knowledge of bleeding and blistering, and not 
only preached the gospel but practiced medicine. 
He was a native of Germany but came to Broad 
Bay from Boston. He was introduced into the 
settlement by General Waldo, or his son-in-law, 
Mr. Fluker, soon after the second colony arrived 
in 1753. At the commencement of the Revolu- 
tion he was a tory and carried his political doc- 
trines into the pulpit. He invariably refused to 
pray for the success of the American armies. He 
was a smart preacher and a good singer. His 
moral character was rather equivocal. He left a 
wife in Germany, seduced the wife of another and 
brought her to this country with him. He was 
profane, intemperate and gradually lost all in- 
fluence as a minister of the gospel. He made 
the settlers believe it was necessary to be bled 
every spring, for which he received a regular fee 
of fifty cents. He is said to have charged a 
stated fee for every funeral, marriage, and for 
every baptism, which he was careful to have paid 
before performing the rite. 

These emoluments, with such advantages as his 
prosperity, influence and superior education, en- 
abled him to take in making bargains, soon ren- 
dered him opulent. He engaged in navigation, 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 231 

took lumber and wood of the settlers at his own 
price, liquidating the accounts in his own way. 
Many a poor German had to work a week for 
him, to pay for the annual loss of blood in him- 
self and family, and when any considerable sick- 
ness occurred, a sloop hold full of wood went to 
pay the doctor's bill. He remained in Waldoboro 
after being deposed from the church. He finally 
removed to Warren. While absent in Boston his 
house was entered by four men in disguise, who 
seized the women, pinioned their arms and con- 
fined them in the cellar. Then they broke open 
the closets and chests and carried off the gold 
and silver they contained. Thus went a larger 
part of the doctor's ill-gotten hoard. He return- 
ed in rage and dispair and plunging still deeper 
into intemperance, expired on the 20th of April, 
1794. Mr. Copeland, who had been administrator 
of the doctor's estate, married the widow on the 
20th of August following. 
Rev. Frederick Gruhner. 

Rev. Frederick Gruhner, (commonly pro- 
nounced Kroner) was born at or near Frankfort 
on the Mayne in Germany. He was well versed 
in Latin, German and French languages and in 
theology. He was licensed to preach the gospel 
as a German Lutheran teacher. x'\fter the de- 
parture of Rev. Dr. Theobald, it is believed he 
recommended Gruhner to the people of Waldo- 



232 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

boro. He was examined by a committee consist- 
ing of Dr. Walleazer, Jacob Ludwig, Joseph Lud- 
wig and Conrad Heyer and found qualified. In 
the pulpit he was graceful and eloquent. A short 
time after his settlement he married a daugh- 
ter of John Ulmer. It was soon discovered that 
he spent much time, on week days, at the tavern 
where he indulged in drinking and card playing. 
He contracted debts and became embarrassed. 
Forseeing that his career would end in his dis- 
missal, he preached his last sermon, from the 
text: John the Evangelist, 7th Chapter, 34th 
verse. The next morning those who sought him 
could not find him for he had started early on 
horseback, and proceeded west beyond the reach 
of his creditors. Neither his friends, nor his wife 
were ever advised of his whereabouts or pursuits. 
Rev. Frederick Augustus Rodolphus Benedictus 

RiTZ.' 

The minister with the long name was born 
in Germany in 1752, and received a classical edu- 
cation at the University of Helmstadt. He emi- 
grated to this country in 1784, and was ordained 
in Pennsylvania minister of the German Lutheran 
Church in 1793. He came to Waldoboro in 1794 
and continued as pastor until his death which oc- 
curred Feb. 21, 181 1, at the age of 59 years. He 

I. This name has been spelled Retz. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 233 

was the first minister who occupied the pulpit of 
the old meeting house after its removal to its 
present site. He always preached in the German 
language. After he was settled in Waldoboro he 
married Margaret Hahn and was given a farm 
twenty-five rods wide extending from the Me- 
domak river to the Kaler pond. His dwelling 
house was north of the cemetery and not far 
from the church. It was a timber house, dove- 
tailed at the corners and was torn down after his 
death. When first called upon by the neighbor- 
ing clergy Mr, Ritz was able to converse with 
them only in Latin. He was a dignified man as 
was becoming his position. His nearest approach 
to levity ever known of him is contained in the 
following annecdote: Mr. Demuth had taken of- 
fence and refused to speak to him. Mr. Ritz in 
company with a friend, passing him one day, in 
the usual manner without a nod, the friend ob- 
served: "There goes Mr. Demuth." "Nein, 
nein," said the minister, "neicht Meister Demuth, 
Meister Hochmuth." May 22, 1809, he certified 
that he had received a lot of land in lieu of a 
hundred acres of ministerial lands. 
Rev. John William Starman. 

Mr. Starman was a native of Germany, born 
in Lenep, near Elberfeld, in 1773, a subject of the 
Elector of Palatine. His father was pastor of the 
Lutheran church in Lenep. He received his edu- 



234 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

cation in the schools of his native town and in his 
father's house. In the 3/ear 1796, he went to 
New York where he boarded a greater part of the 
time in the family of Dr. Guisenhainer. The 
doctor, seeing he was religiously inclined, en- 
couraged him to prepare for the gospel ministry. 
He did so, was examined by the Lutheran Synod 
and accepted. After the death of Mr. Ritz, a 
meeting of the church was held and Capt. Charles 
Miller was delegated with power to go to Phila- 
delphia and engage a preacher. He visited the 
church in Philadelphia and was recommended to 
Mr. Starman. After conversing with him he gave 
him a call to come to Waldoboro. Whereupon 
he set out on his journey and arrived here and 
preached his first sermon in the old German 
meetinor house late in the fall of 18 12. 

Soon after Mr. Starman's settlement in Wal- 
doboro, his friends advised him to marry. They 
went so far as to designate who he should marry. 
The lady designated consented to the conditions 
and they were married. 

For the first eight years in Waldoboro he 
preached entirely in German, but perceiving that 
the use of German was dying out and that in a 
few years English would take its place, he made 
the latter language a study and in 1820 he ven- 
tured to preach his first English sermon in his 
own meeting house. This sermon cost him much 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 235 

labor in the writing and much effort in its dehvery 
but he made himself well understood. From 
1820 to 1835 he preached an English sermon one 
Sunday in four; than one half the time in German 
and half in English. About 1840 he preached 
one Sunday in four in German and on those 
days the sacrament of the Lord's Supper was 
administered. The church had been divided 
from the first between the Lutherans and German 
Reformed. At the celebration of the Lord's 
Supper, the former took the bread and wine from 
the communion service themselves, while the latter 
had the bread put into their mouths and the wine 
cup held to their lips by the deacon. Mr. Star- 
man labored hard and long to reconcile these 
trifling differences and finally he had the satis- 
faction of seeing both sects come to the same 
communion table and unite in undivided fellow- 
ship. 

Mr. Starman was in person about six feet in 
height; in manner bland and courteous, stately 
and graceful in his movements. In preaching he 
was eloquent and rapid in delivery in German. 
In English he was somewhat embarrassed, owing 
to the difference of idiom of the lanofuaees. For 
example, in one of his English sermons he was 
speaking of the tongue, of its influence and power 
over the character and happiness of society, and 
he said: "Like the helm of a ship it is." He 



236 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

made such advances in the English language that 
he was able to act as a member of the superin- 
tending school committee. He died Sept. 25, 
1854. The intelligence of his death was received 
by the people of Waldoboro, of all religious de- 
nominations, with heartfelt sorrow. 
Col. Jacob Ludv;ig. 

Jacob Ludwig was born in Germany in i 730 ; 
settled at Broad Bay in 1753; married Margaret 
Hilt in 1755. He and his brother Joseph lo- 
cated on opposite sides of the Medomak river 
immediately after their arrival and the farms they 
took up they continued to occupy till their death. 
Colonel Ludwig held many offices, from common 
road surveyor to town representative. He ac- 
quired enough of the English language to enable 
him to record the early transactions of the town 
intelligibly. In the latter part of the French and 
Indian war he seems to have resided in Boston 
where he enlisted in the army and did service 
at Ticonderoga, Lake George and Crown Point. 
In 1776 he was chosen captain of company sent 
to Castine for the protection of that place. His 
knowledge of both English and German eminently 
fitted him to act as a magistrate among a mixed 
population. He retained his faculties till the 
time of his death, which took place in Waldo- 
boro, Jan. I, 1826. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 237 

Dr. Theobald. 

Dr. Ernest Frederick Philip Theobald was 
at Doernigheim, near Frankfort-on-the-Main, in 
Germany, Dec. 2, 1750. He graduated from the 
University of Gottingen in 1772. He studied 
medicine and also fitted himself for the ministry. 
Having an acquaintance with Baron Reidesel, he 
obtained a commission as chaplain in the Hessian 
Division of Burgoyne's army which surrendered 
to the Americans at Saratoga, Oct. 17. 1777. 
A portion of these prisoners, including Dr. Theo- 
bald, were marched to Boston and paroled. He 
appears to have been in Dresden in 1778. If so 
he must have come to Waldoboro later as tradition 
makes his stay here about three years. He was 
married to Sally Rittal at Pownalboro, (now 
Dresden) Feb. 22, 1781, by Jonathan Bowman, 
Esq. He may have been here between these 
dates. He died in Dresden in 1809, leaving 
several sons and daughters.' 
Waterman Thomas. 

It seems strange that a man of so much promi- 
nence should be so little known. He came from 
Mansfield, Mass., and was engaged in trade. 
When the town was incorporated he was chosen 
the first moderator, and in 1799, when the Custom 
House was established, he was appointed Col- 

I. Charles E. Allen, Esq. 



238 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

lector of Customs. He was a nephew of Major 
General John Thomas, who died at Chamblee, 
Canada, June 2, 1776. Waterman Thomas was 
a man of great popularity, doing an extensive 
business. By virtue of authority conferred upon 
him by the act of incorporation of the town of 
Thomaston, he issued the warrant, to Mason 
Wheaton, warning all inhabitants and freeholders 
to assemble and choose all necessary town officers. 
From this act the town is said to take its name. 
He built a fine house near Thomas's Hill which 
was burned about forty-five years ago. In later 
years his fortune departed and he became a de- 
faulter. 
Dr. Benjamin Brown. 

Benjamin Brown, M. D., was born in Swan- 
sea, Mass., Sept. 23, 1756. He was a descendant 
of Chad Brown and Roger Williams. In 1778 he 
was surgeon on board the frigate Boston, com- 
manded by Capt. Samuel Tucker, under orders to 
convey Hon. John Adams as envoy to France. 
He probably served with Tucker also on the sloop 
of war Thorn. Dec. 21, 1780, he was married to 
Susannah Wells. Dr. Brown oscilated between 
Bremen, Waldoboro and Providence, and finally 
located in Waldoboro between iSoo and 1802. 

Dr. Brown was a physician and surgeon of the 
old school and he continued in practice in Waldo- 
boro till his death which occurred Sept. 17, 1831. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 239 

Roads were not so numerous in those days and 
he traveled on horseback, carrying his medicine in 
saddle bags. That he enjoyed the confidence of 
the people was shown by his election to the Legis- 
lature and Representative to Congress serving 
from Dec. 4th, i8 15 to March 3d, 18 17. He was at 
one time largely interested in shipping, but lost 
his property through capture by the French and 
thereafter had to depend upon his profession for 
his support. 

After the completion of his term as President, 
Hon. John Adams came to Waldoboro and was 
hospitably entertained by Dr. Brown. 
Henry Frederick Helmershausen. 

Henry Frederick Helmershausen was born 
at Wallichen, an estate near Weimar, in the 
Grand-duchy of Saxe- Weimar, March 27, 1851. 
He had two sons. The eldest, Henry Frederick 
Helmershausen, born Sept. 3, 1784, married 
Lydia McLintook in Waldoboro, July 22, 18 17, 
died Aug. 24, 1865. 

Henry Frederick Helmershausen, Senior, 
served in the war of the Revolution from March 
II, 1778, to March 11, 1781, in Col. Elisha 
Sheldon's 2nd Continental Light Dragoons. He 
was commissioned as Forage Master Oct. 3, 1780, 
and placed in charge of a brigade of teams loaded 
with stores for the continental army Aug. 22, 
1 78 1. He came to Waldoboro in 1802. Being 



240 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

about to visit his old home in Germany he re- 
ceived the following document from the Waldo- 
boro selectmen : 

Waldoboro, May 7, 1805. 
This may certifv to whom it concerns, that Henry 
Frederick Helmershausen has been an inhabitant of this town 
for three years past, and he has always maintained the charac- 
ter of a good citizen, and as such we take this method of rec- 
ommending him. 

Jacob Ludwig ") Selectmen of 
George Demuth >• the Town of 
Thomas McGuyer J Waldoborough. 

He left Boston in the ship Adams, May 31, 
1805, and returned from Hamburg, April 30, 1806. 
His wife Anna died in Waldoboro, July 2, 1831. 
Both his sons served in the war of 18 12. One of 
his most noted grandsons was Rev. Edwin Adams 
Helmershausen, born in 1842, died in 1873; in 
the ministry of the M. E. Church eleven years ; 
Presiding Elder. One of his granddaughters is 
Adella Helmershausen, the poetess, residing in 
Chicago. He was buried in the Robinson bury- 
ing ground, Jefferson. 
Joshua Head. 

Joshua Head was born in Boston, July 18, 
1767, and died in Warren, Aug. 3, 1841. He 
married a sister of the wife of Governor King. 
He came to Waldoboro previous to 1795 and 
went into trade with his brother John, who was 
postmaster of Waldoboro twenty-six years. He 
had another brother in Warren and one in Bos- 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 241 

ton, all merchants. Joshua Head erected the 
mansion at Kaler's Corner, now owned by G. W. 
Clouse. The farm connected consisted of 125 
acres. He was a candidate for Congress. 
Charles Miller. 

Son of Frank and Anna Miller, was born in 
Waldoboro, November 5, 1772; died there No- 
vember 26, 1846; married first, Elizabeth Kinsell, 
born in Waldoboro, 1766, died there February 18, 
181 7; married second, Fanny Boyd of Wiscasset, 
intentions of marriage filed March 12, 18 19. She 
was born July 28, 1780; died Waldoboro, October 
23, 1846. 

Charles Miller was for many years one of the 
leading business men in his community, and was 
prominent and influential in public affairs. He 
devoted himself almost exclusively to his business 
interests, in the affairs of his native town and 
state, and in a quiet way rendered effective service 
to the party with which he was politically indenti- 
fied. In 1816, Mr. Miller represented Waldoboro 
in the General Court of Massachusetts, and was a 
member of the lower branch of the Maine legis- 
lature in 1826, 1827, 1828, 1829, 1830, 1833 and 
1834, a legislative career exceeded by few, and 
marked by good judgment and honorable service. 

Mr, Miller passed his early life on the home 
farm in Waldoboro, and his education was that 
which he was able to obtain by attendance during 



242 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

the winter months at the district school. His 
deficiencies in early education were neutralized by 
a shrewd observation, and a careful and continued 
reading of general and secular literature, aided by 
a natural aptitude for acquiring information. 

After he moved to the village he engaged in 
trade dealing in a line of goods which embraced 
nearly every article required for family and gen- 
eral use. At first his business ventures were 
conducted on a small scale, but as they continued 
to increase he entered upon a notable career of 
ship building which covered many years of active 
and intelligent service. During his fifty years of 
business life, he built in his shipyard on the Me- 
domak river a fleet of 25 vessels, the lumber for 
which was procured from the neighboring forests. 
He retained the sole ownership of nearly every 
vessel he constructed. With his vessel holdings 
and other forms of property, he left at his death a 
considerable fortune. 
Frederick Castner. 

Frederick Castner, who died in Waldoboro, 
Sept. 26, 1876, at the age of 98 years, 9 months, 
was born in Waldoboro and had always been a 
resident of the village. He successfully followed 
the business of merchant and shipbuilder, and for 
several years served the town as selectman, though 
all the time his own political party was in the 
minority. He was a member of Colonel Reed's 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 243 

battalion when it went to the defense of Camden 
in 1814. His property was destroyed by fire 
three times within seven years. 

Col. Isaac G. Reed. 

Col. Isaac Gardner Reed was born in Little- 
ton, Mass., Nov. 16, 1783. His father, Isaac 
Reed, was a graduate of Harvard College. His 
mother, Mary Gardner, was a daughter of Isaac 
Gardner, who was slain at Lexington. He gradu- 
ated from Harvard College, class of 1803. He 
read law with Hon. John Locke of Bellerica, and, 
having been admitted to the bar, he came to Jef- 
son in 1807. March 2, 1808, he removed to Wal- 
doboro, where he entered upon the practice of his 
profession with untiring energy and gratifying 
success. He married the widow of George D. 
Smouse. He was a member of the convention 
which framed the constitution of Maine and de- 
signed and prepared the seal of the State. He 
took great interest in military matters and rose 
to the rank of colonel of the militia. His figure 
on horseback always attracted attention. He died 
in Waldoboro, April 26, 1847. 

William J. Farley. 

William Jewett Farley was fitted for college 
at Lincoln and Hebron academies and graduated 
from Bowdoin College in the class of 1820. 
He read law with Col. Isaac G. Reed and was 
admitted to the bar of Lincoln County after the 



244 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

usual period of study. He located first in Cam- 
den in 1825. From Camden he moved the next 
year to Thomaston. He was a candidate for 
Congress twice but was defeated. He died in 
Thomaston, July 16, 1839, in the thirty-sixth year 
of his age. 
William Sproul. 

William Sproul was born in Bristol. He was 
a son of James Sproul, who came from the north 
of Ireland to Bristol about 1740. William married 
Jane Johnson of Bristol, and removed to Waldo- 
boro in the spring of 1797, purchasing the farm 
and mills of John Ulmer, which extended west- 
ward from the river and included much of the 
present business part of the village. He built a 
house which was moved off when the Sproul 
block was built. He was engaged in shipbuilding 
in Bristol and continued to some extent in Wal- 
doboro. He died in Waldoboro, April 18, 1840. 
His son George was born here April 23, 1800. 
Henry Kennedy. 

Dea, Henry Kennedy was born in the north 
western part of Waldoboro, Sept. 23, 1797, and 
and died at his home in \A^aldoboro village, Oct. 
13' 1 8/5' 3.t the age of 76 years. His boyhood 
was spent upon the farm. In 1824 he came to 
Waldoboro village and commenced business as a 
trader in partnership with Joseph Clark. Dis- 
solving his connection with Mr. Clark, he entered 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 245 

upon the business of shipbuilding which he fol- 
lowed till his death. He filled several positions 
as a town officer and represented Lincoln county 
in the Maine Senate. In 1837 ^^ united with the 
Baptist church and in 1844 was chosen Deacon. 
He was devoted to the church and was its most 
able supporter during his life. His benevolence 
was broad; he was a friend of the sick and the 
poor and always ready to contribute to objects of 
charity. He was connected with the militia and 
at the time of the Aroostook war held the rank 
of Brigadier General. 
Samuel W. Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson was born in Jefferson, Nov. 30, 
1812. Died in Waldoboro, May 25, 1896. He 
came to Waldoboro, Oct. i, 1853, to assume the 
duties of Deputy Collector of Customs. He 
served eight years in the Custom House, after 
which he remained in Waldoboro. In 1863 he 
was elected a director of the Medomak Bank, and 
Oct. 24, 1864, was chosen President. He was 
representative from Waldoboro to the legislature 
in 1864 and 1865. For many years he was town 
clerk and he frequently served as selectman and 
assessor. In town affairs he was considered 
authority, and he was always interested in the 
town. 
John Bulfinch. 

John Bulfinch was born in Boston, Sept. 29, 



246 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

1 79 1, and died at his home in Waldoboro, Nov. 
23, 1884, at the age of ninety-three years. He 
was the son of Jeremiah Bulfinch. In 18 12 he 
graduated from Harvard University. He paid a 
portion of his college expenses by writing legal 
and official documents. He was the last survivor 
of his class. After graduation he sold the proper- 
ty in Maiden, which he had inherited from his 
grandfather, John Bulfinch of Boston, and 
removed to Belfast, Me., where he became a 
a teacher in the Belfast academy. He read law 
in the office of B. P. Field, Esq. of Belfast, and 
also with Hon. Samuel Thatcher of Warren, who 
was the attorney of General Knox. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar at the Supreme Judicial Court at 
Wiscasset, in May, 1819. 

He opened an office in Union where he re- 
mained seven years. He became interested in 
education and was four times elected a member of 
the school committee. On one occasion he incur- 
red great personal danger by rescuing a young 
lad from drowning, for which act he was presented 
with a gold medal by the Massachusetts Humane 
Society. He was a man of small stature. 

In November, 1823, Mr. Bulfinch removed to 
Waldoboro, where he continued to practice law. 
June 28, 1825, he married Sophrona Pike of Cam- 
den, who died Dec. 27, 1859. 

He had an extensive practice in the courts of 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 247 

Lincoln county and was considered a sound lawyer 
and careful adviser. As the early allotments of 
land were often poorly defined, boundry lines 
were frequently contested, and on many occasions 
it was necessary for him to unite the labors of sur- 
veyor to those of the lawyer. 

The people of Waldoboro were very generally 
engaged in shipbuilding and commerce, with 
which interests Mr. Bulfinch soon became asso- 
ciated. With his son-in-law, Capt. H. H. Lovell, 
he purchased the ship "Jenny Lind," which after 
two voyages to Europe, was sold in New York. 
The ship "Wings of the Morning" was then built 
in Waldoboro, and dispatched under command of 
Capt. Lovell to San Francisco by way of Cape 
Horn. 

At Waldoboro Mr. Bulfinch continued active 
in all that related to the schools and for a number 
of years he aided in maintaining a private academy. 
He possessed a fine literary taste and culture and 
amid all the cares of a busy life he retained a 
practical knowledge of the classical languages. In 
his old age he might frequently be seen reading 
the Greek testiment or the Latin Commentaries 
of Caesar. 
George D. Smouse. 

George Demuth Smouse was born in Waldo- 
boro, Feb. 5, 1799, and died in Waldoboro, May 
17, 1880, aged 81 years, 3 months. He was old- 



248 HISTORY OF IVALDOBORO. 

est son of Capt. George D. Smouse, a name now 
extinct in Waldoboro. His sister Bertha married 
Dr. John G. Brown. When the Medomak Bank 
was organized in 1836, Mr. Smouse was chosen 
President and he was a director of the bank forty- 
four years. He was an active member of the 
German Protestant Society. He was in the ship- 
building business with his half-brother, Isaac 
Reed, and Augustus Welt, under the name of 
Reed, Welt & Co. which continued till his death. 
His knowledge of the early history of Waldoboro 
was very accurate and full, his honesty was pro- 
verbial, his word as good as his bond. 
Nathaniel Groton. 

Hon. Nathaniel Groton was born in Waldo- 
boro and graduated from Bowdoin College in 
1 8 14. He commenced the study of law in the 
office Col. Isaac G. Reed and finished it with Hon. 
Benjamin Ames of Bath. After his admission to 
the bar he opened an office in Bath. In 1832 
and 1834 he was elected senator from Lincoln 
County and in the latter year was appointed Judge 
of Probate, a position he held by successive ex- 
ecutive appointment till near the time of his death 
which occurred at Bath, Oct. 25, 1858. 

Dr. John G. Brown. 

Dr. John G. Brown, son of Dr. Benjamin 
Brown, was born in Providence, R. I., in 1797. 
He received an academical course at Lincoln 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 249 

Academy and studied medicine with his father and 
was graduated from Bowdoin Medicial College in 
1826. He practiced his profession several years 
in Waldoboro, and married Miss Bertha Smouse. 
He built the house on the corner of Main and 
Church streets, now owned by Capt. John B. 
Stahl, which he sold to the late James Hovey. 
He removed to the city of Bangor, then to Rox- 
bury, Mass. From Roxbury he removed to 
Reading where he died in 1866. 
Dr. John Manning. 

Dr. John Manning was born in Gloucester, 
Mass., Oct. 12, 1789. He graduated from Har- 
vard College in 18 10 and became a* physician. 
The same year his father fitted him out with a 
horse, saddle, saddle bags filled with medicine, 
and told him to "shift for himself." He started 
for Waldoboro with a letter of introduction to 
Payn Elwell, a former resident of Gloucester, and 
was some ten days on the journey, every day of 
which it rained. His success in obtaining patients 
in competition with Dr. Brown was not flattering 
the first three or four years, and he obtained ap- 
pointment on board the Privateer "Monmouth" 
sailing from Portland, but he made only one 
voyage and returned to Waldoboro, where he 
gradually secured standing and the good will of 
the older physicians, not only here but in sur- 
rounding towns, and was frequently called in con- 



250 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

sultation. He continued in practice and mean- 
time acted as town clerk. In 1834 he was chosen 
senator for Lincoln county. In 1842, he removed 
his family to Rockport, Mass., where he practiced 
till his death which occurred Feb. 7, 1852. He 
lived in Waldoboro in the house now owned by 
Miss Elizabeth Genthner. 
Hon. Isaac Reed. 

Hon Isaac Reed was born in Waldoboro, 
Aug. 22, 1809, and was the oldest son of Col. 
Isaac G. Reed. He fitted for college at Bloom- 
field Academy, but, as he preferred mercantile 
life, he decided not to enter college. He was 
senior member of the well-known firm of Reed, 
Welt & Co., and was President of the Waldoboro 
State and National Bank during its entire exist- 
ence of thirty-two years. From 1843, ^or more 
than twenty-five years, he presided over the Wal- 
doboro town meetings. He was a member of the 
board of selectmen for many years ; he represent- 
ed the town in the Maine legislature six times 
and was elected to the Maine senate five times, 
and he was a member of the State board of Agri- 
culture and a Trustee of the Maine Insane Hos- 
pital. In 1854 and 1855 he was the whig candi- 
date for governor and served as State Treasurer 
in 1856; he was a member of the thirty-second 
Congress, and it was through his influence that 
an appropriation was obtained to build the Wal- 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 251 

doboro Custom House and Post Office. He died 
in Waldoboro, Sept. 19, 1887. 

Reujjen Seiders. 

Reuben Seiders, son of Jacob Seiders, was 
born in Waldoboro, in 1809. He graduated from 
Bowdoin College in 183 1, and from the Harvard 
Divinity School in Cambridge in 1836, becoming 
a Unitarian preacher. He was united in marriage 
with a Miss Austin, taking her name. The Aus- 
tin family possessed an ample fortune and Mr. 
Austin, as we may call him, preached only when 
it was convenient for him to do so. He died in 
Cambridge in 1847. 

Dr. William Ludwig. 

William Ludwig studied medicine with Dr. 
Benjamin Brown and after two full courses of lec- 
tures he ofraduated from Bowdoin Medical Colleore, 
class of 1825, and entered upon the practice of 
his profession in Waldoboro where he died in 
1849. 
Dr. Hiram Bliss. 

Dr. Hiram Bliss was born in Vershire, Vt., 
May 18, 1805. He graduated at Dartmouth in 
1825, and practiced his profession at Vershire 
and at Longmeadow, Mass. He came to Waldo- 
boro in 1833 and practiced medicine here till his 
death which occurred Jan. 26, 1874. 



252 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

John H. Kennedy, 

John H. Kennedy was born in Jefferson where 
he received a common school education. He 
came to Waldoboro and read law with Col. Isaac 
G. Reed, whom Mr. Kennedy always referred to 
as "Colonel Reed." 

Mr. Kennedy had a large law practice and 
was also interested in shipping. He was one of 
the leading lawyers of Lincoln County, and was 
County Attorney of that county when it included 
what is now Knox, Sagadahoc and Androscoggin. 
A leading lawyer of his day said of him: "Ken- 
nedy's plain, simple manner of addressing a jury, 
makes him a hard man to meet." He was noted 
for his honesty, generosity, genial disposition and 
the simplicity and carelessness of his dress. He 
was familiarly known and called "John H." 

He died in Waldoboro, March 30, 1863, aged 
45 years. 
Albion P. Oakes. 

Albion P. Oakes was born in Sangerville, 
Maine, Aug. 14, 1826. He attended Foxcroft 
Academy and graduated from Waterville College, 
at eighteen. After graduation he studied law in 
Waterville and graduated from Balston Spar Law 
School. He first taught school in Waldoboro in 
1847. Later he was a law partner of Hon. S. S. 
Marble. He married Miss Ella A. Clark, Oct. 17, 
1853, and died in Waldoboro, June 21, 1859. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 253 

Capt. Herman Kopperholdt. 

Captain Kopperholdt was born in Aarhuus, 
North Denmark, June 22, 18 14. Having finished 
his education, he went to sea as a cabin boy with his 
uncle. He sailed in various crafts till 1835, when 
he arrived in Charleston, S. C, where he shipped 
on the ship Majestic of Thomaston. In 1853 he 
took command of ship Ella A. Clark. In 1859, 
having sold the ship Ella A. Clark in Liverpool, 
he came here and was put in command of ship J. 
Webster Clark. In 1863, he took the new ship 
Edwin Clark, and when he left this ship he re- 
tired from the sea. He died in Waldoboro, Jan, 
1 1, 1891. 
Capt. H. H. Lovell. 

Harvey Hinckley Lovell was born in Barn- 
stable, Mass., Nov. 30, 181 7, and died in Waldo- 
boro, April 20, 1899. He went to sea at the age 
of fifteen years and at nineteen was an officer. 
A few years later he was master. He success- 
fully commanded two barks and several ships, 
among them the Jenny Lind, Wings of the Adorn- 
ing and John Harvey. He came to W^aldoboro 
in 185 I and retired from active business in 1873. 
He married a daughter of John Bulfinch, Esq. 
Hon. Sebastian S. Marble. 

Mr. Marble was born in Dixfield, March i, 
18 1 7. He practiced law in Wilton and Dixfield 
and came to Waldoboro in 1851 and continued 



254 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

his law practice. He was Deputy Collector of 
Customs at Waldoboro from 1861 to 1863, and 
Collector from 1863 to 1866; was Register of 
Bankruptcy from 1867 to 1870, U. S. Marshal for 
Maine from 1870 to 1878. He was elected to the 
Maine Senate in 1882, 1884, and 1886, and as 
President of the Senate, became Governor on the 
death of Governor Bodwell. 
Joseph Clark. 

Joseph Clark was born in Jefferson where he 
received such education as the common schools 
afforded. In his early years he taught school. 
In 1823 he came to Waldoboro and went into 
trade, taking as a partner the following year, 
Henry Kennedy. This partnership continued 
three years. A year or two after the dissolution, 
both Mr. Clark and Mr. Kennedy commenced 
shipbuilding the same season, Mr. Clark building 
a top-sail schooner at the cove just above the shoe 
factory. This property he afterwards sold to 
William Matthews. In 1835 he built the ship 
Sea Lion in Smouse's yard on the west side. He 
soon afterwards purchased the property near the 
bridge which he used as a ship yard till his death, 
launching large ships where nobody thought it 
could be done. During his long career as a ship- 
builder, he launched forty vessels of all dimensions 
and rigs. The first few years of Mr. Clark's resi- 
dence in Waldoboro, was a struggle for a start in 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 255 

life, but success seemed to attend his every under- 
taking, and he soon ranked as one of the wealthy 
men of this region. At the time of his death he 
was probably the richest man in Lincoln County. 
His death, which occurred July 19, 1875, was 
caused by neuralgia of the heart. 

Mr. Clark furnished employment to a large 
number of mechanics. His course after the great 
fire of 1854, when he was urged to make some 
other town his abode, showed he had the welfare 
of Waldoboro at heart. When the project of 
building the Knox and Lincoln railroad was start- 
ed it met his favor. Upon the completion of the 
road he was made a Director, which position he 
held at the time of his death. 
Dr. Daniel Wilson. 

About 1850 there came from Newport, Me., 
one Daniel Wilson, a botanical doctor, who had a 
great run of business for several years. After 
living in Damariscotta, Warren and Rockland, his 
fame and practice gradually declined and he died 
a town charge in Waldoboro. 

Bela B. Haskell. 

Mr. Haskell was born in Hardwich, Mass., 
Oct. 27, 1805. At the age of sixteen years, he 
was induced to come to Waldoboro by William 
Haskell, who was a partner of William Sproul. 
He walked to Boston and took a packet for Wal- 
doboro where he learned the trade of carding and 



256 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

cloth dressing. He went to Windsor and spent 
three years in a carding and cloth mill. Returning 
to W'aldoboro he married Miss Elzira Sproul and 
went into trade with George Sproul. In 1837 ^^ 
went into partnership with Isaac Reed, which 
partnership continued ten years. He was inter- 
ested in shipbuilding. He was Collector of Cus- 
toms under the administrations of Taylor and Fill- 
more. He was the first and only cashier of the 
Waldoboro Bank. He died in Godfrey, 111., April 
24, 1887, aged 82 years. 
Alden Jackson. 

Mr. Jackson was born in Jefferson where his 
boyhood was passed. His education and skill in 
penmanship early brought him to the notice of 
the public and after serving in many responsible 
positions he removed to Augusta to become 
Deputy Secretary of State under Hon. John G. 
Sawyer, serving from 1850 to 1853. He was 
Secretary of State in 1854, 1855 and 1857. He 
was Secretary of the electoral college of Maine in 
1856 and 1872. As a member of the Superin- 
tending Shool Committee and Board of Assessors 
of Waldoboro, as well as a business man and citi- 
zen, Mr. Jackson was always in advance. He 
married Caroline, oldest daughter of Joseph Clark. 
His death from Bright's Disease, occured in Wal- 
doboro, July II, 1877, aged 67 years. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 257 

Moses M. Richards. 

Moses M. Richards was born in Temple, 
Maine, Feb. 15, 1830, and died in Waldoboro, 
July 29, 1909. He moved to Waldoboro in 1853. 
Before coming to Waldoboro he worked for Moses 
Bailey in Winthrop, making oil cloth carpeting. 
He located at Fish's Corner and sold goods and 
bought wool on the road for twenty years. In 
1873, he went into the business in Waldoboro, 
which grew into the clothing manufactory of M. 
M. Richards & Co., himself traveling on the road 
as salesman. When he left off traveling he was 
the oldest traveling salesman in the State of 
Maine. He was the oldest male member of the 
M. E. Church. Whatever he undertook and 
wherever he went he was a power of strength. 
He was the last of his family. 
Harriet Newell Haskell. 

Miss Harriet Newell Haskell, who died in 
Godfrey, 111., May 6, 1907, was one of the m.ost 
notable persons the town of Waldoboro ever pro- 
duced. She was born in Waldoboro, Jan. 14, 
1835, being 72 years old at the time of her death. 
Miss Haskell attended the Seminary at Castleton, 
Vt., and was graduated from Mt. Holyoke Semi- 
nary in 1855. With her sister she opened a pri- 
vate school for young ladies in the Congregation- 
al chapel in Waldoboro and afterwards taught a 
year in Boston. She returned to Waldoboro and 



258 HISTORY OF IVALDOBORO. 

taught till the fall of 1862 when she accepted the 
position of principal of Castleton Seminary, re- 
maining till 1867, when she was chosen principal 
of Monticello Seminary, Godfrey, 111., with which 
she was identified till her death, a period of nearly 
forty years. During this time, under her judicious 
management, the buildings were rebuilt and im- 
proved and the reputation of the Seminary kept 
up to the standard. 

Upon the fiftieth anniversary of her gradua- 
tion, Mt. Holyoke Seminary conferred upon her 
the degree of Doctor of Literature. July i, i860, 
she united with the Congregational church in 
Waldoboro, and retained her membership till her 
death. 

Miss Haskell was a woman of remarkable ex- 
ecutive ability and wide influence, gaining the 
love and respect of all with whom she came in 
contact. She was known as the "Grand Woman 
of the West," a title of which she was eminently 
worthy. In Waldoboro she is remembered by the 
older generation for her sterling qualities and skill 
as a teacher. One of the touching episodes of 
her life was the love which existed between her- 
self and Miss Emily G. Alden, an attachment 
which began when they were room mates at Mt. 
Holyoke Seminary and continued unabated 
through her entire eventful life. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 259 

Frank Miller. 

Among those who came with Waldo's Ger- 
man emigrants to Maine, in 1753, was Frank 
Miller, from whom the Millers of Waldoboro claim 
a direct lineage. He was born in Germany in 
1725. Although the exact spot of his birth is not 
positively known, it is now generally conceded 
that he was born in or near Bremen, one of the 
three free cities of the new German Empire, sit- 
uated on the river Weser, about fifty miles from 
the sea, and about sixty miles southwest of Ham- 
burg. 

On his arrival at Waldoboro, he settled on a 
tract of land allotted him by Waldo's agent, situat- 
ed about two miles westward of the present limits 
of the village. His family at this time consisted 
of himself, wife and son Henry, who was born the 
year preceding his father's emigration. Frank 
Miller at once began the laborious task of making 
a clearing and building a log cabin for himself and 
family. In a few years, by dint of perseverance, 
he became possessed of one of the largest and 
most productive farms in that region. This farm, 
through all the varying vicisitudes of time, has 
never been held by any parties other than those 
of the emigrant's ancestor's lineal decendants un- 
til recently. 

Authorities differ as to the trade or calling 
of the Millers in Germany. One authority states 



260 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

that they were farmers while another credits them 
with being- paper manufacturers. One reason 
given for Frank Miller's coming to America was 
that Waldo held out to him extra inducements for 
carrying on the manufacture of paper in this 
country. However as the case may be, when he 
arrived at Waldoboro, he, like his fellow emigrants, 
found that the promises of Waldo could be as 
as easily broken as made, and no alternative re- 
mained for him but to imitate the example of 
Adam, and make the earth yield to him her 
increase. 

That he was acquainted with the art of paper 
making is evidenced from the fact that his brother, 
Thomas, who was to accompany him to America 
and engage in business with him here, disembark- 
ed when the vessel, in which he sailed in company 
with the German colony, touched at Cowes, on 
the Isle of Wight, and proceeded to London 
where he began the manufacture of paper. He 
died unmarried, leaving property to the amount of 
1500 pounds. A few ^^ears ago a representative 
of the family opened a correspondence with C. D. 
Bernady, a claim agent of London, for the pur- 
pose of taking necessary steps to obtai^n posses- 
sion of the property. As the claimant could not 
furnish the documentary proof required to show 
his descent from Frank Miller, the project was 
abandoned. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 2G1 

This proof which consists of the family 
records brought hither from Germany, met a most 
pecuHar fate near the beginning of the present 
century. These records, together with the pass- 
ports, were buried with Frank Miller's wife, who 
died in Waldoboro, October 26th, 1820, at the 
age of 90 years. This strange and incomprehen- 
sible proceeding was in compliance with her re- 
quest made a short time before her death. To 
carry out such a request in the light of the value 
of these records to the genealogist, was a blunder 
worse than a crime, and can receive neither justi- 
fication nor excuse. The coat-of-arms escaped 
burial, only to be burned in the great fire which 
visited Waldoboro, October 20th, 1846, and de- 
stroyed nearly the whole business portion of the 
village as well as several residences. 

Frank Miller died in Waldoboro, February 21, 
1805, and was buried in the old German church- 
yard. His grave is marked by an ancient slab, 
erected by his son Charles, and can be easily 
seen from the entrance of the church which was 
built within the sacred enclosure. Concerning 
his personal appearance and mental endowments, 
tradition is silent. The motive which induced 
him to emigrate to America, whether it was gov- 
erned by public or private considerations, we do 
not know. Possibly it was governed by the de- 
sire to escape from the oppressive taxation and 



262 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Other burdens which naturally follow in the track 
of long continued or oppressive wars, but as he in 
common with others had been accustomed to 
this state of things, it was more probable that he 
was induced to come to America to embrace such 
a brilliant opportunity as Waldo held out, to 
improve his condition and increase his means of 
support. — Fi^NK B. Miller. 

Death of Gen. C. K. Miller. 
From the Bangor Whig and Courier, April 5, 1876. 
Our citizens will be pained to learn of the sud- 
den death, last evening, of Gen. Charles K. Miller, 
of paralysis, by which he was attacked between five 
and six o'clock, and which terminated his life at 
about ten o'clock. General Miller was one of our 
oldest and best known citizens, having held the 
office of postmaster many years, receiving his first 
appointment from President Van Buren, his com- 
mission dating May 21, 1839. He was re-ap- 
pointed by President John Tyler, March 8th, 1844, 
and held the office until March 8th, 1848. He 
was again appointed by Andrew Johnson, August 
24th, 1866, holding office, however, only until 
April I ith, 1867, when he was succeeded by Gen. 
George Fuller. General Miller was a orood citizen, 
a kind neighbor, and was respected by all who 
knew him. He survived his wife but a few 
months, she having died during the past winter. 
He leaves, we believe, but one child, the wife of 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 263 

James Vose, Esq., of Washington, D. C, who has 
been greatly afflicted, having during the year past 
buried her only child, her mother, and is now 
called home to follow the remains of her father, 
and the last of the family to the grave. General 
Miller's age was about 75. 

Charles Kinsell Miller, son of Charles and 
Elizabeth (Kinsell) Miller, was born in Waldobo- 
ro, March 19, 1803; died in Bangor, April 4, 
1876. Married Jane O. Boyd of Wiscasset who 
was born February 7, 1800; died in Bangor, Jan- 
uary I, 1876. While a resident of Bangor, Mr. 
Miller was actively engaged in lumbering. 
Dr. Frederick Robie. 

Dr. Frederick Robie was born in Gorham, 
Aug. 12, 1822, and was graduated from Bowdoin 
College in 1841, and from Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege, Philadelphia. He practiced three years in 
Waldoboro. Since leaving Waldoboro he has 
resided in Gorham. He was appointed Paymaster 
by President Lincoln at the beginning of the civil 
war and was rewarded with the rank of Lieutenant 
Colonel by brevet in recognition of his valuable 
services to the Union cause. In 1872 and 1876 
he was Speaker of the Maine House of Repre- 
sentatives, and was also a member of the Ex- 
ecutive Council, and was elected Governor of 
Maine in 1882. He is living in Gorham. 



264 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

John Balch. 

John Balch was born in Haverhill, Mass., 
Jan. 7, 1800. He came to Waldoboro in 1834, 
and served as Postmaster of Waldoboro eieht 
years and represented the town in the Legisla- 
ture two terms. He was a Mason nearly forty 
years, having been made a Mason in St. George 
Lodge, Warren, and afterwards becoming a mem- 
ber of King Solomon's Lodge in Waldoboro. 
His business was that of a druggist. He died in 
Waldoboro, May 28, 1868, and was buried with 
masonic honors. 
William White. 

William White was born in Goshen, Mass., 
April 15, 1793, the youngest of ten children. In 
1 8 10 he came to Waldoboro and worked one 
winter, and afterwards worked in Camden, Belfast 
and Bangor and finally located in Waldoboro, 
where in 1822 he married Sarah Weaver. He 
worked at his trade, that of edge tool maker, 
seventy-five years, and died in Waldoboro, July 
30, 1887, at the age of 94 years. 
John Polereczky. 

John Polereczky, who took the first census of 
Waldoboro, was a Frenchman, distinguished as a 
soldier in the army under General Rochambeau, 
and resided in Dresden where he was town clerk 
for fifteen years. 



CHAPTER XXIV. 



TOWN OFFICERS, 
To\vN Clerks. 



ETC. 



1773 


Jacob Ludvvig 


1842 


John Manning 


1784 


Jabez Cole 


1843 


Elijah A. Daggett 


1787 


Jacob Ludwig 


1844 


James R. Groton 


1789 


Jabez Cole 


1846 


William H. Manning 


1794 


Jacob Ludwig 


1848 


Thomas Genthner 


1795 


Thomas McGuyer 


1S50 


James D. Genthner 


1809 


Wm. H. Thomson 


1853 


Lincoln L. Kennedy 




Isaac G. Reed 


1856 


David N. Bond 


I8IO 


William H. Thomson 


1857 


Samuel W. Jackson 


I8I3 


Henry Flagg 


1861 


Roscoe K. Benner 


1824 


John Manning 


1862 


Samuel W. Jackson 


1834 


Hector M. Brown 


r872 


George W. Sproul 


1836 


Isaac Reed 


1879 


Jesse K. Willett 


1839 


Henry Kennedy 


1886 


Percy E. Storer 




Town T 


REASURERS. 


1773 


David Vinal 


1849 


Alfred Hovey 


1777 


Jacob Ludwig 


1851 


Daniel Castner 


1784 


Andrew Schenck 


1853 


Alden F. Miller 


1786 


John M, Schasfer 


1856 


Otis Miller 


I78S 


Andrew Schenck 


1859 


John L. Allen 


1790 


Zebedee Simmons 


1865 


Henry Farrington 


1794 


Charles Samson 


1867 


William Eugley 


1795 


Jacob Winchenbach 


1869 


John Richards 


1798 


Charles Samson 


1877 


WiUiam Eugley 


1800 


Jacob Winchenbach 


1879 


Otis Miller 


I80I 


William Sproul 


1881 


George Allen 



266 



HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 



1804 
1821 
1832 
1834 
1839 
1842 
3844 
1846 

773 

774 
775 

776 
777 
778 
779 
780 

781 

782 

783 
7S4 

785 

786 

787 
7S8 

789 
790 
791 
792 

793 
794 



Joshua Head 
Payne EUvell 
William R. Webb 
Samuel Morse 
George Allen 
William R. Webb 
Edward Benner 
George Allen 



B. B. Haskell 
M. W. Levensaler 
David W. Potter 
M. W. Levensaler 
D. H. Pulsifer 
M. W. Levensaler 
Samuel L. Miller 
M. W. Levensaler 



1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1897 

1907 

1908 
Selectmen. 
David Vinal, Christopher Newbert, John Weaver 
Solomon Hewett, Michael Heisler, Andrew Schenck 
Nathaniel Simmons, George Demuth, John Adam 

Levensaler 
lacob Winchenbach, Jacob Ludwig, Nathaniel Simmons 

Waterman Thomas, Soule, Nathaniel Simmons 

Zebedee Simmons, George Ulmer, Abijah Waterman 
Abijah Waterman, Zebedee Simmons, Conrad Seiders 
David Vinal, Stephen Andros, Peter Cramer 
Charles Samson, Jacob Ludwig, Andrew Schenck 
Nathaniel Simmons, Peter Cramer, Jacob Ludwig 
Jacob Ludwig, Joshua Howard, Philip LTlmer 
Jacob Ludwig, John Martin Shseffer, Jacob Winchen- 
bach 
Waterman Thomas, John Martin Shreffer, Joseph Lud- 
wig 
Cornelius Turner, Andrew Schenck, Waterman Thomas 
Jacob Ludwig, Joseph Ludwig, Stofel Newbert 
Jacob Ludwig, Jacob Winchenbach, Stofel Newbert 
Jacob Ludwig, George Demuth, Nathaniel Pitcher 
Jacob Ludwig, Cornelius Turner, George Demuth 
Jacob Ludwig, Joseph Ludwig, Stephen Andros 
Joseph Ludwig, John Fitzgerald, George Clouse 
Joseph Ludwig, George Demuth, Stephen Simmons 
Jacob Ludwig, Stephen Simmons, Cornelius Turner 



TOWN OFFICERS, ETC. 207 

795 David Doane, Joseph Ludwig, George Demuth 

796 Cornelius Turner, Joseph Ludwig, George Demuth 

797 Jacob Ludwig, Stephen Andros, Thomas McGuyer 
79S Thomas McGuyer, Jacob Winchenbach, John Fitz- 
gerald 

799 Thomas McGuyer, George Demuth, Jacob Ludwig 

;8oo William H. Thomas, Joseph Ludwig, Thomas McGuyer 

80 1 Thomas McGuyer, William H. Thomas, George Demuth 

802 Joshua Howard, Joseph Ludwig, Thomas McGuyer 
[803 Joseph Ludwig, William H. Thomas, Abel Cole 

:8o4 George Demuth, Thomas McGuyer, Cornelius Turner 

:8o5 Thomas McGuyer, George Demuth, Jacob Ludwig 

:8o6 Thomas McGuyer, Jacob Winchenbach, Jacob Ludwig 

:8o7 Thomas McGuyer, George Demuth, Joseph Ludwig 

r8o8 Christopher Crammer, Joseph Ludwig, William Groton 

;8o9 Christopher Crammer, John Clark, Jacob Winchenbach 

:8io Jacob Bornheimer, Charles Miller, Jacob Ludwig 

811 Isaac G. Reed, William Sproul, Benjamin Brown 

812 Joseph Ludwig, William Sproul, Isaac G. Reed 
!8i3 Benjamin Brown, Charles Miller, Jacob Ludwig, Jr. 
;8i4 Benjamin Brown, Charles Miller, Jacob Ludwig, Jr. 

I15 Benjamin Brown, Charles Miller, Samuel Morse 

816 Elijah Davis, Jacob Winchenbach, Thomas Waterman 

;8i7 Jacob Ludwig, Jr., Charles Miller, Samuel Morse 

818 Jacob Ludwig, Jr., Charles Miller, Jacob AVinchenbach 

819 Jacob Ludwig, Jr., Henry Flagg, Charles Miller 

820 Jacob Ludwig, Jr., Charles Miller, Henry Flagg 
:82i John Head, William Sproul, Charles Miller 

:82 2 Jacob Ludwig, Jr., Henry Flagg, Charles Miller 

:823 Jacob Ludwig, Jr., Henry Flagg, Charles Miller 

824 Sedidiah Arnold, Charles Samson, Frederick Castner 

825 Charles Samson, Frederick Castner, John j\Lanning 
;82 6 Charles Samson, Frederick Castner, John Manning 

827 Charles Samson, Frederick Castner, William Cole 



268 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

1828 William Cole, John Manning, Frederick Castner 

1829 William Cole, George Demuth, Jacob Ludwig 

1830 Jacob Ludwig, George Demuth, William Cole 

1 83 1 Jacob Ludwig, George Demuth, William Cole 

1832 Jacob Ludwig, Charles Miller, William Cole 
^^2>7> Jacob Ludwig, Charles Kaler, John Currier, Jr. 

1834 John Currier, Jr., John Manning, James R. Groton 

1835 Jacob Ludwig, John Levensaler, John Currier, Jr. 

1836 Jacob Ludwig, John Levensaler, Robert C. Webb 

1837 John Levensaler, William Cole, George Kaler, 3d 

1838 John Levensaler, William Cole, George Kaler, 3d 

1839 Jacob Ludwig, Edward Benner, John Kaler, Jr. 

1840 Jacob Ludwig, Edward Benner, John Kaler, Jr. 

1 84 1 Jacob Ludwig, Herman Mero, Abijah Sprague 

1842 James Cook, Frederick Castner, Alexander Young 

1843 James Cook, Frederick Castner, Henry Kennedy 

1844 Charles iNIiller, John Levensaler, Thomas Russell 

1845 Charles Miller, Christopher Crammer, Thomas Russell 

1846 Joseph Groton, Jacob Bornheimer, Charles W. Caler 

1847 James R. Groton, James Schwartz, 2d, John A. Leven- 

saler 

1848 James R. Groton, James Schwartz, 2d, Isaac Reed 

1849 Isaac Reed, James Schwartz,2d, Isaac G. Benner 

1850 Isaac Reed, John H. Kennedy, Isaac G. Benner 

185 1 Isaac Reed, Edgar Day, George Farrington 

1852 Isaac Reed, Edgar Day, George Farrington 

1853 Isaac Reed, Edgar Day, George Farrington 

1854 Thomas Genthner, Solomon M. Prock, Solomon Shuman 

1855 Isaac Reed, William F. Storer, Cyrus C. Atvvell 

1856 Isaac Reed, Cyrus C. Atwell, Alfred Storer 

1857 Alfred Storer, Augustus Welt, George Eugley 
1 85 8 Alfred Storer, Augustus Welt, George Eugley 
1859 Augustus Welt, John Storer, 2d, Christopher Feyler 
i860 Augustus Welt, John Storer, 2d, Christopher Feyler 



TOWN OFFICERS, FTC. 269 

1 86 1 Samuel W. Jackson, C. Feyler, Jesse Pitcher 

1862 Samuel W. Jackson, Jesse Pitcher, Amos M. Lash 
1863-64 Samuel W. Jackson, A. M. Lash, Andrew Sides 

1865 Samuel W. Jackson, Andrew Sides, Wm. W. Parsons 

1866 Samuel W. Jackson, Wm. W. Parsons, Cyrus C. Atwell 
1867-6S Henry Farrington, Milton Mclntyer, J. P. Glidden. 
1869-70 Henry Farrington, Milton Mclntyer, Isaac Welt 
1S71 Samuel W. Jackson, Mclntyer, Chas Comery 

1872 Samuel W. Jackson, Chas. Comery, G. H. Feyler 

1873 Samuel W. Jackson, G. H. Feyler, L S. Kaler 

1874 Augustus Welt, Chas. Comery, Geo. W. Caldwell 

1875 Milton Mclntyer, Wm. Eugley, James Schwartz, 2d 

1876 Wm. Fish, S. W. Jackson, Amos M. Lash 

1 87 7 Atherton W. Clark, W. L. Mathews, A. M. Lash 
1S78 A. W. Clark, W. L. Mathews, A. Flanders 
1S79-81 Isaac Reed, G. W. Caldwell, J. Bornheimer 
1882 S. W, Jackson, Chas. Comery, J. E. White 
1883-84 S. S. Marble, E. O. Clark, A. Flanders 
1885 Geo. Bliss, A. B. Austin, A. E. Howard 
1886-87 J- K. Willett, J. A. Mathews, A. Flanders 
1888-89 Geo. Bliss A. B. Austin, E. F. Levensaler 
1890-92 J. K. Willett, G. G. Benner, S. Creamer 
1S93-94 G. W. Caldwell, W. A. Richards, J. A. Haupt 

1895 Geo. Bliss, G. W. Young, Wm. E. Mank 

1896 G. W. Caldwell, W. A. White, B. L. Burnheimer 

1897 W. H. Miller, G. G. Benner, B. L. Burnheimer 

1898 H. F. Mclntyer, G. G. Benner, J. J. Benner 

1899 H. F. Mclntyer, G. G. Benner, A. Burnheimer 

1900 H. F. Mclntyer, G. G. Benner, C. H. Lilly 

1 901 H. F. Mclntyer, G. G. Benner, B. L. Burnheimer 

1902 C. W. Gallagher, W. H. Miller, C. A. Winchenbach 
1903-04 G. G. Benner, E. H. Davis, C. A. Winchenbach 

1905 W. H. Miller, W. H. Levensaler, O. Studley 

1906 G. G. Benner, J. E. White, Thos. F. Sproul 



270 

1907 
1908 

1909 
1910 



T779 
1782 

1785 
1788 
I790 
1795 
1799 
i8oi 
1802 
1803 
1805 
1806 

1808 
1809 



HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

William H. Miller, Oliver J. Studley, Dennis O. Stahl 
Horace F. Mcjntyre, George G. Benner, William E. 

Lermond 
Horace F. Mclntyre, George G. Benner, Thomas F. 

Sproul 
George N. Winchenbach, Wyman Tibbetts, Wells 

Deering 
Representatives to Legislature. 



Jacob Ludvvig 18 10 

Jacob Ludvvig 

Jacob Ludwig 18 11 

Jacob Ludwig 

Waterman Thomas 1 8 1 2 

Jacob Ludwig 

Jacob Ludwig 

John Head 1813 

Waterman Thomas 

Waterman Thomas 

Joshua Head 18 14 

Jacob Ludwig and 181 5 

Joshua Head 181 6 

Alden Bradford 
Benjamin Brown and 

Joseph Ludwig 18 18 



Joshua Head and 

Jacob Ludwig 
Benjamin Brown and 

Joseph Ludwig 
Benj. Brown, Isaac G. 

Reed, Joseph Lud- 
wig 
Isaac G. Reed, Jacob 

Ludwig and Henry 

Flagg 
Isaac G. Reed 
Elijah Davis 
Jacob Ludvvig, Henry 

Flagg and Charles 

Miller 
Jacob Ludvvig 



1819 Benj. Brown, Jacob Ludwig 
Above were all sent to the General Court of Massachusetts. 
Following are the Representatives to the Legislature of 

Maine : 



1S20 Isaac G. Reed 1858 

1821 John Head 1859 

1823 Benjamin Brown i860 

1824 Avery Rawson 1861 

1825 Charles Samson 1862 

1826 Charles Miller 1863 



John Balch 
Horace Winchenbach 
Horace Winchenbach 
Augustus Welt 
Augustus Welt 
Samuel VV. Jackson 



TOWN OFFICERS, ETC. 



271 



1827 


Charles Miller 


1864 


1828 


Charles Miller 


1865 


1829 


Charles Miller 


1866 


1830 


Charles Miller 


1867 


I83I 


George Sproul 


1868 


1832 


George Sproul 


1869 


^^11 


Charles Miller 


1870 


1834 


Jacob Ludwig 


1871 


1835 


George Sproul 


1872 


1836 


George Sproul 


1873 


1837 


Jacob Ludwig 


1874 


1838 


George Sproul 


1875 


1839 


Joseph Clark 


1876 


1840 


Jacob Ludwig 


1877 


I84I 


Isaac Reed 


1878 


1842 


Isaac Reed 


1879 


1843 


Charles Miller 


1880 


1844 


Edward Benner 


1882 


1845 


Isaac Reed 


1884 


1846 


John H. Kennedy 


1886 


1847 


William S. Cochran 


1888 


1848 


William S. Cochran 


1890 


1849 


William S. Cochran 


1892 


1850 


John B. Wildes 


1894 


1852 


William S. Cochran 


1896 


1853 


Benjamin L. Harriman 


1898 


1854 


Meaubec M. Rawson 


1900 


1855 


William S. Cochran 


1902 


1856 


Edgar Day 


1904 


1857 


John Balch 


1906 




1908 Jose 


ph J. Mc 




Postmasters. 


NAJME 




John 


Head 





Bela B. Haskell 
William W. Parsons 
William W. Parsons 
George W. Caldwell 
George W. Caldwell 
Isaac Reed 
Isaac Reed 
Asa Redington Reed 
Asa Redingion Reed 
Augustus Welt 
Augustus Welt 
John L. Allen 
Bela B. Haskell 
Gorham H. Feyler 
Gorham H. Feyler 
George Gilbert Benner 
George Gilbert Benner 
John H. Jameson 
Charles C. Eugley 
Edward F. Levensaler 
Horace F. Mclntyre 
Archibald S. Kaler 
George L. Welt 
J. True Sanborn 
Ephraim Burnham 
George W. Hahn 
W. R. Walter 
John Wm. Benner 
Sheridan Hodgkins 
Charles W. Gallagher 
Lain 

DATE OF APPOINTMENT 

January i, 1795 



272 HISTORY OF IVALDOBORO. 

NAME DATE OF APPOINTiMENT 

Chas. Samson December 4, 1820 

Isaac G. Reed ]\\\\ 9, 1828 

Geo. W. Nichols April 23, 183S 

John Balch March 5, 1S39 

Moses Young March 29, 1849 

William Fish, Jr. March 26, 1853 

Cyrus C. Atwell October 7, 1858 

Luther Webb June 20, 1S61 

Cyrus C. Atwell February 11, 1868 

Samuel L. Miller April i, 1869 

James H. Stanwood December 31, 1890 

Jesse K. Willett November 6, 1S93 

Walter E. Clark January 14, 1898 

Collectors of Customs. 
The port of Waldoboro was established by 
the Act of Congress approved March 31, 17S9. 
Below is given a list of the Collectors of Customs 
from the time of the establishment of the port to 
the present time. It will be noted that no ap- 
pointment is shown from January 23, 181 7, to 
February 9, 1S33. which is clue to the fact that 
the records of the of^ce in Washington covering 
the period named are missing. 

NAME DATE OF COMMISSION 

Temporary Permanent 

Waterman Thomas Apr. 10, 1795 June 13, 1795 

Joshua Head Mar. 2, 1799 

Joseph Farley, Jr. Aug. 25, 1802 Jan. 25, 1803 

Denny McCobb Aug. 9, 1816 Jan. 23, 18 17 

X X X X X 

Denny McCobb Feb. 9, 1S33 



TOWN OFFICERS, ETC. 373 

Denny McCobb Mar. ii, 1837 

Denny McCobb Oct. 17, 1837 Feb. 22, 1838 

George Allen Mar. 19, 1841 June 25, 1841 

Parker McCobb, Jr. Apr. i, 1845 
Edmund Wilson July 25, 1846 

Bela B. Haskell Apr. 23, 1849 Sept. 20, 1850 
Edmund Wilson Apr. i, 1853 

John H. Kennedy April 2, 1857 Dec. 22, 1857 

Davis Tillson Apr. i, 1861 July 27, 1861 

Sebastian S. Marble May 23, 1863 Jan. 19, 1864 

James A. Hall Aug 9, 1866 Jan. 22, 1867 
James A. Hall Jan. 21, 187: 

James A. Hall Jan. 29, 1875 

James A. Hall Feb. 19, 1879 

Henry A. Kennedy May 31, 1881 Oct. 21, 1881 
Edwin Sprague Jan. 19, 1885 

Joseph E. Moore Nov. 29, 1886 Jan. 22, 1887 
William H. Luce Jan. 28, 1891 

Joseph E. Moore Feb. 9, 1895 

Fred W. Wight Sept. 6, 1899 Dec. 23, 1899 
Fred W. Wight Hec. 21, 1903 

Fred W. Wight Jan. 15, 1908 



274 HISTORY OF WALDOBORO. 

Census of Waldoboro 

Year Population 

1790 1,210 

1800 1,516 

1810 2,160 

1820 2,449 . 

1830 3. 113 

1840 3.661 

1850 4.199 

i860 4.569 

1870 4.^74 

1880 3.758 

1890 3.505 

1900 3.145 

IQIO 



ADDENDA. 275 

ADDENDA. 
Medomak Bank. 

The Medomak Bank was incorporated in 
1836 and began business the same year. The 
first President was George D. Smouse, and James 
R. Groton was Cashier. Mr. Groton was followed 
by Parker McCobb, George Allen and David W. 
Potter. Feb. 15, 1865, the bank became a Nation- 
al Bank with the following Directors: Samuel 
W. Jackson, George D. Smouse, Henry Kennedy, 
Alfred Storer, Samuel M. Morse, George Allen 
remaining as Cashier. Mr. Allen served as 
Cashier some forty years. At this time Samuel 
W. Jackson was President. The present officers 
of the bank are A. R. Reed, Levitt Storer, Jona- 
than Mathews, George F. Weeks, Alfred Storer, 
Directors; A. R. Reed, President; Hadley H. 
Kuhn, Cashier. 
Medomak Mutual Fire Insurance Company. 

The Medomak Mutual Fire Insurance Comp- 
any was incorporated Jan. 25, 1894; organized 
and commenced business with the following 
officers and directors: William H. Levensaler, 
President; George W. Simmons, Vice-President; 
Ozro D. Castner, Secretary and Treasurer; John 
Fisk, Alpheus Ludwig, John A. Haupt, John M. 
Wlnslow, William Eugley, William E. Lermond, 
Edward F. Levensaler, James J. Benner, Hudson 
B. Stahl, Directors. The present officers are 



-276 HISTORY OF U'ALDOBORO. 

George W. Simmons, President; Wilbur Pitcher, 
Vice-President; William H. Levensaler. Secretan,- 
and Treasurer. The company has 600 policies 
outstanding, 

WALnoBORO Loan & Building Associatiox. 

The Waldoboro Loan & Building Association 
-vvas organized March iS, 1S91, with the following 
officers : Percy E. Storer, President, Charles T. 
Keene, Vice-President; Ernest A. Glidden. Secre- 
tary; George W. Voung, Treasurer; Everett Far- 
rington, Attorney: E. A. Glidden, P. E. Storer, 
IMeaubec R. Achorn. Frank Achorn. C. H. How- 
ard. G. W. Young, G. J. Kuhn, W. A. \^annah. 
Directors. The condition of the Association is 
as follows: 



Accumulated capital 


$19,667.50 


Interest 


439-73 


Fines 


S.80 


Membership Fees 


2.50 


Reser\-ed Fund 


49-1-04 


Profits 


319-03 


Certificates of Deposits 


6.124.06 


Bills Payable 


3.350.00 


Advance Payments 


4.00 


Total Liabilities 


$30,409.66 


Loans on Real Estate 


529,200.00 


Expense Account 


261.24 



ADDENDA. 27T 

Cash 948.42 



Total Resources $30,409.66 

June 30, 1910. 
Steamer Charles Houghton. 

Previous to the appearance of the steamer 
Charles Houghton on the Waldoboro route, the 
DeWitt Clinton ran here one season. In 1867 
or '68 stock was taken largely by Portland mer- 
chants and parties in Waldoboro, Damariscotta and 
Round Pond, and the Charles Houghton, a side 
wheel steamer, was placed on the Medomak and 
Damariscotta rivers, running to Portland. She 
ran here four or five years. The railroad, which 
began business in 187 1, deprived the water route 
of so much freight and passenger traffic that the 
boat was run at a loss the last year, and she was 
finally sold in Eastport, or vicinity. She was com- 
manded three years by Capt. Alden Winchen- 
bach, who was succeeded by Alexander Farnham, 
of Damariscotta. 
Water Works. 

By aneroid barometer measurement the res- 
ervoir of the Waldoboro Water Company is 105 
feet above tide water and about 75 feet higher 
than Gay's Corner. 



INDEX. 

Achorn's Mill 187 

Achorn, Edgar 21 

Addenda 275 

Aroostook War 126 

Baptist Church 219 

Berry, Hiram G 136 

Band 140 

Biographical Sketches 228 

Civil War 142 

Camden, defense of 115 

Custom House 103, 135 

Centennial Celebration 179 

Cramer, Peter 57 

Census of VValdoboro 274 

Census, First 97 

Courts 94 

Conrad Guards 135 

Congregational Church no, 218 

Collectors of Customs 272 

Charles Houghton, steamer 277 

Corn Canning 188 

Churches and Lodges 218 

Cilley, Johnathan 125 

Demuth, Henry '. 49 

Drowne Line 54 

Declaration of Lidependence 83 

Division of Town 1 2» 



INDEX. 279 

Enterprise and Boxer 113 

Embargo 112 

Early Settlement 18 

Early Settlers, list of 51 

Exodus to North Carolina 66 

Fire of 1 846 129 

Fire of 1854 134 

Fire Engine 126, 131, 177 

Foundry 133 

Fellows, John 132 

Fennelly Fund 138 

Ferry 55 

French, Ezra B 123 

German Meeting House 208 

General Knox, steamer 138 

Gruhner, Rev. Frederick 96, 231 

Hahn, Hans George 61 

Hessian Prisoners 86 

Havener, Charles 139 

Heyer, Conrad 26, 136, 228 

Head, John 1 03 

Indian War 45 

Jones' Sailloft burned 191 

Knox, Henry 8, 108 

Kinsell, Barnard 69 

Lincoln Patriot 123 

Lincoln County News 178 

Lincoln County incorporated 51 

Land Claims 53 

Lower Bridge 95 

M. E. Church 221 

Maine, Separation from Massachusetts 1 10, 1 1 7 



280 INDEX. 

Maine, State of 119 

Medomak River 12, 25 

Meeting House, first 59 

Muscongus 6 

Monhegan 5 

Moravian Mission 66 

Miller, Charles 112 

Maine Telegraph Company 131 

Medomak Engine 131 

Medomak Bank 275 

Medomak Mutual Fire Insurance Co 275 

Permanent Settlement 24 

Post Office 103, 120 

Powder House 117 

Palmer, Nathaniel 89 

Postmasters 271 

Rich, Rufus 133 

Revolution 82 

Revolutionary Soldiers 91 

Reed, Col. Isaac G no, 115, 119 

Railroad, Building 176 

Railroad, Sold 190 

Representatives, to Legislatures 270 

Reservoir, Construction of 187 

Small Pox 102 

Second Colony 40 

Soelle, George 61 

Shseffer, John Martin 60, 63, 96, loi, 229 

Soule, Levi, murder 89 

Sides, Loring 48 . 

Surplus Revenue 124 

Samson, Charles 120 

Starman, Rev. John Wm 1 1 2, 233 



INDEX. 281 

Separation 1 1 y 

Selectmen 266 

Ship Building ic)3 

Shoe Factory 189 

SprouFs Mill, burned 190 

Topography of Town 12 



Town Officers. 



77 



Town Meeting, first 77 

Town Meetings 81 

Tucker, Samuel 122 

Thomas, Waterman 103 

Town Clerks 265 

Town Treasurers 265 

Town Boundaries, surveyed 70 

Ulmer, John 27 

Union Block burned ipi 

Vannah, George 43 

Village Corporation 187 

Waldo Patent 5 

Waldo, Samuel 8 

Waldo's Circular 29 

Waldo's Stockade 45 

Waldoboro, incorporation of 72 

Werner, George 43 

Waldoboro during Revolution 82 

Waldoboro Light Infantry m 

W^aldoboro Bank 139 

Waldoboro Lyceum 123 

Waldoboro Loan & Bldg. Assn 276 

Waldoboro Electric Light Co 191 

Waldoboro Water Co 191 

Winslow's Mills 188 

War with Spain 190 



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